Modern English – ABC Ingles http://abcingles.net/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 00:14:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://abcingles.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-4-150x150.png Modern English – ABC Ingles http://abcingles.net/ 32 32 Which games have you bought more than once and why? https://abcingles.net/2021/10/09/which-games-have-you-bought-more-than-once-and-why/ Sat, 09 Oct 2021 22:05:37 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2021/10/09/which-games-have-you-bought-more-than-once-and-why/ Maybe you wanted a digital copy to replace an aging physical copy. Or one of those Complete Gold GOTY Ultimate Everything editions to get all the DLC for a game you already had. Maybe you wanted a game on a different platform for cross-play or convenience reasons. Or you forgot you already own it until […]]]>

Maybe you wanted a digital copy to replace an aging physical copy. Or one of those Complete Gold GOTY Ultimate Everything editions to get all the DLC for a game you already had. Maybe you wanted a game on a different platform for cross-play or convenience reasons. Or you forgot you already own it until you went to activate the key from a bundle. Look, that seemed like a good deal back then.

Which games have you bought more than once and why?

Here are our answers, as well as some of our forum.

(Image credit: Valve)

Nathalie Clayton: Tragically, I first played The Orange Box on Xbox 360. My PC at the time had become a mess that created a blue screen maybe a third of the time you tried to turn it on, and j ‘ve had a brief run as such. of the best Scouts on TF2 console. But the call for modding was strong, and when I finally got a decent laptop, Valve’s pack was the first thing I bought – and I immediately got to work uploading all of the custom campaigns. that I was able to find while familiarizing myself with the Source mapping tools. I’ve rarely (if ever) released any of these maps, but it pretty much kicked off my short career in game development.


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Dem gubernatorial candidates discuss education, criminal justice and health care at the Anne Arundel Co. https://abcingles.net/2021/10/08/dem-gubernatorial-candidates-discuss-education-criminal-justice-and-health-care-at-the-anne-arundel-co/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 17:20:28 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2021/10/08/dem-gubernatorial-candidates-discuss-education-criminal-justice-and-health-care-at-the-anne-arundel-co/ Six of nine Democratic gubernatorial candidates spoke at a forum hosted by the Anne Arundel County Democratic Party in Gambrills on Thursday evening. Former Obama administration official Ashwani Jain, former administration official Clinton Jon Baron, former US Secretary of Education John King, former Prince George County executive Rushern L. Baker III , entrepreneur Michael Rosenbaum […]]]>

Six of nine Democratic gubernatorial candidates spoke at a forum hosted by the Anne Arundel County Democratic Party in Gambrills on Thursday evening.

Former Obama administration official Ashwani Jain, former administration official Clinton Jon Baron, former US Secretary of Education John King, former Prince George County executive Rushern L. Baker III , entrepreneur Michael Rosenbaum and controller Peter VR Franchot (R) discuss their political positions at New Hope Faith Community Church on Thursday evening. (Courtesy Maryland Matters / Hannah Gaskill)

This content has been republished with permission from OMCT Information Partners at Maryland Matters. Sign up for Maryland Matters Free Email Subscription today.

Six of nine Democratic gubernatorial candidates spoke at a forum hosted by the Anne Arundel County Democratic Party in Gambrills on Thursday evening.

Former Obama administration official Ashwani Jain, former Clinton administration official Jon Baron, former Secretary of the US Department of Education John King, former Prince George County executive Rushern L. Baker III, entrepreneur Michael Rosenbaum and Maryland comptroller Peter VR Franchot (D) gathered at New Hope Faith Community Church to sell their constituents their positions on education, criminal justice, health care and economic reform policy.

Education policy

All applicants were asked what they would do to ensure that the Kirwan Commission Blueprint for Future Maryland Education Reform Policy “is faithfully implemented.”

Franchot and King were also asked about their opinion on standardized testing.

Francois: The comptroller is determined to eliminate standardized testing – or at least limit it in Maryland classrooms as much as federal law allows.

“We have a fetish for standardized testing in Maryland,” Franchot told forum moderators.

On the contrary, Franchot, who opposed the education reform legislation of the Master Plan for Maryland, is placing his bets on a change in the school curriculum that includes teacher membership and offers students ” skills and knowledge about the modern economy ”.

Rosenbaum: Rosenbaum called Maryland’s Blueprint for the Future of “the floor, not the goal” and said the state must “rely” not only on children who attend college, but also on those who are in college. enter the labor market directly.

“We have to start with the Blueprint and build from there,” he said.

Baker: Baker stressed the need to ensure that funding is available to enact reform policies, as well as the enveloping services needed to enact program change.

King: Former US Secretary of Education said he was “hopeful” of what the Blueprint for the Future of Maryland might mean for education in the state’s most disadvantaged schools .

King said he sees standardized testing as a tool the federal government uses to ensure transparency in the education system and to ensure that vulnerable populations, such as children who speak English as a second language, do not get lost. in the reshuffle.

“What the federal government is looking for is to make sure we are serving all of our students well and being honest about whether or not we are serving our English learners, serving our students of color, serving our low income students.” King said. “So the type of assessment is less of the problem and more of making sure we’re transparent about the equity gaps in our schools. “

Baron: Baron stressed the need to ensure that appropriate funding to implement the Master Plan is available, but also pushed for the idea that the state should implement educational programs that have shown positive results elsewhere, such as basic tutoring services and vocational training.

Jain: Rather than specifically addressing the Master Plan reforms, Jain pointed to “tangible next steps” the state could take in the short term, such as canceling student debt for teachers, building schools in schools. low-income areas, investment in science, technology, engineering and math programs. for middle school students and free public transport to ensure that it is not a problem for children to get to school.

Police reform

Candidates were asked about their thoughts on the broad police reform legislation passed by the General Assembly in the 2021 legislative session and what they think about it not eliminating immunity qualified for state and municipal employees.

Under current Maryland law, state employees – including law enforcement agencies – are immune from civil liability for transgressions that violate the rights of others if the alleged action between within the scope of their job description and was objectively reasonable, or committed without malicious intent or gross negligence.

Francois: The comptroller pointed to community policing, or what he described as familiarity between residents and duty officers, as a response to the problems of criminal justice reform. He did not address qualified immunity.

Rosenbaum: For Rosenbaum, reducing crime lies in economic opportunity and moving away from the status quo of using “incarceration as the only strategy” to deter crime.

“It’s crazy. It obviously doesn’t work,” Rosenbaum said. “We keep spending more money and we’re not more fair and we’re not more secure.”

“The reality is that unless we provide a path of economic security for everyone, we will not be safe,” he continued.

Baker: Baker has said he has been against qualified immunity since he was in the legislature nearly two decades ago.

The former Prince George County executive, who served in the House of Delegates for nine years, said the police reform agenda passed in the 2021 session is good, but the real reform is happening there where the boots are on the ground.

“I think what they have done in the state is great – applauded – but most of the problems are at the local level,” Baker said. “If you don’t work with the local police department … then you don’t hit where all the problems are. [are], therefore, the state, the counties and the city must work together.

King: King said the answer lies not just in police reform, but in how the state approaches public safety as a whole.

“We are now asking the criminal justice system to respond to drug addiction rather than trying to treat people; we call on the criminal justice system to respond to trauma rather than providing mental health services or adequate psychiatric beds in the state; we asked the police to deal with someone with a mental health crisis, which really should be addressed with a social worker or counselor, ”King said. “We need to rethink our approach.

Baron: Barron said he supported the reform legislation passed this year, but suggested the state focus on proven training policy and strategies that have proven effective in other jurisdictions.

Jain: Jain has held firm in his stance against qualified immunity.

“It doesn’t make sense to be immune if you’re doing a bad job. It’s that clear and simple,” he said. “But I think it goes beyond that.”

Jain suggested that reform is best done holistically rather than taking a “piecemeal” approach. For him, this means adopting policies that would abolish the cash bond, deploying mental health professionals rather than the police for certain emergency calls, ending the school resource officer program in public schools, and legalizing the cannabis and clear criminal records for those who spent time behind bars during its ban.

“I think it’s not just about making sure that those who commit illegal actions – killing blacks and browns as if it were a targeted practice – are held accountable, but times, it’s about looking at the whole system in a holistic and sustainable way, ”Jain said. . “This is how we can stop having these same problems that… I’m sick of hearing about every electoral cycle.”

Health care

Candidates were asked if they were in favor of a single-payer health care system.

Francois: Although he did not directly address the issue of single-payer health care, the Monitor expressed a desire to “significantly” expand Medicaid coverage.

Rosenbaum: Rosenbaum said policymakers are having the wrong conversation: Instead of continually tweaking the same policy to make things better “here and there”, the entrepreneur has focused on economic security.

“When we think of economic security, the amount of money we spend on health care actually gives us the opportunity to ask ourselves, ‘How do we achieve economic security for everyone?’ because when I have a stable job, I have a roof over my head, I have a refrigerator, I have air conditioning, I have a primary care doctor, it makes us healthier ” , did he declare.

Baker: In short, yes, Baker supports a single payer healthcare system.

“I supported him when I was a legislator. I support him now as part of our platform, ”he said.

King: King said the issue of a single-payer health care system should be left to the federal government and the state should focus on more immediate solutions, such as ensuring undocumented residents are not denied medical treatment. health care due to insecurity, or tackling deep-rooted racial disparities in medicine.

Baron: No, Baron does not support a single payer system and believes the Affordable Care Act “has worked very well in Maryland.”

For Baron, the real problem is the cost.

“What we need in healthcare [is] to scale up interventions – innovations in health care delivery – that have been tested and shown to improve health and reduce costs, ”he said.

Jain: A cancer survivor who works at a nonprofit health care organization, Jain worked on Affordable Care Act policy during his tenure with the Obama administration, he said. But he, like King, said he would shift his focus to more immediate state-level solutions, like investing to expand access to health care in underserved communities, looking at food insecurity throughout the state, treating the opioid epidemic as a health crisis rather than a criminal justice issue, and enshrining access to abortion in the state constitution.

hgaskill@marylandmatters.org


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Restoration of Stonehenge: securing a 120-year Neolithic monument https://abcingles.net/2021/10/07/restoration-of-stonehenge-securing-a-120-year-neolithic-monument/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 13:41:27 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2021/10/07/restoration-of-stonehenge-securing-a-120-year-neolithic-monument/ Conservation begins on the Stonehenge lintels. The September project represented the most significant conservation work carried out on the Neolithic monument in over 60 years. Photo: English Heritage. This fall, specialists worked to conserve some of the Stonehenge sarsens, the latest in a series of initiatives dating back to the dawn of the 20th century. […]]]>
Conservation begins on the Stonehenge lintels. The September project represented the most significant conservation work carried out on the Neolithic monument in over 60 years. Photo: English Heritage.

This fall, specialists worked to conserve some of the Stonehenge sarsens, the latest in a series of initiatives dating back to the dawn of the 20th century. Carly Hilts spoke to Heather Sebire to find out more.

Visitors to Stonehenge in September may have noticed a surprisingly modern addition to the Neolithic monument: a movable scaffolding tower. This fall saw one of the most significant conservation projects to take place at the site in over six decades, aimed at protecting the stones from erosion as well as reversing some of the effects of well-intentioned but ultimately damaging repairs. carried out more than half a century earlier.

The recent conservation work stems from two previous research: a laser study of the monument and a detailed report by an engineer. The old initiative saw high-resolution scans undertaken in 2012, during Stonehenge’s first full laser survey. This was intended to help record and assess the condition of the stones, but also revealed that the prehistoric graffiti that was first identified at the site in the 1950s was much more extensive than previously thought. Some 71 hitherto unknown sculptures of ax heads resembling artefacts known from the early Bronze Age (circa 1750-1500 BC to date (see CA 273). These analyzes were also an essential tool to help English Heritage, of which Stonehenge is responsible, to identify any cracks or other erosion in the stones.

The other key piece of the research was a study conducted in 2018, led by Professor David Nash of the University of Brighton, which saw chemical analysis used to determine where the Stonehenge sarsens were mined. Sarens, added to Stonehenge around 2500 BC. . Unlike the smaller blue stones, which were traced in the Preseli region of West Wales (CA 366, 345 and 311), and the sandstone altar stone, which originates from the east from Wales, the Sarens are rather more local in origin, having been traced to West Woods in the Marlborough Downs, about 25 miles north of Stonehenge (CA 367). Nash’s research also enabled English Heritage to conduct a more comprehensive examination of the state of conservation of the stones.

“At the same time that the scaffolding was ready for this chemical analysis, we took the opportunity to ask the engineers at Historic England to report on the stability of the stones, especially the horizontal lintels, as they had no not been examined in years. ‘explained Dr Heather Sebire, senior property curator at Stonehenge. The good news was there was nothing structural to do – we weren’t worried about the lintels falling off or anything like that – but the report did highlight some problems associated with repairs to the frames. 1950s and 1960s, when they used a very hard mortar that we wouldn’t use today.

Dr Heather Sebire inspects some of the Stonehenge lintels with James Preston of Sally Strachey Historic Conservation. Photo: English Heritage.

Historical repairs have particularly affected the joints between the lintels and their supporting uprights. These towering constructions represent an impressive feat of prehistoric engineering: with each sarsen measuring up to 9 m in height and weighing up to 30 tonnes, they fit together using an impressive system of studs and bolt holes. protruding mortise, while the lintels themselves interlock. using tongue-and-groove joints reminiscent of woodworking. However, when the stones were last restored over half a century ago, many of these joints had been wrapped with hard mortar which is not breathable. As the material degrades over time, it leaves the stones vulnerable to damage from trapped moisture which freezes and expands in cracks, causing erosion.

To counter this, English Heritage brought in specialists from Sally Strachey Historic Conservation to remove the old mortar and fill the joints with breathable lime mortar, allowing water to escape. Two conservators used a scaffold tower to access the tops of the stones to complete this work, and they also examined the skyward surfaces of each of the nine lintels that are still in place, looking for any naturally formed holes that might be large or deep enough to form puddles. It is hoped that these efforts, combined with regular monitoring in the future, will allow the stones to withstand the forces of wind and weather for many years to come.


This is an excerpt from an article in California 380. Keep reading in the magazine (click here to subscribe) or on our new website, The past, which details all of the magazine’s content. At The Past you can read each article in its entirety as well as the content of our other magazines, Current World Archeology, Neck brace, and Military history questions.


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ABC Chief Information Officer Gaven Morris Resigns After “Huge Contribution” to Broadcaster | Australian Broadcasting Corporation https://abcingles.net/2021/10/07/abc-chief-information-officer-gaven-morris-resigns-after-huge-contribution-to-broadcaster-australian-broadcasting-corporation/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 02:59:00 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2021/10/07/abc-chief-information-officer-gaven-morris-resigns-after-huge-contribution-to-broadcaster-australian-broadcasting-corporation/ ABC chief information officer Gaven Morris resigned after six years at the helm of the company, saying he would not sign a new contract because he wanted to take on a new challenge. Morris, who founded ABC News in 2010, was appointed news director in 2015 at the age of 43 after starting as a […]]]>

ABC chief information officer Gaven Morris resigned after six years at the helm of the company, saying he would not sign a new contract because he wanted to take on a new challenge.

Morris, who founded ABC News in 2010, was appointed news director in 2015 at the age of 43 after starting as a reporter at the age of 20.

“Gaven’s contribution to the ABC has been enormous,” ABC chief executive David Anderson told staff in a surprise email Thursday.

“His strategic vision, dynamism and boundless energy were an integral part of a series of accomplishments, including leading the 2010 launch of the ABC News channel; spearhead ABC News’ ascent to digital excellence; the creation of journalistic centers for ABC surveys and the specialized reporting team; promote News culture of diversity and inclusion; and drive the strategy to make News content and services more relevant to all Australians.

Morris started out as a copier at the then Fairfax newspapers in Canberra in the early 1990s and has a background in 24 hour and international news with appearances on CNN, Al-Jazeera English and Network Ten.

“I have decided not to pursue a new contract at the end of my current contract and have let our general manager David Anderson know that I am looking forward to researching my next challenge,” Morris told the staff.

“I have given David a lot of notice and will continue to serve the ABC for as long as he needs. I will keep you posted on the recruitment process for the next Director over the next few weeks.

It starts off on a high note, ABC News being the number one digital news site for more than a year since it overtook Rupert Murdoch’s news.com.au.

But the success of ABC’s digital news has made it another target for News Corp, which regularly attacks the broadcaster’s journalism at its outlets, especially in Australia.

As Chief Information Officer, Morris is responsible for the country’s largest news gathering workforce: around 1,200 employees across eight newsrooms in the capital, 11 international offices and three meeting rooms. suburban press in Parramatta, Geelong and Ipswich.

Likely internal candidates include Editorial Director Craig McMurtrie and Chief Investigative Journalism John Lyons.

Morris, who turns 50 next year, championed the 50:50 project to “reflect all the diversity of modern Australia” in ABC’s content and workforce.

“Thanks to all of you work, I think we’ve made more progress here in the past five years than in the previous 50 years,” Morris said.


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Translators and experts take part in the debate on “Squid Game” subtitles https://abcingles.net/2021/10/06/translators-and-experts-take-part-in-the-debate-on-squid-game-subtitles/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 15:35:19 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2021/10/06/translators-and-experts-take-part-in-the-debate-on-squid-game-subtitles/ Like so many people around the world, Youngmi Mayer recently took to Netflix’s survival drama “Squid Game”. The comedian and co-host of the Feeling Asian podcast, who speaks fluent Korean, expressed some of his frustrations on TikTok last week on what she believed to be the English subtitles of “Squid Game” in a video that […]]]>

Like so many people around the world, Youngmi Mayer recently took to Netflix’s survival drama “Squid Game”. The comedian and co-host of the Feeling Asian podcast, who speaks fluent Korean, expressed some of his frustrations on TikTok last week on what she believed to be the English subtitles of “Squid Game” in a video that has since racked up over 10 million views.

In one of Mayer’s widely viewed videos, she said brash character Han Mi-nyeo’s dialogue was “sloppy” and sterilized. When the actor tries to convince other players to play a game with her, the caption reads, “I’m no genius, but still managed to do it,” but Mayer said she actually said, “I’m very smart. I just never had the chance to study.

For some bilingual and multilingual Koreans who watch “Squid Game” with English subtitles or closed captions, some aspect of the dystopian series felt lost in translation. But experts also point out that translation is an art form, often underestimated, underpaid, and limited by industry practices.

Mayer’s videos sparked an online debate over translation, subtitles and dubbing, with viewers echoing Mayer’s concerns on social media, accusing “Squid Game” and other Netflix productions of removing the big ones. words and the suggestive language of the subtitles and condense the dialogue so that it can change. the meaning of a scene. However, many Korean language speakers pointed out that they disagreed with Mayer’s translations.

Netflix did not respond to a request for comment on the English translation process for “Squid Game”.

Actor Edward Hong, who was part of the English dubbing cast of “Squid Game”, was delighted to see that the voice actors were of Korean and Asian descent, which he said helped correct translation errors in the script or to add authenticity.

“Korean actors, even if they don’t speak fluently, can shout something if it’s not right,” said Hong, who voiced Player 244, a pastor, on the hit series. “The way Korean clerics, especially pastors, speak is a very specific way of speaking. This is something I knew all too well to have been stuck in these Korean religious services when I was a child.

Hong said that voice acting is hard work, even more so than voice acting for animation, as the actor has to honor the performance of the original actor while also matching the flaps of the actor’s mouth, so it’s not out of sync. He founded the List of PGM VOs, short for People of the Global Majority Voice-Off List, in 2020 to support efforts for inclusion in voice-over work.

Subtitled in 31 languages and dubbed in 13, Hwang Dong-hyuk’s allegory on modern capitalist society and class disparity reached Netflix’s No. 1 spot in 90 countries.

“Audiovisual translation, subtitling in particular, is limited to space constraints on the screen,” explains translator Denise Kripper, who has captioned numerous television shows. “Typically, captions can’t be longer than two lines, that’s even fewer characters than a tweet. The most perfect translation still needs to be paraphrased or adapted if it does not fit within these spatial limits.

Kripper said each channel or platform has its own guidelines for formatting, offensive language, and culture-specific references.

“The audiovisual industry is changing fast, time is money on TV, so translation times can be quick,” she said. “Translators work around the clock so people can watch their favorite shows. ”

In other video, Mayer said that the title of the first episode of “Squid Game” translates to “The Day the Mugunghwa Flower Bloomed,” a reference to the game’s Korean name, “The Mugunghwa Flower Bloomed” and the flower National South Korea. But the English subtitles just read “Red Light, Green Light,” as the game is known in the US, which she says erases its metaphorical meaning.

Mayer, like many others, did not initially realize that she was watching the Korean drama with English subtitles rather than subtitles, but she said that even after watching the subtitled version titled, she still felt frustrated.

“I still think there are so many important things missing from the story,” Mayer told NBC Asian America. “I understand that there is a cultural difference and that we don’t have time to explain things in detail, but I’ve seen a lot of people say, ‘I’d like to know what that means.’ I think it does a great disservice to the writer that the translator, [because] economy of words, cannot include these cultural references.


Contestants face off in one of the deadly games from dystopian Korean survival drama “Squid Game” on Netflix.Netflix

Mayer and others online have noted that translation work is often underestimated, and the sheer volume of content makes translation for film and television even more difficult. Some studios have chosen to use automatic translation, which Kripper says is not efficient compared to using a real translator.

While viewers credited the translated subtitles and the English dubbed versions of “Squid Game” as being more accurate than closed captions, some Koreans believe this highlights a more significant historical issue at play.

Greta Jung, who has dubbed roles for several Korean and Chinese Netflix shows, shared the sentiments of fans who fear English speakers will watch a watered-down version of “Squid Game.”

“They should have taken a parenthesis in the subtitles when the North Korean character is speaking,” Jung said. “[Kang Sae-byeok] has a North Korean accent and hides it around South Koreans – it’s important, it’s meaningful. “

Masked staff members handle boxes containing the corpses of participants in the Korean survival drama “Squid Game” on Netflix. Youngkyu Park / Netflix

Jung added that the context would open the minds of Americans to the fact that there are accents in other languages.

“The world doesn’t revolve around English,” she said.

Americans were previously known to avoid foreign language programs and be averse to playing subtitles, as a director. Bong Joon Ho made a famous joke about during his Golden Globe 2020 acceptance speech for “Parasite”.

“Much of the challenge in preserving cultural references in translation comes from a widespread lack of familiarity and exposure of English speakers, Americans in particular, to other cultures,” Kipper said. “The more films they watch with subtitles, the more books they read translated, the better it is to be able to appreciate and experience a different culture, which is the point of translation.”

Views of foreign language titles have been more than 50 percent in 2020 on Netflix, and the streaming giant said the average American viewer now watches three more time dubbed content as in 2018, which underlines the importance of casting.

Fans like Mayer are hoping that productions can do more to preserve linguistic and cultural accuracy and give English-speaking viewers a little more credit, for example by believing that if viewers don’t understand something, they can seek it out.

“People are watching the media now with their phones in their hands,” Mayer said. “Imagine if someone who wrote ‘True Detective’ was like, ‘Well, people won’t have that reference, so let’s delete it.’ It would never happen.


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“Orwell’s Roses” by Rebecca Solnit Reveiw: gardening as resistance https://abcingles.net/2021/10/06/orwells-roses-by-rebecca-solnit-reveiw-gardening-as-resistance/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 00:03:14 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2021/10/06/orwells-roses-by-rebecca-solnit-reveiw-gardening-as-resistance/ “1984” is one of the few novels that correctly sums up the terror of the 20th century. Universally referenced and recognized as the work that coined the eponymous phrase “Orwellian,” “1984” is the truest expression of the end state of totalitarianism – a dystopia of frightening realism. When I first read “1984”, I was in […]]]>

“1984” is one of the few novels that correctly sums up the terror of the 20th century. Universally referenced and recognized as the work that coined the eponymous phrase “Orwellian,” “1984” is the truest expression of the end state of totalitarianism – a dystopia of frightening realism. When I first read “1984”, I was in awe of the author’s imagination. I imagined a stern author, his forehead wrinkled across his dark, uniquely British face, leaning over a typewriter as he pondered the evils of his time.

Yet Orwell was much more than a dark political theorist. A thoughtful and humorous man, Orwell reveled in many of England’s quaint traditions – English puddings, flea markets, and unintelligible, friendly accents – even though he rose up against his nation’s imperialism.

Throughout his years as an Imperial policeman in Burma and his time in the trenches of the Spanish Civil War, Orwell retained a love for the natural world and the English countryside. In her new book “Orwell’s Roses,” activist and historian Rebecca Solnit reveals this lesser-known side of Orwell – a side as concerned with beauty as with truth.


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‘Tales’ book humanizes not-so-bad old villains https://abcingles.net/2021/10/05/tales-book-humanizes-not-so-bad-old-villains/ Tue, 05 Oct 2021 06:57:58 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2021/10/05/tales-book-humanizes-not-so-bad-old-villains/ In his latest collection of short stories, “Tales the Devil Told Me,” Little Rock author Jen Fawkes offers a fresh perspective on some old villains. Fawkes, through his cheerfully twisted lens, reinvented these particular thieves and gave them new life, new dimensions, and new possibilities. The result is an incredibly entertaining group of 12 stories […]]]>

In his latest collection of short stories, “Tales the Devil Told Me,” Little Rock author Jen Fawkes offers a fresh perspective on some old villains.

Fawkes, through his cheerfully twisted lens, reinvented these particular thieves and gave them new life, new dimensions, and new possibilities. The result is an incredibly entertaining group of 12 stories that range from violent to hilarious, clever to poignant.

Here’s Captain James Hook, plus a scalawag pirate stalking Peter Pan, but a beloved suburban mailman who is happily married, sees a therapist, and does his best to be a good dad to his surly teenage stepson – who just happens to be named Peter (!) – in “Never, ever”.

Medusa wears a burlap sack on her head, runs the bar, plays in a band called the Gorgons, and dates a plastic surgeon in the comedy “As You Can Imagine, Makes Dating Difficult”. In “Tiny Bones” we learn about the traumatic childhood that formed the witch of “Hansel and Gretel” and Moby Dick sends a poetic and loving letter to a special someone in “Dear Ahab”.

The opening story, “Demerol, Demerol, Benzedrine, Schnapps” is a bloody, funny and heartbreaking update to “Rumpelstiltskin”, with addiction issues, a lie about needing gold spun with straw for a king and the protagonist of rumplestilt clinging to the hope that looking after a human baby will help him clean up his act.

At the heart of “Tales the Devil Told Me”, out today by North Carolina publisher Press 53, is the short story “The Tragedie of Claudius, Prince of Denmark”, in which Fawkes imagines the scheming uncle of Hamlet in a more sympathetic manner. light after all these years surrounded by the madness of his father and his brother in Elsinore.

The book, which follows last year’s excellent debut “Mannequin and Wife” collection, is further proof that Fawkes, 47, is an extremely gifted writer. She resuscitates each of these characters with care, intelligence and undeniable verve and confidence. A project like this could easily have become awkward in the hands of someone less skilled, or a show-off from a less sensitive writer, but Fawkes sticks the landing every time.

And the cover, by Claire V. Foxx, is perfect.

“Tales the Devil Told Me” (Special Democrat-Gazette / Press 53)

Fawkes, winner of the 2021 Porter Fund Literary Prize, didn’t even start writing until she was 30. “Tales the Devil Told Me” was his Masters of Fine Arts thesis at Hollins University in Roanoke, Virginia.

She was passionate about the idea of ​​the further transformation of folk art from earlier eras into higher art, which she learned as an undergraduate student from George Stade, professor emeritus of English literature at the Columbia University, where she was also introduced to many of the stories she would revisit in “Tales …”.

“This idea really turned me on,” she says. “Years later, while in my MFA program and thinking about a thesis project, I got the idea to write from the perspective of all the characters Ulysses meets in ‘ The Odyssey ‘. “

This culminated in the violent but offbeat “A Moment on the Lips”, about Cyclops Polyphemus and the first story she wrote that would end in “Tales the Devil Told Me”.

Zachary Mason had previously written a similar book, “The Lost Books of the Odyssey”, so Fawkes changed his approach.

“I thought, what about watching other popular villains,” she said. “It could be really interesting, a thematically related book where each story reinvents some form of popular quotation mark fiction from the perspective of the villain or someone close to the villain.”

Bringing a different perspective to difficult characters is something she says she wants to explore more in her work.

“One of my long-term projects is to humanize characters that we think of as bad guys. I don’t really believe in bad guys.”

“Never, never” was the second story she wrote for the collection. Unlike “A Moment on the Lips”, which takes place in the world of “The Odyssey”, she moved it to modern times with different characters. This comfort of moving between sets, periods and styles is one of the strengths of Fawkes, something that was evident in “Mannequin and Wife”.

“I like the variety in a book,” she says. “I’m not a big fan of stories that all look alike. I thought if I could pull it off maybe I could give each one their own special fit so that hopefully readers have the references, and if they don’t ‘To know the credentials, the stories will still be enjoyable as stand-alone stories. “

Jen Fawkes book launch

6:30 p.m. Thursday, WordsWorth Books, 5920 R St., Little Rock

wordworthbookstore.com | (501) 663-9198


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KU experts can talk about spooky seasonal topics for Halloween https://abcingles.net/2021/10/04/ku-experts-can-talk-about-spooky-seasonal-topics-for-halloween/ Mon, 04 Oct 2021 13:25:59 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2021/10/04/ku-experts-can-talk-about-spooky-seasonal-topics-for-halloween/ LAWRENCE – Witches and Zombies, Vampires, Ghosts and Gargoyles – there are experts from the University of Kansas available to explain our fascination with most literary, stage and screen minds this Halloween season. Jane barnette, an associate professor in the KU theater and dance department, says she research in portraying witchcraft on stage and on […]]]>

LAWRENCE – Witches and Zombies, Vampires, Ghosts and Gargoyles – there are experts from the University of Kansas available to explain our fascination with most literary, stage and screen minds this Halloween season.

Jane barnette, an associate professor in the KU theater and dance department, says she research in portraying witchcraft on stage and on screen corresponds to her own interest as a practitioner. She spoke about the two in an episode of KU News Service “When the experts attack! »Podcast in 2020.

Barnette just wrote a chapter on #WitchTok, a subculture within the TikTok app, for Routledge editors’ forthcoming book, “TikTok Cultures,” edited by viral dance sensation and educator Trevor Boffone. In addition, her article on the 1836 American play “Witchcraft” by Joanna Baillie will be published this year in the journal Theater History Studies.

Paul Scott, professor at the University of KansasPaul Scott, associate professor of French and affiliated with the J. Wayne and Elsie M. Gunn Center for the Study of Science Fiction at KU, has a secondary activity as a zombie expert, having written extensively on modern manifestations of the flesh-eating ghoul trope. Last year he published an article titled “From contagion to cogitation: the evolving television zombie” in the journal Science Fiction Studies. He is working on a delivered on the subject, recently expanding its subject matter to include the South Korean series “Zombie Detective” and “Sweet Home”. Scott spoke at the June 2021 Science Fiction Research Association conference, giving an article titled “A Rational Zombie’s Critique of Capitalism in Zombie Detective”. He will teach a winter course, French 150, entitled “Zombies, Aliens, Monsters”.

Ani Kokobobo, professor at the University of KansasShape-changing leeches have proven to be a popular topic for Ani Kokobobo, Associate Professor and Chairman of the Department of Slavic and Eurasian Languages ​​and Literatures. She’s teaching Slavic 230 again this semester – The vampire in literature, film and television. The course examines the historical development of the vampire i.e. Dracula, a legend in Eastern Europe leading to his contemporary cinematic and pop variations. The teacher said she learned from teaching the class that “since the vampire is a figure who by definition often has to feed on others for his own survival, he can be a useful tool in assessing our own morals and broader ethical questions. . “

Giselle Anatol, professor at the University of KansasGiselle Anatol focused on a whole different kind of vampire, caring for the Caribbean, in her 2015 book The Things That Fly in the Night: Female Vampires in Circum-Caribbean and African Diaspora Literature “ from Rutgers University Press. A professor in the English department, Anatol grew up listening to folk tales of the “loogaroo,” or “old witch,” who shed her skin overnight and flies around her community to suck blood from unwitting victims. Anatol said worryingly This figure was generally used to encourage children to be obedient, but also to reinforce certain perceptions about the role of women and the elderly in the Caribbean and the Deep South of the United States.

John Tibbetts, professor at the University of KansasJohn Tibbett was goth before goth was cool. The prolific author, former television journalist, film critic and former professor of film and media studies has just published the fourth in a series of books on Gothic horror topics. He started with “The Gothic Imagination: Conversations on Fantasy, Horror and Science Fiction in the Media” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011) and continued until “The Gothic Worlds of Peter Straub” (McFarland, 2016), whom Tibbetts calls “America’s greatest ghost story writer”. Lately he has focused on two debuts of the 20e British writers of the century of strange fiction. His biography “The Furies of Marjorie Bowen” (McFarland, 2019) was the first about him, followed by his exploration of “The Dark Side of GK Chesterton: Gargoyles and Grotesques” (McFarland, 2021). Tibbetts said he hoped his two edited volumes of “The Marjorie Bowen Reader” would be released later this year. Tibbetts was a friend of the late science fiction writer Ray Bradbury, and he interviewed many contemporary horror filmmakers, from John Carpenter to Tim Burton. He can speak eloquently about the allure of the strange.

To arrange interviews with any of these KU researchers, please contact Rick Hellman, KU Press Office Public Affairs Manager, at rick_hellman@ku.edu or 913-620-8786.


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BLO Cavalleria rusticana: Dramatic Verismo Mayhem https://abcingles.net/2021/10/03/blo-cavalleria-rusticana-dramatic-verismo-mayhem/ Sun, 03 Oct 2021 15:29:04 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2021/10/03/blo-cavalleria-rusticana-dramatic-verismo-mayhem/ Adam Diegel as Turiddu (Photo by Lisa Voll) Michelle Johnsonas Santuzza and Nina Yoshida Nelsen as Mamma Lucia (Photo by Liza Voll) Two years ago, the Boston Lyric Opera presented the circus of Pagliacci at the Steriti Memorial ice rink (review HERE). This weekend, BLO is honoring the work most often programmed opposite: the in […]]]>

Adam Diegel as Turiddu (Photo by Lisa Voll)
Michelle Johnsonas Santuzza and Nina Yoshida Nelsen as Mamma Lucia (Photo by Liza Voll)

Two years ago, the Boston Lyric Opera presented the circus of Pagliacci at the Steriti Memorial ice rink (review HERE). This weekend, BLO is honoring the work most often programmed opposite: the in one act by Pietro Mascagni verism the tragedy Cavalleria rusticana (1890)

This succinct opera has the tone of a modern thriller and lets us contemplate the deadly consequences of infidelity and jealousy for five members of a tight-knit community. Returning to the live performances on the Boston Waterfront after a successful eight-part online miniseries during the pandemic (discussion HERE and review HERE), this outdoor night started with a remarkable addition: Pagliaccithe famous prologue to, skillfully and enthusiastically sung by Chilean baritone Javier Arrey; starting from a spectacular alleyway in the audience, he made his way to the stage.

Production
Cavalleria started around 7:50 p.m., competing throughout the evening with expected (regular) plane take-offs and a noisy rock event in the seaport area that bounced off a building behind the left area of ​​the stage. The spectators moved on three lines (vaccination card / recent test, security, tickets / ushers, before being directed to their seats. The listeners could settle down to explore different acoustic possibilities and seek a more spacious “distance”, since only the front half of the spacious Leader Bank Pavillion was packed.

A trio of three modern ballet dancers (barefoot, in gray), choreographed by Levi Marsman, was omnipresent during the first and last third of Cavalleria. While they weren’t always captured on the side screens during the singers’ video close-ups, their interpretive antics could be clearly seen from all points of view. Sometimes acting like a Greek choir and sometimes depicting festive elements like flowers and crowds, dancers Victoria Awkward, Machayla Kelly and Marissa Molinar formed a sinuous and bubbling unit. They added much needed life and movement to the entire production, although they performed surprisingly: they took time off from the long orchestral Intermezzo which takes place during the Easter service attended by Lola and Turiddu, while ‘they frantically surrounded Lola, waving her off the stage in the final scene (surrounding her and nearly carrying her away).

Director Giselle Ty created an intricate, melodramatic scene to the fore through a painstakingly mimed introduction for soloists and dancers. This contrasted sharply with the rest of the production, based on arrangements, stacks and barricades of bright yellow rattan café chairs (Julia Noulin-Mêrat, scenography) and modern clothing in Crayola colors for each of the protagonists (Gail Astrid Buckley, costume design). Since the orchestra and choir took up half of the un-raked performance space, with a monumental black curtain supporting them, the lighting tended towards brilliant monochromatic washes (pinks and blues were most effective. to set or change the mood), with occasional abstract patterns projected above the orchestra, directly onto the curtain (Molly Tiede, lighting designer).

Two speaker benches suspended above the central stage amplified and projected the performers into the microphone. Those in the center 50% of the seating area had no trouble hearing most of Mascagni’s delicate orchestral touches and following every word of the story, but the fairly loud uproar from the surrounding seaport made these more difficult sections the further away from the stage. The slender architecture of the Pavilion’s circus tent is open on the sides, fostering a party atmosphere more akin to Café Momus than to a Sicilian working-class village at Easter.

Chelsea Basler as Lola, w. Michayla Kelly dancer (photo by Lisa Voll)

Voice
The chorus from the top of the stage (in black), standing singing, sounded robust, well balanced and well prepared by Brett Hodgdon. Its sound projected with real substance, with a particularly appealing tenor section sound, although its power sometimes overbalanced Santuzza. In the ensemble number “Let us sing hymns”, with its famous soaring melody, the choir and orchestra combined in a spectacularly moving and effective progressive crescendo, performed by the trio of dancers.

Tenor Adam Diegel began subtly with Turiddu’s “off stage” siciliana, performed here from the center of the dark orchestra of the stage, facing the well-lit conductor David Angus on the far left of the stage. His portrayal of the central bad boy (dressed in royal blue) started quietly but gained strength and momentum after the powerful church scene and the first two duets. Her bright, ringing tone was fittingly associated with local favorite Michelle Johnson (winner of the Metropolitan Opera National Council’s Grand Prix Auditions), whose Santuzza (in bright yellow) towered over each duet she sang. As Johnson sang his best works of the evening, “And I loved him” and “I’m damned,” laments Diegel finally gained attention during his drinking song, although he chose to perform the track as a series of very short, separate sequences. sentences, giving it a breathtakingly cut lightness.

It was impossible to look away (or ears) from Chelsea Basler’s Lola (dressed in red). Since beginning his association with BLO as an emerging artist in 2013, Basler’s free and flexible soprano voice has been an important part of the productions of Carmen (Micaëla, 2016), Handmaid’s Tale (Moira, 2019), and the recent Operabox.tv production by Phillip Glass The Fall of House Usher (Madéline). Her magnetic stage presence and wide, open legato approach to the city’s flirtatious role helped audiences understand how Turiddu could be torn between two women.

The tragic Alfio of baritone Javier Arrey (in purple and pink) was the discovery of the evening. After his recent debut as Shaunard at the Met, Arrey captured audiences with his overture Prologue and brought new depth to her role in the Mascagni as a cuckold husband. He chose to vary his timbre and volume throughout, adding a surprising undertone to Alfio and making him a clearer victim of the circumstances (in a sense, a dramatic foil more equal to Santuzza).

English captions appeared on two large video screens in large blocks of text supported by an opaque black rectangle, on live close-ups of the singers. While still easy to read, the opacity overshadowed the action a bit too much. Translations proved helpful, but hardly ever continued during text rehearsals, so some longer (repeated) passages only had video elements, without such a clear sense of the story.

Players
Principal flute Ann Bobo shone in the opening orchestral music; she brought intimacy to the orchestral response to Lola’s first scene. Bruce Hall’s solo trumpet playing occupied a highlight of the production: his seemingly effortless, uplifting melodies in Alfio’s first aria and perfectly tuned work during the great hallelujah chorus balance well with the confident contributions of Brendan Shapiro’s legato organ. During these moments, the show completely transported audiences from a modern urban concert space to the interior of a church service in southern Italy.

The playing of the harpist Amanda Romano Foreman was revealed with a beautiful delicacy, but not as close as the winds. The strings, led by solo violin Annie Rabbat and solos Sarah Atwood (violin II), Kenneth Stalberg (viola), Meloanie Dyball (cello) and Robert Lynam (bass), performed with excellent ensemble and flexibility. Their concluding music, supporting the final fall from grace and the collapse of Satuzza, reached power and emotion. The quarter-arc arrangement facing the left of the stage (rather than the usual half-arc around a central point), provided a constant backdrop for the vocal soloists.

Javier Arrey Alfio (photo by Liza Voll)

Reflections from the creative team
Reflecting on BLO’s return to full performance, Stanford Calderwood Acting General and Artistic Director Bradley Vernatter praised not only the resilience of the company’s artists, staff, board and supporters, but also a shared belief in the power of music and storytelling: “The work involved in making a production of this scale is monumental; it requires an accomplished team and a united community. I am proud that BLO kept the artists employed through our digital projects and Street Stage performances during the most difficult days of the pandemic. But it’s especially gratifying to provide so many opportunities for artists and production staff to join us for our first full opera, with a full orchestra and choir for a live audience, since the pandemic.

Playwright Cori Ellison reflects on the influence of this music on popular culture: “Cavalleria rusticana and verism have also made their way into American popular culture. In the climactic scene of The Godfather: Part III (1990) a performance of Cavalleria rusticana in Palermo, Sicily, with the son of opera singer Michael Corleone Anthony as Turiddu, provides an ironic counterpoint to Vincent Corleone’s vengeance against his family’s enemies and an assassination attempt on Michael Corleone. The opera’s symphonic Intermezzo returns in the final scene against the backdrop of Michael’s lonely death. A decade earlier, director Martin Scorsese had also used the Intermezzo as the opening of Angry bull (1980). ”

More to hear
Due to the larger capacity of the room, BLO presents Cavalleria twice, instead of the four performances announced previously (in rehearsal on Sunday at 3 p.m.). Upcoming BLO Presents the Local Premiere of Jazz Opera Champion, mobile performances throughout the city on the Street Stage performance space, and the drama (online) Svadba (marriage) for six a cappella voice, directed by Shura Baryshnikov (season information HERE).

Boston-area opera enthusiasts have plenty of other live productions to look forward to this fall, including two next weekend (Columbus Day weekend): a double lineup of one-act jazz opera from Bernstein Problem in Tahiti and Menotti The phone at Concord next weekend (info HERE). Later in October, the treats include a choreographed concert version of Jody Talbot’s new film Path of miracles by Boston Cecilia and ODC / Dance in Cambridge (info HERE), and two new operas broadcast live from the BU Fringe Festival: Kamala Sankaram’s The infinite energy of Ada Lovelace and Missy Mazzoli’s new opera To prove himself to (info HERE).

Laura Prichard teaches throughout the Boston area as a Certified K-12 Music / Dance / Art Teacher, Theater Pianist (Winchester Cooperative Theater), and University Level (Harvard Libraries, Bunker Hill CC, and previously at Northeastern and UMass). She was Associate Director of the San Francisco Symphony Chorus, which won a Grammy Award from 1995 to 2003, under the direction of Vance George.


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Good Hotel Guide reveals UK’s best hotels for dogs and their owners https://abcingles.net/2021/10/02/good-hotel-guide-reveals-uks-best-hotels-for-dogs-and-their-owners/ Sat, 02 Oct 2021 21:00:00 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2021/10/02/good-hotel-guide-reveals-uks-best-hotels-for-dogs-and-their-owners/ Take your pandemic puppies and loyal four-legged friends on a mini break in Britain. The latest edition of Good hotel guide, the Bible of Hotel Recommendations, offers a select list of the best hotels in the UK for dogs and their owners. 5 Take your pandemic puppies and loyal four-legged friends on a mini-break to […]]]>

Take your pandemic puppies and loyal four-legged friends on a mini break in Britain.

The latest edition of Good hotel guide, the Bible of Hotel Recommendations, offers a select list of the best hotels in the UK for dogs and their owners.

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Take your pandemic puppies and loyal four-legged friends on a mini-break to Britain by visiting one of these dog-friendly hotelsCredit: Getty

Jane Knight unveils them exclusively here.

NO.15 BIG PULTENEY BATH, AVON

CITY hotels aren’t always friendly, but this one behind a Grade I listed Georgian facade is perfect.

Dogs are welcome at the bar, but not at the restaurant, which serves modern English cuisine

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Dogs are welcome at the bar, but not at the restaurant, which serves modern English cuisineCredit: (c) Steve Russell Studios

As well as having unlimited dog treats in the pantry and dog blankets in the contemporary rooms, the hotel is right across from Henrietta Park, which is dog-friendly. And if you’d rather explore Bath on your own, they can book a dog walker or doggy day care for you. Dogs are welcome in the bar, but not in the restaurant, which serves modern English cuisine.

GO: Double rooms B&B cost from £ 195 per night and dogs cost an additional £ 25. Call 01225 807015 or consult guesthousehotels.co.uk.

TY MAWR BRECHFA, CARMARTHEN

ONCE your pooch has explored the acres of gardens that descend to the Marlais River, there are many walks possible in the vast Brechfa Forest bordering the hotel.

There are also doggy days every Monday and Friday at the nearby National Botanic Garden of Wales. Ty Mawr owners Paul Bennett and Melissa Hurley offer information on local walks, as well as dog biscuits and bowls, and a wonderful welcome for all.

Dogs stay free in rooms, some with antiques and wooden beams. Paul prepares an evening meal that changes every night and relies on local supplies.

GO: Double B&B rooms start at £ 130 per night. Call 01267 202332 or consult hotel-pays-de-galles.co.uk.

THE THREE BLACKBIRDS WOODDITTON, CAMBS

The food at this 17th century thatched-roof inn is a cut above for humans and their four-legged friends.

Six of the boutique-style rooms allow dogs

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Six of the boutique-style rooms allow dogs

While owners enjoy dishes such as partridge with mashed celery in the dining room, their pets can enjoy a meal under the table from a menu, including dried venison and Bottom-Sniffer beer or Tailwagger Creek wine (0% alcohol). In a newly built barn at the back, six of the boutique-style bedrooms accept dogs.

GO: Double guest rooms cost from £ 100 per night and dogs cost an additional £ 15. Call 01638 731100 or consult threeblackbirds.co.uk

HARPER LANGHAM, NORFOLK

RETURN from a play to beautiful Norfolk beaches and there is an outside tub and shower to wash away sand and mud from dirty paws, and a basket of towels in the lobby to dry them off.

Then relax in the ink-blue bar, with its plush dog bed among brightly colored velor sofas, old car seats, and recycled piping used for bottle racks.

Dogs are also allowed in the games room on the ground floor, the pleasant courtyard and the spacious bedrooms on the ground floor. Although they are not allowed in the restaurant, food is served at the bar.

GO: Double B&B rooms start at £ 175 per night. Dogs cost an additional £ 25. Call 01328 850000 or consult theharper.co.uk.

PASCHOE HOUSE, CREDIT, DEVON

DO YOU WANT to take your dog but still want to spend some time alone with your other half?

Dogs have their own bed, treats and a toy.  There are walks from the gate or from Dartmoor, a short drive away

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Dogs have their own bed, treats and a toy. There are walks from the gate or from Dartmoor, a short drive away

Cue doggy day care, which can be arranged at this quirky country house hotel, which features sugar pink walls on the staircase, butterfly wallpaper in the living room, and antiques scattered throughout.

Dogs have their own bed, treats and a toy. There are walks from the gate or from Dartmoor, a short drive away.

Upon your return, you will find heated wood stoves and towels to wipe up dirty paws.

Dogs are allowed in the library bar and in the morning room, but not in the restaurant.

But while you indulge in a tasting menu using ingredients from the walled garden, book some dog dinner treatments for them if they can’t stand being alone.

GO: B&B rooms start at £ 179 per night with an additional £ 15 per dog. Call 01363 84244 or consult paschoehouse.fr.

WIDBROOK GRANGE BRADFORD-ON-AVON, WILTS

GIVE Fido the perfect day with a doggy birthday party at this fun hotel. If your puppy is not partying, he can still enjoy a special snack, with wet food, organic dog biscuits, a puppichino and a tennis ball to take home. There’s even Pawsecco, at £ 5.75 a bottle.

The rooms have access to the garden and a dog bed but you cannot take them into the restaurant, but you can dine with them on the veranda.

GO: Double B&B rooms start at £ 155 per night. Dogs cost £ 15 more and a dog tea costs £ 10.50. Call 01225 864750 or consult widbrookgrange.co.uk

THE SUN INN KIRKBY LONSDALE, CUMBRIA

THIS 400 year old pub located in a shopping town between the Lake District and the Yorkshire Dales is perfect for a break from the dogs.

Pets are welcome in the rooms and at the bar and allowed in the dining room - the dog is also available

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Pets are welcome in the rooms and at the bar and allowed in the dining room – the dog is also available

To get started, your pet will receive a free dog pack with a treat, towel, bowl, and dog trail map – there are plenty of walks in the area. Animals are welcome in the rooms and at the bar and allowed in the dining room. Dog-sitting is also available.

GO: Double B&B rooms start at £ 99 per night. Dogs cost an additional £ 20. Call 01524 271965 or consult sun-inn.info.

Pet parents shout a phrase almost 50 times a year, but can you guess what it is?


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