Modern English – ABC Ingles http://abcingles.net/ Thu, 04 Aug 2022 11:29:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://abcingles.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-4-150x150.png Modern English – ABC Ingles http://abcingles.net/ 32 32 Migrant crossings resume as report warns asylum seekers at risk of exploitation https://abcingles.net/2022/08/04/migrant-crossings-resume-as-report-warns-asylum-seekers-at-risk-of-exploitation/ Thu, 04 Aug 2022 11:29:52 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/08/04/migrant-crossings-resume-as-report-warns-asylum-seekers-at-risk-of-exploitation/ Crossings in small boats in the English Channel resumed Thursday after two calm days. No crossing was recorded Tuesday or Wednesday, according to figures from the Ministry of Defense. A total of 696 people made the dangerous journey on Monday, the busiest day for Channel crossings so far this year, and were taken to the […]]]>

Crossings in small boats in the English Channel resumed Thursday after two calm days.

No crossing was recorded Tuesday or Wednesday, according to figures from the Ministry of Defense.

A total of 696 people made the dangerous journey on Monday, the busiest day for Channel crossings so far this year, and were taken to the Port of Ramsgate due to traffic problems around the Port of Dover.

The Border Force vessel Hurricane brought around 40 to 50 people, including a small number of children, to Dover on Thursday morning, and activity in the English Channel suggested there would be more later in the day.

The news came after a report by the UN High Commissioner for Refugees and the British Red Cross, published on Wednesday, found that critical shortcomings in the UK asylum system mean that people seeking security – including those fleeing modern slavery – risk being threatened. operation.

These include an over-reliance on people having to identify themselves as victims of exploitation and an over-focus on immigration enforcement rather than safety and security. protection, which means that people often feel unable to disclose their experiences.

Inadequate training for government officials, delays in decision-making, substandard housing and insufficient support also leave people vulnerable to poverty and exploitation, the report said.

Research has shown that inadequate support puts people in need of protection at potential risk.

He cites examples of vulnerable asylum seekers forced into modern slavery, including domestic servitude, sexual and labor exploitation and forced criminality.

A report by the UN and the British Red Cross has found that critical gaps in the UK asylum system mean those seeking safety may be at risk of potential exploitation (Gareth Fuller/PA)

(PA wire)

The report concludes: “Direct changes to the asylum procedure would reduce these risks of exploitation by placing security at the heart of the asylum system.

Recommendations include:

– Improved screening at all stages of the asylum procedure to ensure that vulnerabilities and risks are identified and addressed.

– Individual security must take priority over immigration law enforcement to ensure that protection is not sidelined.

– Housing should be safe and secure.

– Decisions need to be made in good time to avoid unnecessary delays and allow people to start rebuilding their lives as quickly as possible.

– Faster support to people after they have obtained a positive asylum decision to help them access housing and financial support.

British Red Cross Executive Director Zoe Abrams said: “We listened to the powerful stories and testimonies of those who best understand our asylum system – people with first-hand experience of life and work with this one.



By putting safety at the heart of our asylum system, we can ensure that people can live in dignity with the support they need while they wait for their case to be decided.

Zoe Abrams, British Red Cross

“They told us that our current system fails to protect vulnerable people and unwittingly puts them at risk of exploitation.

“It doesn’t matter who you are, where you come from or how you got here; people seeking asylum in the UK must be protected. In the debate on migration management, we need to focus not only on enforcement but also on humanity.

“The UK is proud to have helped people fleeing war and persecution – we are privileged as a country to be able to keep people in crisis safe.

“By putting safety at the heart of our asylum system, we can ensure that people can live in dignity with the support they need while they wait for their case to be decided.

A group of people believed to be migrants are brought to Dover, Kent, on board a Border Force vessel (Gareth Fuller/PA)

(PA wire)

The Home Office said it was reviewing the report’s findings.

A spokesperson said: ‘We take the safety and well-being of thousands of people in asylum accommodation very seriously and are committed to ensuring that individuals are protected from crime. abhorrence of modern slavery.

“When we suspect that an asylum seeker is in danger or at risk of being exploited, we will take appropriate action, such as working with the police or supporting someone through the national referral mechanism. We urge all asylum seeker who may be in difficulty to report it immediately.

“Our new plan for immigration will fix the broken asylum system, allowing us to give protection to those who are entitled to it and remove more quickly those who have no right to be here.”

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UK debtors may seek recourse against UK based assets https://abcingles.net/2022/08/02/uk-debtors-may-seek-recourse-against-uk-based-assets/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 20:07:23 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/08/02/uk-debtors-may-seek-recourse-against-uk-based-assets/ Key point English law is always a special situation British government proposals1 only partially implementing the UNCITRAL Model Law on the Recognition and Enforcement of Insolvency-Related Judgments will not affect the “Gibbs Rule”. English law claims survive foreign compromise This means that a creditor of an obligation under English law, who refuses to submit to […]]]>

Key point

English law is always a special situation

British government proposals1 only partially implementing the UNCITRAL Model Law on the Recognition and Enforcement of Insolvency-Related Judgments will not affect the “Gibbs Rule”.

English law claims survive foreign compromise

This means that a creditor of an obligation under English law, who refuses to submit to foreign restructuring proceedings, will continue to enjoy a special status under English law, allowing him to enforce his rights to the assets. of a debtor in the UK. This is the case even if the debtor’s plan of compromise releasing those claims is sanctioned by a court with jurisdiction over the plan, and further, even if the plan enjoys Chapter 15 recognition (see below for the discussion of Chapter 15).

The decision of the 19th century English court2known as “Gibbs’ rule” (“Gibbs“), is the reason.

The British government’s proposals will no doubt cause much consternation abroad. Many debtors will need to continue to consider English law despite the plethora of new restructuring laws being implemented around the world.

The existing law keeps Gibbs Safe and sound

As recently as 2018, the UK Supreme Court said Gibbsholding that the Cross-Border Insolvency Regulations 2006 (UK) (“RCIB“)3 does not go so far as to derogate from the common law of Gibbs.

Moreover, the court stated that any decision to override Gibbs rests, not on her, but on Parliament.

Like a sturdy subterranean creature, Gibbs has stood the test of time.

He challenged the creative arguments of the Queen’s Counsel. In the Bank of Azerbaijan Case4it was unsuccessfully argued that a permanent injunction against creditors’ action in the UK would not reverse Gibbs. The Supreme Court seemed to calm his disagreement. She pointed to the lack of a choice of law provision in the CBIR and concluded that if the CBIR had intended to override the substantive rights of creditors under the applicable law governing their debts, this would have been made explicit. . From a practical point of view, she observed that as an insolvency proceeding, the Azeri Compromise Plan had served its purpose and run its course: creditors who chose to participate in the plan had received their rights under plan. From the debtor’s point of view, the court highlighted the fact that no one was arguing that the plan would not achieve its main objective if the claims of the English creditors were successful: only 5% of the claims of the creditors of the plan were affected by Gibbs.

Gibbs also survived the rebuke of the powerful U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York. In Agrocor5Judge Martin Glenn said that Gibbs should be relegated to the history books and given Chapter 15 relief from a Croatian plan of compromise that included claims under English law. He did so after much reasoning and knowing that granting the relief would indeed be contrary to Gibbs. For those unfamiliar, a Chapter 15 order, in cases where the non-US case is filed in the debtor’s primary area of ​​interest, is effective in granting recognition and enforcement in the United States of an alien compromise plan. The order imposes a stay of the creditor’s action against the debtor’s assets and operations located in the United States.

A glimmer of light – norwegian air?

High Court of Ireland at norwegian air6 exercised its jurisdiction to sanction an Irish program under an Irish review, notwithstanding that the English law claims were subject to the compromise. He did so on the basis of the decision of the English court of Re Business City Express [1997] 2 BCLC 510, where the court recognized and applied an Irish plan of compromise although it included claims under English law. The English court relied on Section 426 of the Insolvency Act 1986 (UK) as leading the way.

East Re Business City Express still good law for this point? Does section 426 really go that far? Section 426 has been reviewed more recently.

Section 426 allows a court in the United Kingdom, as well as a court in certain designated foreign jurisdictions (Ireland being one such jurisdiction), to seek assistance from a court in the United Kingdom in a insolvency proceedings. The relevant provisions are as follows, underlined to emphasize salient words:

(1) A passed order by a court in any part of the UK in exercising jurisdiction over insolvency law must be applied in any other part of the UK as if it had been made by a court exercising corresponding jurisdiction in that other part.

(4) The courts competent in matters of insolvency law in all part of the UK must help courts having corresponding jurisdiction in any other part of the United Kingdom or any relevant country or territory.

(5) … a request made in a court in any part of the UK by a court in any other part of the United Kingdom or in a relevant country or territory is the authority for the court to which the request is made to apply, with respect to the matters specified in the request, insolvency law Which one is enforceable by either court in relation to comparable matters within its jurisdiction. In exercising its discretion under this subsection, a court shall take into account in particular the rules of private international law.

Thus, paragraph (5) specifically includes a choice of law clause: it contemplates that the English court will apply the law of England OR of the “relevant country”.

The Irish court must necessarily have relied on subsection (5). However, the UK Supreme Court in Insist on and New capseven held that subsection (5) does not go that far.

In Insist on, the Supreme Court focused on the difference in language used in the three paragraphs. Subsection (1), the court noted, concerns the application orders made by courts in different parts of the UK only. Subsections (4) and (5), on the other hand, relate to the surrender of assistance in a court in the United Kingdom or a relevant country.

Focusing on this difference in language, the Supreme Court held that subsections (4) and (5) do not apply to orders of courts of a relevant country. The Supreme Court said that if subsections (4) and (5) were to be interpreted as giving the court the power to enforce the judgments of the courts of the countries concerned, this would render subsection (1) entirely redundant. Article 426 is therefore not a means of circumventing Gibbs.

There has been no English decision on this point since Insist on. Technically, the Supreme Court’s decision on Section 426 was “obiterThis means he is more likely to be overthrown than if he were crucial to the decision. Insist on is also 10 years old and the question has not been tested since. However, it appears that the Supreme Court’s decision is valid as a matter of statutory interpretation, and the policy has not evolved. This is not to say that Section 426 may not be useful. For example, on a case-by-case basis, it may be worth considering whether it can be used to initiate full proceedings against the debtor (such as an administration) in the UK, potentially facilitating a waiver of debt.

U.S. Chapter 11 plans are also special

A United States Chapter 11 plan of reorganization, however, is effective in binding creditors who benefit from English law claims, notwithstanding Gibbs. It is for the simple practical reason that an order of a United States bankruptcy court sanctioning a Chapter 11 plan takes effect extraterritorially and applies to all creditors, including English law creditors, and that whether or not they submitted to the jurisdiction of the United States court.

Thus, a creditor acting in defiance of a US plan would visit the defiance of a US court decision, with all its consequences. No creditor has yet had the courage to rely on Gibbs in defiance of a sanctioned United States Chapter 11 plan.

There are not many jurisdictions whose compromise plans are expressed to take effect extraterritorially. Fewer still have the power and true global reach of the United States.

What about chapter 15?

We thought Chapter 15 might be a way to subvert Gibbs, but it appears that Chapter 15 (unlike Chapter 11) does not apply extraterritorially. Therefore, the arguments mentioned above regarding Chapter 11 do not apply. Interestingly, the US Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York recently issued a Chapter 15 order regarding a Cayman Compromise Plan that included claims governed by New York law.8. The court recalled that Gibbs has no place in US law.

Choosing between Chapter 11 and a restructuring process in the UK

If the choice comes down to an English or American restructuring solution, what factors should a debtor bear in mind? As trivial as it may seem, the decision must be made on a case-by-case basis. English law might offer a more bespoke solution. Chapter 11, with its global stay, could facilitate a more complete and operational one.


FOOTNOTES

1 The consultation on the proposals closes at the end of September.

2 Gibbs’ rule originated from Antony Gibbs & Sons c. The Industrial and Commercial Company of Metals (1890) 25 QC 399.

3 The CBIR transposes the UNCITRAL Model Law on Cross-Border Insolvency into English law.

4 Re OJSC Azerbaijan International Bank [2018] EWCA Civil 2802.

5 In re: Agrokor dd, et. Al., 591 BR 163 (Bankr. SDNY 2018). See as well Justice Kannan Ramesh, High Court of Singapore, Pacific Andes Resources Development Ltd. [2016] SGHC 210.

6 In Norwegian Air International Ltd. [2021] IEHC 272.

seven Rubin et al v. Eurofinance SA and others and New Cap Reinsurance Corporation (in liquidation) and other c. A. E. Grant and others [2012] UKSC 46.

8 Subject: Modern Land (China) Co., Ltd., Case No. 22-10707 (MG) (Bankr. SDNY).

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Urban Cowboy screenwriter Aaron Latham dies at 78 https://abcingles.net/2022/07/28/urban-cowboy-screenwriter-aaron-latham-dies-at-78/ Thu, 28 Jul 2022 04:32:20 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/07/28/urban-cowboy-screenwriter-aaron-latham-dies-at-78/ Aaron Latham, a magazine writer whose elegant ringside dispatch of a mechanical bull in a Texas honky-tonk saloon inspired “Urban Cowboy,” the 1980 film that evoked the modern American West and became the most notable credit in his extensive literary career, died July 23 at a hospital in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. He was 78 years […]]]>

Aaron Latham, a magazine writer whose elegant ringside dispatch of a mechanical bull in a Texas honky-tonk saloon inspired “Urban Cowboy,” the 1980 film that evoked the modern American West and became the most notable credit in his extensive literary career, died July 23 at a hospital in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. He was 78 years old.

The cause was complications from Parkinson’s disease, said his wife, Lesley Stahl, longtime correspondent for CBS News’ “60 Minutes.”

Mr. Latham was a burly Texan who first rose to prominence on the East Coast in the 1970s, embarking on his magazine career as the movement known as New Journalism was in full bloom. He played softball with Tom Wolfe and Gay Talese—more experienced practitioners of the form—and wrote for Clay S. Felker, the founder of New York Magazine, at both New York Magazine and Esquire.

It was Felker who sent Mr. Latham home to Texas, to a bar called Gilley’s in the Houston suburb of Pasadena, to write the article published in Esquire in 1978 under the title “The Ballad of the Urban Cowboy: America’s Search for True Courage.” Mr Latham delivered a vervy account – straight out of the school of new journalism – of petrochemical workers who swapped their hard hats for cowboy hats and rode a mechanical bull, clinging not just to the beast but also to what Mr Latham described as a demise of the “cowboy code”.

“According to this code,” he wrote, “a cowboy is independent, self-reliant, courageous, strong, direct, and open. All he can demonstrate by dancing the cotton-eyed Joe with the cowgirls, punching the punching bag and riding the bull at Gilley’s. In these anxious days, some Americans have turned to God for salvation, others have turned to fashionable prophets, but more and more people are turning to the cowboy hat.

Mr Latham – who has read Homer and Cervantes, earned a doctorate in English from Princeton and wrote his first book on F. Scott Fitzgerald – noticed what he felt when he arrived at Gilley, much like the anthropologist Margaret Mead “landing for the first time in Samoa, discovering a whole new culture”. But there was also a part of him, he said, that felt “like home.”

Inundated with proposals for films based on the article, Mr Latham set off for Hollywood, “taking transcontinental flights to that cruel city which had abused the talents of Fitzgerald and Faulkner (but was kind to me),” he wrote two decades ago. later in an account published in New York Magazine.

Mr Latham co-wrote the screenplay for ‘Urban Cowboy’ with James Bridges, who was also the film’s director and became his best friend. The film starred John Travolta and Debra Winger as the couple at the center of a modern Western romance. Forty years after its release, Rolling Stone quoted the film as the cultural touchstone that “brought Western fashion and country music into the mainstream.”

Mr. Latham teamed up with Bridges and Travolta again on “Perfect,” a 1985 film loosely based on his “Looking for Mr. Goodbody” article, published two years earlier in Rolling Stone. Largely set in a Los Angeles health club, the article billed gyms as “the new singles bars,” where singles could sound out potential dates at the heart-pounding pace of a workout. In the film version, Travolta played a journalist working on such a story, with Jamie Lee Curtis as his love interest aerobics instructor.

Mr Latham endured what he described as a ‘rainy season’ of his soul when several writing projects failed and he fell into depression which he says nearly drove him to suicide. He came out of his depression, he says, by writing “The Frozen Leopard: Hunting My Dark Heart in Africa” ​​(1991), a travelogue from a safari during which he confronted the existential questions of life and its meaning.

He then wrote a trilogy of Western novels, “Code of the West” (2001), “The Cowboy With the Tiffany Gun” (2003) and “Riding With John Wayne” (2006). In the first two, he transposes the Arthurian legend onto the landscape of Texas, basing the character of Guinevere, he says, on his wife.

John Aaron Latham was born on October 3, 1943 in Spur, not far from Lubbock, in what Mr Latham described in Texas Monthly like “that remote corner of West Texas that’s the last bastion of real cowboys, cattle ranches, rattlesnakes, and tarantula stampedes.”

Although “Urban Cowboy” is largely based on Mr. Latham’s reporting, it also draws inspiration from his life. Travolta’s character Bud remarks at one point that when he was born, his father sold a cash cow to pay the doctor who delivered him. The same, Mr Latham told Newsday, was true for him.

Both of his parents were teachers. His father was also a high school football coach and Mr. Latham had the idea of ​​becoming a football player until an abdominal injury on the field led to the removal of one of his kidneys. His mother wrote and illustrated children’s books.

“She raised me with the idea that writers were the great heroes of the world,” Mr Latham said. says Texas Monthly“and I wanted to be my mother’s hero.”

Mr. Latham is a graduate of Tucson High School. He enrolled at Amherst College in Massachusetts, where he edited the school newspaper and earned a bachelor’s degree in English in 1966. He earned a doctorate from Princeton in 1970. His dissertation was published l following year under the title “Crazy Sundays: F…Scott Fitzgerald in Hollywood.

Mr. Latham found his first job in journalism at the Washington Post, where he interned before becoming an editor. “He stood out for his sophistication and easy manner,” said Leonard Downie Jr., who worked with him in the city office and later became the newspaper’s editor, “not like the scruffy guys around him.”

Among other stories, Mr. Latham wrote a four-part exposé in 1971 on Junior Village, a home for impoverished children in Washington where, investigations later revealed, young residents were drugged, raped and abused.

“It was a classic, independent, penetrating investigation into an institution,” longtime Post reporter Bob Woodward said in an interview, describing the report as “a real head-turner.” Woodward joined the paper months after the expose was published and said he called the Junior Village story one that “embodied the Ben Bradlee approach to journalism”. (Benjamin C. Bradlee was the editor who chaired The Post during the Watergate investigation, led by Woodward and fellow journalist Carl Bernstein, which helped precipitate the resignation of President Richard M. Nixon.)

Mr. Latham later joined Esquire and New York Magazine. Stahl, at the time, was a young reporter for CBS. Both were covering Watergate. Mr. Latham called her one day, looking for leads, and was unceremoniously dismissed.

“Lesley wasn’t thrilled with the request,” he later said. told People magazine. “’How dare you call me home? If you want to talk, call me tomorrow at the office,” she barked, then hung up the phone.

They later met and saw each other regularly, but their romance only blossomed, they said, after Nixon left and they were forced to discuss other matters. They married in 1977.

Besides Stahl, of New York, Mr. Latham’s survivors include their daughter, Taylor Latham of Los Angeles; and two granddaughters.

Mr. Latham’s books included “Orchids for Mother” (1977), a CIA novel, and “The Ballad of Gussie & Clyde” (1997), a memoir of Mr. Latham’s father finding love late in the life. With David S. Ward, he co-wrote the screenplay for a third film, “The Program” (1993), starring James Caan as a struggling college football coach.

Mr Latham also wrote the book for a short-lived musical based on ‘Urban Cowboy’, which premiered on Broadway in 2003. He remained creatively active late in his life, despite suffering more and more Parkinson’s disease. He made his directorial debut in 2016, overseeing a production of Clifford Odets’ boxing play “Golden Boy” which was staged in a New York gymnasium with actors who also have Parkinson’s disease.

“The cowboy is the only truly mythical figure America has created so far,” Mr Latham said. reminded saying himself after the release of “Urban Cowboy”. “It comes to the fore in the culture and then it recedes for a while, but it always seems to reappear when we’re uncertain about the future.”

After his own “personal disappointments”, Mr Latham wrote in New York Magazine in 2000, “I was more than ready to welcome the cowboy into my life”.

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Sylvia Molloy – The Suffolk Times https://abcingles.net/2022/07/25/sylvia-molloy-the-suffolk-times/ Mon, 25 Jul 2022 21:26:47 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/07/25/sylvia-molloy-the-suffolk-times/ Sylvia Molloy Sylvia Molloy of Southold and Manhattan died on July 14, 2022. She was 83. Born August 19, 1938 in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Molloy grew up speaking English, French and Spanish. After obtaining a doctorate in comparative literature from the Sorbonne, Paris, in 1967, she embarked on a distinguished career in the United States […]]]>

Sylvia Molloy of Southold and Manhattan died on July 14, 2022. She was 83.

Born August 19, 1938 in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Molloy grew up speaking English, French and Spanish. After obtaining a doctorate in comparative literature from the Sorbonne, Paris, in 1967, she embarked on a distinguished career in the United States as a researcher, writer, teacher and critic. She was a professor of Spanish at Yale and Princeton universities, where she was among the first women to be tenured, in 1974. At New York University, she held the Albert Schweitzer Professorship in the Humanities, taking her retirement in 2010. In 2007 at NYU, she established the Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing in Spanish, the first program of its kind in the United States

Former president in 2001 of the Modern Language Association of America, she was a member of the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Social Science Research Council and the Civitella Ranieri Foundation, in Umbria, Italy, in 2003.

Molloy was the author of 22 works of criticism, memoir and fiction, published mostly in Spanish, including critical studies of Hispanic literature and writers such as Jorge Luis Borges and the Ocampo sisters, Victoria and Silvina; essays on gender and sexuality; anthologies on autobiography and women’s writing in Latin America; short stories; and two novels.

Residing in Southold since 1991 with Emily Geiger, his partner and wife of 41 years, who survives him, Molloy was a great lover and protector of stray cats, dogs, ducks and chickens, and a creator of delicious desserts.

She is also honored and mourned by two nephews, Regis and Benoit Glorieux of Montreal, Canada; legions of friends; and dedicated students across Latin America, Europe and the United States

This is paid notice.

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23 unique baby boy names that start with “U” https://abcingles.net/2022/07/23/23-unique-baby-boy-names-that-start-with-u/ Sat, 23 Jul 2022 14:00:25 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/07/23/23-unique-baby-boy-names-that-start-with-u/ What do President Ulysses S. Grant, musical artist Usher and sprinter Usain Bolt have in common? Well, not much, other than being one of the few famous people whose name starts with “U”. If you’re looking for a name that really stands out from the crowd, picking a boy name that starts with “U” is […]]]>

What do President Ulysses S. Grant, musical artist Usher and sprinter Usain Bolt have in common? Well, not much, other than being one of the few famous people whose name starts with “U”. If you’re looking for a name that really stands out from the crowd, picking a boy name that starts with “U” is a great way to do it. Baby names that start with “U” don’t even show up on lists of rare and unusual names for boys. “U” may sound like the forgotten vowel, among the most popular O names and if we are talking about consonants, “U” names don’t even come close to the popularity of some other letters. For example, the ever-popular “J” names. The name “James” was the fifth most popular name in 2021, with Jack, Jackson and Jacob close behind. While there may be Jack B., Jack M., and Jack L. in a classroom, your little Uriah or Uzel will likely have his name all to himself.

On the Social Security Administration’s list of the thousand best boy names of 2021, only 2 “U” names make the cut – Uriel comes in at number 498 and Uriah at number 697. So even though the “U” names don’t are maybe not very big in the United States, there are actually a lot of “U” names around the world that have a nice ring and will suit your little boy, who is sure to be a bundle of unique joy.

1

Uria

Despite cracking the top thousand of the most popular boy names of 2021, Uriah is still rare – he’s only been in the top thousand for 24 of the past 122 years, and even then he’s never been in the top 500. It is a biblical name and comes from the Hebrew word meaning “flame of God”.

2

Uziel

Like Uriah, Uziel is a Hebrew name meaning “God is my strength.” With both a “U” and a “Z”, this name has an added cool factor. It is pronounced “oo-zee-el”.

3

Ubayd

Ubayd is pronounced like the phrase “you-bed”. This “U” name appears in the Quran and means “worshipper” or “servant of God”. It could also be spelled “Ubaid” for a slightly different twist.

4

Uriel

Lesley Magno/Moment/Getty Images

Russian Orthodox Christians consider Uriel an Archangel, along with Raphael, Michael and Gabriel. Like Uriah, this name comes from the Hebrew words meaning “light of God” or “fire of God”.

5

Urban

Urban is a super cool choice for a city dweller. The Latin word ‘urbus’ means ‘city’, which is why today we call cities ‘urban areas’. This “U” name has been worn by everyone, from popes – yes, there has been more than one Pope Urban – to rock musicians.

6

Umaid

Umaid is pronounced exactly as it sounds – “you are done”. It means “leader” and “one who loves God”. The name has a regal and noble sound and could be perfect for a little guy with big plans.

seven

Upton

Upton is the best-known U-shaped name of prolific writer Upton Sinclair, whose book The jungle led to a crucial overhaul of food security that still impacts us today. It is an English name meaning “upper town”. One of Upton Sinclair’s quotes is perfect for a little baby to shake things up: “You don’t have to settle for America as you find it. You can change it. I didn’t like the way I discovered America sixty years ago, and I’ve been trying to change it ever since.”

8

Utah

Maskot/Maskot/Getty Images

Utah often tops the list of most gorgeous states, and if you have a special connection to that state, that name might be a perfect fit. You’ll need to put a visit to Zion or Arches National Park on your vacation bucket list as soon as you’re old enough to enjoy it!

9

Utica

Like Utah, Utica is a “place name” name. Utica was an ancient Phoenician city and is a modern city in many states including New York, Kansas, Kentucky, and Illinois. If you have a connection with these cities, you can choose this name. But, even if you’ve never been there, there’s an edgy, cool vibe.

ten

Ulan

In the Twi language, which is spoken primarily in Ghana, Ulan means “firstborn twin” – so keep this in your back pocket if you find you expect more from a new addition to your family.

11

Udell

Witthaya Prasongsin/Moment/Getty Images

Pronounced “ooo-dell”, this English name has the evocative meaning “of the valley of the yew”. Plus, “Dell” is a really cute nickname.

12

Ulysses

Whether you’re a James Joyce fan or love Homer’s ancient story of Odysseus, Odysseus’ name holds a powerful place in ancient and modern literature. It dropped from a thousand names in 2005, so it is still quite rare in the United States.

13

Umberto

The most famous of the Umbertos is surely Umberto Eco, the famous Italian author and critic who died in 2016. The name means “renowned warrior”. If the full name is too long, you can always shorten it to the cute name “Berto”.

14

Umbriel

Pronounced “um-bree-el,” this “U” name would be perfect for a space-loving family. If you choose this name, you may have an astronomer on your hands, since Umbriel is also the name of one of Uranus’ many moons. It comes from the Latin word “umbra” which means “shade” or “shade”.

15

Usain

Atipati Netiniyom / EyeEm/EyeEm/Getty Images

Put on your running shoes as soon as your little Usain starts walking, in case your little one looks like the famous sprinter of the same name. Usain (pronounced “you-sane”) means “beautiful” or “good” in Arabic.

16

Uri

There are two personal names Uri in the Old Testament, and the name is particularly popular in Israel. It also has a magnificent meaning: “My light” or “My flame”.

17

Uffe

Get away, Hugh Jackman, there’s a new human-wolf hybrid in town. Pronounced “oooh-fay”, this cool name means “man-wolf” and has Danish roots and Old Norse origins.

18

You do

ArtMarie/E+/Getty Images

In Igbo (the national language of Nigeria) the name Udo means “peace,“something our world could use more of these days. It’s unusual, but also short and sweet.

19

Ulster

Those with Irish roots may want to consider this name, as Ulster is one of the four provinces of Ireland. It is also both a city and a county of New York. Whether you have a special connection to one of these places, or just like the sound of the name, this could be a great choice.

20

Othman

This Arabic name means “wise” and “intuitive,” and who wouldn’t want their little guy to be both? If you like this name, you can also consider the “U” name “Usman”, which is considered a variant of Uthman.

21

Ulbrecht

This German name sounds like it belongs to a king, or at least a noble. More commonly used as a surname, Ulbrecht means “illustrious” and is pronounced “al-brict”.

22

union

Westend61/Westend61/Getty Images

Union is another name that is more commonly considered a family name. It comes from a Welsh word which means “anvil” and evokes stability and courage.

23

Ubaldo

Pronounced “ooo-ball-doh”, Ubaldo means “bold spirit” in Italian. It’s been owned by everyone from a saint to a major baseball pitcher.

24

Ultan

Saint Utlan was a 7th century Irish monk and yet his name still sounds fresh and modern. It means “Ulster man”.

If you’re sure you want a name that stands out from the crowd, deciding that you’re going to go for a name that starts with “U” is a good way to ensure your baby boy looks truly unmatched. nickname. Any of these ultra-cool names will do.

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The Franciscan Institute awards its highest honor to Dr. Jeremiah Hackett and Dr. Thomas Maloney ​ https://abcingles.net/2022/07/21/the-franciscan-institute-awards-its-highest-honor-to-dr-jeremiah-hackett-and-dr-thomas-maloney/ Thu, 21 Jul 2022 17:34:09 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/07/21/the-franciscan-institute-awards-its-highest-honor-to-dr-jeremiah-hackett-and-dr-thomas-maloney/ Jul 21, 2022 Jeremiah Hackett, professor of philosophy emeritus at the University of South Carolina (Columbia). and Thomas S. Maloney, professor of philosophy emeritus at the University of Kentucky (Louisville), were presented with the Franciscan Institute Medal at St. Bonaventure University by the director of the Institute, Fr. David B. Couturier, OFM Cap. The medal […]]]>

Jul 21, 2022

Jeremiah Hackett, professor of philosophy emeritus at the University of South Carolina (Columbia). and Thomas S. Maloney, professor of philosophy emeritus at the University of Kentucky (Louisville), were presented with the Franciscan Institute Medal at St. Bonaventure University by the director of the Institute, Fr. David B. Couturier, OFM Cap.

The medal is awarded in recognition of meritorious excellence in medieval scholarship and Franciscan studies.

The award was announced at a gathering of scholars at the Roger Bacon Symposium hosted by Zoom at Saint-Bonaventure University. The keynote address for the conference was a lecture by Hackett on the soon to be published joint work by him and Maloney on Roger Bacon’s “Philosophia Moralis”.(Franciscan Institute Publications, 2022).

Hackett’s research interests lie in the areas of history of philosophy, metaphysics, philosophy of mind, epistemology, and moral philosophy. He has published widely and is currently interested in Roger Bacon and Averroism. Recently, he had the honor of receiving a Festschrift, “The Philosophy and Science of Roger Bacon: Studies in Honor of Jeremiah Hackett”, edited by Nicola Polloni and Yael Kedar (Routledge: 2021).

Maloney’s major is medieval philosophy, but he has also taught courses in ancient Greek philosophy and philosophy of religion. He has published widely and his area of ​​research is medieval logic and semantics, with a focus on Roger Bacon. He is working on a new edition and translation into Latin of Bacon’s “Opus minus”. Among his many publications is “Roger Bacon: ‘A Compendium of the Study of Philosophy'” edited by Thomas S. Maloney (Oxford: 2019).

Roger Bacon was a medieval English philosopher and Franciscan friar. Known for his academic distinction, “Doctor Mirabilis“, Bacon is also recognized as the father of the modern empirical method in science.

“The publication of Prof. Hackett’s and Prof. Maloney’s exquisitely annotated translation of the ‘Philosophy Moral marks an important step in the contemporary revival of interest in the interdisciplinary work of Roger Bacon,” said Fr. David. He noted that Bacon’s commitment to exploring the relationship between the liberal arts and their reflection of the divine in the world is particularly relevant to those seeking a holistic/holistic perspective on the role of education in the pursuit of wisdom.

For other recent news about the Franciscan Institute, visit www.sbu.edu/franciscaninstitute.

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About the University: The nation’s first Franciscan university, Université Saint-Bonaventure is a community committed to transforming the lives of our students inside and outside the classroom, inspiring them with a lifelong commitment to service and citizenship. St. Bonaventure was named the 5th regional college value in the North in the 2022 edition of US News and World Report’s College Rankings.

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An epic historical novel dives deep into the less-tested roots of Zionism in Western Europe https://abcingles.net/2022/07/16/an-epic-historical-novel-dives-deep-into-the-less-tested-roots-of-zionism-in-western-europe/ Sat, 16 Jul 2022 11:44:32 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/07/16/an-epic-historical-novel-dives-deep-into-the-less-tested-roots-of-zionism-in-western-europe/ Hamutal Bar-Yosef, 82, was tired of the legitimacy of the State of Israel being questioned or attacked. “As an Israeli, I am insulted and angry when I am asked to justify the existence of my country,” said Bar Yosefretired literature professor and accomplished poet, short story writer and translator. The octogenarian’s response was to write […]]]>

Hamutal Bar-Yosef, 82, was tired of the legitimacy of the State of Israel being questioned or attacked.

“As an Israeli, I am insulted and angry when I am asked to justify the existence of my country,” said Bar Yosefretired literature professor and accomplished poet, short story writer and translator.

The octogenarian’s response was to write his very first novel, a 474-page epic. The tome makes the case for Zionism and Israel as it covers two centuries of the lives of members of a Western European Jewish family in three countries on two continents.

“The Rich: Chronicle of a Jewish Family (1763-1948)” was originally published in Hebrew under the title “Haashirim” in 2017. The English translation by Esther Cameron was released earlier this year.

In an interview from his home in Jerusalem, Bar-Yosef explained his motivations behind the highly sought-after novel about a fictional family, but populated by many real-life historical figures.

“I wanted to write about Zionism and the birth of the State of Israel from an angle that is not usually put forward, an angle that many are unaware of,” Bar-Yosef said.

“When I was growing up, we learned at school about the Holocaust, the pogromsand the young Eastern European socialist halutzim [pioneers] who came [in the late 19th and early 20th century] working the land, and who founded the kibbutzim. But that’s not the whole story,” she said.

“The Rich” by Hamutal Bar-Yosef. The cover of the book features the painting by Moritz Daniel Oppenheim, “The return of the volunteer from the wars of liberation to his family still living according to the old customs”, 1834. (Gefen publishing house)

In his novel, Bar-Yosef examines why Zionism also appealed to a segment of Western European Jews in the 19th and early 20th centuries. It shows how it was these Jews, with their dedicated efforts and financial resources, who made the land purchases in Ottoman and British Mandated Palestine that gave modern Jews an important and critical foothold in their ancient homeland.

Without these facts on the ground, the fledgling state of Israel would have had no base from which to defend itself against invading Arab armies during the 1948 War of Independence.

Bar-Yosef’s novel is divided into three sections, set consecutively in Germany, England, and the Land of Israel (pre-state Israel under British rule). The narrative, however, does not begin in either of these places.

It starts with a Jew in what will become the settlement area of ​​the Russian Empire. His name is Meyer Heimstatt and he lives in Brisk (today Brest in Belarus). Marrying in 1763 at the age of 13 to avoid military conscription, Meyer finds himself standing under the wedding canopy next to a girl he does not know.

Meyer, a peddler, loses this woman when she dies in childbirth, and a second who withers with grief when their son is drafted and killed in the Napoleonic Wars. At that time, the family lived in Trendelburg, near the Prussian city of Kassel.

Meyer marries a third time and has a son named Albert. Thus begins the centenary stay of the family in Germany.

Famous photo of Theodor Herzl on the balcony of Hotel Les Trois Rois in Basel, Switzerland (photo credit: CC-PD-Mark, by Wikigamad, Wikimedia Commons)

Theodor Herzl on the balcony of the Hotel Les Trois Rois in Basel, Switzerland, 1897. (CC-PD-Mark, via Wikigamad, Wikimedia Commons)

As the story moves beyond the lives of the poor, uneducated, and religiously traditional Meyers, it becomes increasingly clear how the Heimstatt family saga is tied to Bar- Yosef and the creation of Israel.

Meyer’s descendants are models for the progression of Western European Jews from poverty to prosperity – and assimilation – as they embrace the advances brought about by the Enlightenment and the Industrial Revolution.

But the achievement of equal civil rights in Western democracies has not immunized these Jews against an age-old and deeply rooted anti-Semitism. Unlike the violent attacks on Jews in Eastern Europe, this was “soft” hatred of Jews, but it was hatred of Jews nonetheless. Eventually some of these Jews turned to Zionism as a solution to what the founder of Zionism Theodore Herzl named “The Jewish Question”.

As the story progresses, Albert Heimstatt falls under the wing of a Jewish family of fabric merchants in Kassel. He marries one of their daughters and eventually takes over the business, making it more successful through expansion and innovation.

Arthur Balfour and the Balfour Declaration. (Wikipedia)

Albert’s wife introduced him to European culture — music, art, languages, museums — but he continued to live by Jewish laws.

The couple’s son, Gotthold, is growing up at a time when the German government says it will only grant equality to Jews if they renounce their particular customs and traditions. Albert believes that wealth and education are essential for Jews to flourish, so he sends Gotthold to the University of Heidelberg to study chemistry, a subject for which he has a natural affinity.

However, after his freshman year, Gotthold comes home with a dueling scar on his cheek and a bad grade in Latin. He does not want to stay at university and prefers to apprentice with his maternal uncle in Cologne, who does chemistry for manufacturing. Gotthold is particularly interested in how to clean up the environment by developing positive and safe uses for industrial by-products.

Consuming a years-long love for his much younger cousin Minna, Gotthold marries her at the age of 19. Although no date is given for the wedding, the account suggests that it was 1866, the year of the Austro-Prussian War, the second war of German unification under Bismarck.

The families hope Bismarck will win the war, as they believe German unification will bring equal rights to Jews.

“We are German in every respect. We just have different holidays and a few different religious customs,” the father of the bride explains.

Author Bar-Yosef explained that the Germans weren’t particularly keen on granting full rights to Jews.

“I read 50 years of debates during the period between the end of the Napoleonic wars and unification under Bismarck [in 1871]and they revealed to me a deep-rooted anti-Semitism,” she said.

Chaim Weizmann (left of center) during a meeting with Arab leaders at the King David Hotel, Jerusalem, April 8, 1933. The photo was taken the day before Passover 1931 during discussions on the sale of land in Transjordan. (Wikipedia)

By the time Minna gave birth to a son named Richard in 1868, she and Gotthold had moved to northern England for better business opportunities. Gotthold chooses not to have his son ritually circumcised.

Gotthold becomes a major chemical manufacturer with operations in Britain and other countries, but this does not protect his family from prejudice. Confronted with anti-Semitism at school, Richard is confused about his identity.

“But I’m not Jewish,” he protests. “My parents aren’t really Jewish either. They don’t go to the synagogue… My parents didn’t circumcise me.

Gotthold and Minna eventually move to London, and Richard studies at Cambridge, concentrating on law and politics. While in Cambridge, he and a friend talk about their desire to be completely accepted as English. They know the political Zionism of Herzl and Baron Edmond de Rothschildfund agricultural settlements for Russian and Romanian Jews in the Land of Israel, but they disagree with the idea of ​​a Jewish homeland in Palestine.

Certificate of 1891 from the bank H. Cahn and Company for the land syndicate of Dorché-Sion. (Courtesy of the David Matlow Collection)

“Once we are finally out of the ghetto, should we go back to a Jewish ghetto in Palestine? I think Jews have a special talent for adapting to any country they live in and becoming just like the people of the country,” says Richard.

Richard marries Violette, a Christian of Huguenot origin, in a church. Richard is elected to parliament while expanding the family manufacturing business. The couple are raising their children Claire and Ralph as Christians.

As Claire and Ralph grow into young adults during World War I, “The Wealthy” shifts the focus from England to the Land of Israel. After a long journey away from Judaism, the Heimstatts reconnected to it through Zionism as a response to the oldest hate in the world.

Bar-Yosef said she was surprised to learn through her research how xenophobic English society was at the time of the First World War. She illustrates this point in the novel by the baseless accusations of war profiteering directed at Richard who, as a loyal government minister, works day and night to procure supplies for the army.

Anglo-Palestine Company Limited Debenture Certificate c. 1909 or before. Funds raised from these debentures financed a loan to Achuzat Bayit for the purchase of the land that would become Tel Aviv. (Courtesy of the David Matlow Collection)

Richard meets World Zionist Organization President Chaim Weizmann, and became a supporter of Zionism. He makes significant financial contributions and raises funds from other people. But he is not a fan of the efforts of the Jewish National Fund (JNF) buy land in Palestine in trust for the Jewish people. He was a firm believer in private property and bought his own land for an agricultural colony and planned to build a villa there for his retirement.

Richard’s daughter Claire, who married a Jew, sometimes joined her father on Zionist fundraising trips to America. Son Ralph arrives in Palestine as a British soldier and decides to stay – first as administrator of the British Mandate, then as founder of “Heimstatt Hill”, a fictional settlement reminiscent of Petah Tikva.

This last section of the novel deals with the complex relations between Jews, absent effendis (wealthy Arab landowners), fellah (Arab farmers) and Bedouin regarding the sale and purchase of land in Palestine between 1917 and 1948.

Hamutal Bar-Yosef. (Dan Porges)

“I learned a lot about this from the oral histories of Jews who bought or helped buy land from Arabs during the British Mandate period at Hebrew University,” Bar-Yosef said.

She gained an understanding of the economic factors behind the effendis to sell, and the Zionists to buy. The Jews had ideological motivations, but buying land in Palestine was also a good financial investment.

“The Wealthy” is a novel of descriptions and dialogues. The characters don’t share their inner thoughts and the narrative voice is non-judgemental. The author herself called the style of the book “dry” and “unmotivated”.

“I represent historical processes with this novel,” Bar-Yosef said.

The historical detail in “The Wealthy” makes up for the lack of emotional drama. The book is the author’s chosen vehicle for defending his country and arguing that Jews living in Western democracies needed – and still need – a Jewish homeland in Israel as much as Jews in other parts of the world.

Moreover, had it not been for the well-connected, educated, and wealthy Western Jews like the fictional Heimstatts who support Zionism, the real story might have turned out differently.

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Jane Austen’s ‘Persuasion’ gains popularity https://abcingles.net/2022/07/14/jane-austens-persuasion-gains-popularity/ Thu, 14 Jul 2022 13:37:31 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/07/14/jane-austens-persuasion-gains-popularity/ Comment this story Comment There are many questions a person might have after watching the teaser from the new Netflix adaptation of “Jane Austen”Persuasion“, which begins streaming on Friday. What’s going on with the “Fleabag” asides? Did the term “ex” really exist in the early 1800s in Britain? And is Dakota Johnson’s bright-eyed, irreverent Anne […]]]>

Comment

There are many questions a person might have after watching the teaser from the new Netflix adaptation of “Jane Austen”Persuasion“, which begins streaming on Friday.

What’s going on with the “Fleabag” asides? Did the term “ex” really exist in the early 1800s in Britain? And is Dakota Johnson’s bright-eyed, irreverent Anne Elliot a brilliantly modern portrayal or a blasphemous crime?

But for me, there is a different question that has obsessed me for two years.

Why did ‘Persuasion’ – Austen’s long-neglected and underappreciated latest novel about a regrettable near-bachelor – suddenly have a moment?

I started noticing the phenomenon in the summer of 2020. The stresses of lockdown and the constant death terror meant all you could do was ask people what they were reading. And everyone, it seemed, was suddenly reading “Persuasion.”

I had felt the same pull. In the land of Austen’s novels, there are the Big Three: “Pride and Prejudice,” “Reason & Sensitivity” and “Emma.” They are a crowd pleaser with name recognition, volumes of fan fiction, millions of movie remakes.

Against the overflowing energy of those novels, “Persuasion” can be a melancholy book: it centers on Anne Elliot, the sensible second daughter of an aristocrat, who falls in love with a poor sailor but is persuaded by her snobbish family to end their engagement. . Eight years later, she’s a regrettable bachelor with money troubles; he is a successful and wealthy naval officer. Circumstances bring them back together.

About the time others started baking bread and growing green onions, I reread “Persuasion.” And my lifelong appreciation for this novel has grown into a deep and lasting delight. I listened to the audiobook on long walks, texted quotes to friends, flipped plot points in my head in the shower. (I was so immersed in this novel that I even aspired to do a podcast on “Persuasion.”)

Then, in September 2020, the mystery deepens. “Persuasion” became a movie.

Except, not this movie. another movie, produced by Searchlight Pictures and with Sarah Snook, who plays Shiv Roy on HBO’s “Succession.” Netflix announced its own “Persuasion” adaptation in April 2021, just months before the Bedlam Theater Company set to stage the play in New York. An adaptation, mind you, that was different from the new theatrical adaptation shown in London and Oxford earlier this year.

(The Persuasion field became so crowded that Searchlight Pictures suspended production, Snook told Vogue Australia.)

See? This 205-year-old book is suddenly in tune with the times. And I wanted to hear some theories on why.

“It’s a book about determining your priorities,” said Alice Victoria Winslow.

Winslow co-wrote the new Netflix movie. She’s loved the book since college, when she took a class from Jane Austen and lamented that there weren’t newer, more popular film adaptations. (His writing partner, Ron Bass, is a script legendknown for producing box office hits such as “My Best Friend’s Wedding” and “My Stepmother”.)

Anne is accessible to modern readers: she is older, more contemplative and must choose between her priorities: the man she loves, the friend and mentor she appreciates, and the snobby family she feels compelled to take care.

“She’s kind of not preoccupied with the need to get married,” Winslow said. “There’s just a lot going on for her that’s outside of the marriage plot as an aspiration.”

Damianne Scott sees another corollary to our pandemic era: caregiver fatigue.

Scott, who teaches English composition at two Cincinnati colleges, is the creator of the Facebook community “The black girl loves Jane.” She’s also writing her own novel, a modern take on — what else? — “Persuasion”, located in a Black Mega Church.

Scott points out that Anne is a caregiver. She spends much of the book appeasing her sisters, treating various family members after serious injuries, and serving as her family’s de facto household manager and financial planner. Getting stuck in these roles sharpens her regret of the alternative life she could have lived as the wife of a naval officer.

“A lot of people, myself included, are in helping roles [that] they didn’t choose,” Scott said. “But life and circumstances forced them to be. And so people can also identify with Anne in this notion.

Perhaps the part of “Persuasion” that resonates most now is the time the protagonist is stuck thinking – it’s been almost eight years since she’s seen Captain Wentworth, and she’s spent every day contemplating her other life, wondering if she’s wasting her current one.

“The novel is so obsessed with time,” said Stefanie Markovits, who teaches English literature at Yale. “And in my opinion, that is what best reflects the moment we find ourselves in.”

The pandemic has made us aware of time in the same way: the feeling that the last two years and more have passed so quickly, or so slowly; the loss of precious moments with the people we love; the need to understand how we have grown (or not) since the beginning of this difficult period.

When – spoiler alert – Anne finally reunites with Wentworth at the end of the novel, there’s “a desire to at least imagine that those eight years haven’t been wasted,” Markovits said.

“Are they happier now than they would have been, or not? We do not know. Anna doesn’t know. She doesn’t pretend to know,” she said. “And yet she will try to salvage some kind of sense of how time has passed.”

“That’s what we’re all looking for now, isn’t it?” Markovits added. “We are looking for silver linings for this experiment.”

This real and profound loss is perhaps why the review of this new film and its irreverent, more sarcastic tone felt so impassioned.

The Independent called him “vaguely mortifying to watch.” The Guardian declared it “a parody”.

“I don’t understand”, novelist and essayist Brandon Taylor written in a scathing essay on the movie. “It’s like they’re watching Persuasion and they’re like, let’s turn this into a real love story, but they took out all the parts that make it a real love story.”

The audience for this film is not averse to sweeping reinterpretations of Austen’s novels. This year’s “Fire Island,” a queer, gendered, yet deliciously earnest retelling of “Pride and Prejudice,” won rave reviews, as did 2020’s tangy, zippy remake “Emma,” in which full regency bare buttocks were revealed to the audience.

When I asked Winslow about the trailer’s backlash, she was magnanimous.

“I deeply love this book. And everyone involved in this project deeply loves the book. We all have a deep and long emotional connection to the material. So nothing was done carelessly,” Winslow said. “And I hope everyone comes with an open mind…and understands that Austen has such a playful spirit.”

After two years of the pandemic, perhaps “Persuasion” fans aren’t feeling upbeat. We feel sad and overwhelmed with grief, and tired and taken for granted, with clear eyes on what we’ve lost and the stakes of the time we have left. And we want to see our own melancholy reflected on us.

We know what Anne Elliot went through. Because we too have been there.

A note to our readers

We participate in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to allow us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliate sites.

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Inside Brazil’s 40-year rise to world surfing dominance https://abcingles.net/2022/07/11/inside-brazils-40-year-rise-to-world-surfing-dominance/ Mon, 11 Jul 2022 04:00:20 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/07/11/inside-brazils-40-year-rise-to-world-surfing-dominance/ In the blazing Brazilian sun, as he rode through a perfectly chipping wave, pro surfer Filipe Toledo thumped his chest and screamed towards the beach. Toledo, 27, who grew up about 250 miles west of that stretch of sand, had just won his second World Surfing League Championship tour of the year. The victory, in […]]]>

In the blazing Brazilian sun, as he rode through a perfectly chipping wave, pro surfer Filipe Toledo thumped his chest and screamed towards the beach. Toledo, 27, who grew up about 250 miles west of that stretch of sand, had just won his second World Surfing League Championship tour of the year. The victory, in Saquarema, Brazil, cemented his place as the highest-ranked male surfer in the world, and he took a big step closer to winning the men’s world championship.

On the shore, thousands of fans roared. Once again, the Brazilians celebrated the success of a Brazilian surfer, and they were under the spell of a collective triumph.

Just 10 years ago, a Brazilian victory against a list of the best surfers in the world would have been an anomaly. For decades, Brazilians have been the underdogs of the surfing world with few stars. But from the 1990s, a combination of economic policy, a rich talent pool, a system of regional competitions and two men who created a long-term plan to produce the country’s first world champion changed their trajectory.

Toledo first announced his intention to become a professional surfer when he was 6 years old. He dreamed not only of making the elite round, but also of being alongside renowned world champions like the American Kelly Slater, 11 times world champion, and the Australian Mick Fanning, three-time champion. That Toledo – who is known for his ability to launch over the lips of the waves, turn and land seemingly with ease – had such outsized ambition was overblown. The idea that a Brazilian could not only qualify for the tour, but actually win the tour – to beat the Californians, Australians and Hawaiians, who had dominated for decades – seemed far-fetched.

Yes, the young surfer had talent. Like his peers, he started participating in the regional contests which helped the current generation hone their skills and push each other to new heights. He also had the advantage of being trained and advised by his father, Ricardo, a former national surfing champion. And he was earning a lot. But the distance between winning at home against other promising players and winning regularly against the Slaters and Fannings of the world was still impassable.

Brazilian pro surfers “just didn’t have a lot of information or support,” Filipe Toledo said. “They were like, ‘What do I do now? Should I just train or should I take the money that I made from this event and spend it, have a big party or l invest in travel?

In December 2014, the unthinkable happened: Gabriel Medina from the Maresias district of São Sebastião, aged 20, became the first Brazilian to win the world title on the professional circuit. He did it on the last day of the Pipe Masters event. Oahu’s North Shore erupted: Hundreds of people rushed to carry Medina to the podium; others sang the Brazilian anthem; still others waved national flags.

For Toledo and his peers, Medina’s victory was the start of a sea change in professional surfing. After decades of pushing the boundaries of the sport’s top echelon, Brazil have gone from longshot to global giant. Brazilians have won the world championship title in 2015, 2018, 2019 and 2021. Last summer, a Brazilian, Ítalo Ferreira, won the first men’s Olympic gold medal in the men’s shortboard competition. And at the end of June in Saquarema, the the semi-finals were stacked with Brazilians alone.

This generation is so dominant, so undeniable, that it has earned a nickname: Tempestade Brasileira, which is Portuguese for Brazilian storm.

This successful weather system, however, was anything but accidental. It was the result of a confluence of factors: political transformation, economic policy and a decades-long plan to produce not only Brazil’s first world champion on this tour, but also a talent pool to support him. The plan worked.

Surfing has long been part of the country’s culture. In 1976, the year the modern surfing tour began, Brazil got its first taste of surfing glory when Pepe Lopes won the championship’s first event, in Rio de Janeiro.

However, Brazil was still under dictatorship. Its combination of a closed economy, the high cost of travel, and protectionist policies has prevented foreign investment and would-be surfers. Resources were also scarce. Like athletes in other sports, professional surfers need coaches, trainers and equipment. But unlike other sports, the playing field of surfing is ever-changing. To be competitive on the circumnavigation, professional surfers need experience in a variety of waves all over the world – especially the heaviest waves that break in remote places like Hawaii, Fiji, Tahiti and Indonesia. .

This obstacle has not only contributed to a skills deficit among Brazilian surfers, but also to a collective inferiority complex.

Carlos Burle, a Brazilian big wave surfer who grew up competing in his home breaks, said top Brazilian surfers just need enough money to travel the best waves in the world to stand a chance. to be competitive.

It wasn’t until the late 1980s that a handful of men broke through and gave Brazilian surfing a new sense of confidence. Fábio Gouveia, Flávio Padaratz and, later, Flavio’s brother Neco and Victor Ribas were stars who not only made the elite round but also competed against their unexpected counterparts.

Yet Gouveia, Padaratz and the legion of surfers they inspired faced a wave of political upheaval and economic turmoil. In 1985, Brazil’s 20-year dictatorship came to an end, ushering in all the promise of a young democracy. Instead, the country was thrust into the grip of crippling inflation. For surfers like Gouveia, winning competitions was more a matter of financial survival than professional success, let alone a world title.

In the early 1990s things started to change. Brazil’s president from 1990 to 1992, Fernando Collor de Mello, called on a group of scholars to create a set of stabilizing policies, and by the time Toledo was born in 1995, Brazil had a thriving middle class. In the early 2000s, when Toledo and the future Tempestade were surfing their first contests, including a strong circuit of amateur contests, spending on goods and travel (e.g., new surfboards or tickets to Hawaii) was on the rise. rise.

Those conditions were part of what got surfers like Burle up in big wave surfing, a discipline separate from the sport that also requires a lot of travel. In 2009, he won the first ever world big wave title, breaking the Brazilian mold. This would prove to be a prelude to what was to follow.

Brazil’s newly fertile economic conditions began to attract foreign investment and business, including the growing surfing industry. Cuan Petersen, then Oakley’s chief marketing officer, was part of this wave. In Brazil, he said, “everyone surfs”, adding: “We could be in a surf spot in the middle of nowhere and there would be 50 people there.” Petersen teamed up with Luiz Campos, an Oakley sports agent and marketing executive who became the godfather of modern Brazilian surfing.

Following the playbook of how corporations marketed American and Australian surfers, Campos and Petersen created a system to develop and nurture Brazilian surfing talent. They didn’t just want to cultivate surfers who could compete on the world stage. They planned to produce Brazil’s first world champion on the championship tour. In the early 2000s, their program, called Mar Azul, or blue sea in Portuguese, was operational. They recruited young surfers and provided them with physical trainers, coaches, a psychologist, a doctor, English lessons and media training.

Mar Azul’s list now reads like a who’s who of the best surfers: Adriano de Souza (world champion in 2015); Ferreira (world champion in 2019 and gold medalist in Tokyo); Toledo; as well as surfers like Caio Ibelli, Miguel Pupo and Jadson Andre, all of whom are on the world championship tour. (Toledo trained with his father and Medina trained with his stepfather, but regularly competed with and against the Mar Azul crew.)

A nation’s competitive aspirations have been completely transformed. Brazilian surfers are expected to take the top spots and up-and-coming Brazilians to join the tour. Both of these expectations were met. And unlike the early days of the Tempestade, the expectations of up-and-coming surfers are already very high.

“We understand the formula now,” said Toledo, who finished their 2021 season in second place behind compatriot Medina, who won their third world championship.

This formula – the alchemy of economics, opportunity, work ethic and expectation – has driven not only Toledo’s professional success so far, but also what he still believes is possible. . Considering the rest of his season, he only has two goals in mind.

“Enjoy the process,” he said. “And win the world title.”

After June’s Oi Rio Pro competition, his once lofty goal looks a lot less like hubris. Instead, it looks more like a probability.

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Five takeaways from Australia v England https://abcingles.net/2022/07/09/five-takeaways-from-australia-v-england/ Sat, 09 Jul 2022 13:23:53 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/07/09/five-takeaways-from-australia-v-england/ Following England’s 25-17 victory over Australia in their July international, here are our five takeaways from the game in Brisbane on Saturday. The top line As the games to win for England unfolded, this performance pretty much came under scrutiny as they leveled the three-game series against Australia in a rather messy and messy affair […]]]>

Following England’s 25-17 victory over Australia in their July international, here are our five takeaways from the game in Brisbane on Saturday.

The top line

As the games to win for England unfolded, this performance pretty much came under scrutiny as they leveled the three-game series against Australia in a rather messy and messy affair at Suncorp Stadium .

It was a win based on doing everything slightly better than last week, with the rolling maul and breakdown physics the hallmarks of their victory. England’s best player Billy Vunipola crashed and was hit and was rewarded with a try, while skipper Courtney Lawes put on a massive display on the blind flank, helping himself with turnovers, grappling touchdown and carry after carry.

The first half saw England look much sharper in feet and in spirit than last weekend, with debutant Jack van Poortvliet starring and making big decisions at a high pace. His Tigers team-mate Guy Porter put on a quietly brilliant display in defence, really closing the holes in the 13/14 channel that Australia exploited so well last weekend.

For Eddie Jones, it was a game he and his team could not afford to lose. They’ve scratched up a win, but there’s still a lot of work to do on offense if they are to challenge the best teams in the world.

What changed?

Both Owen Farrell and Marcus Smith seemed to be playing similar scripts today – if those who were slightly more brash were voiced than Harlequins voiced. They played smart and in the right areas and saved 20 minutes of Australian pressure in the second half, they got their exit strategy.

England also won the aerial battle, with Freddie Steward, Jack Nowell and Tommy Freeman outstanding in defense and kickoff return. Nowell was a pain in the Wallaby side all day, often doing the job of an open flanker, sometimes doing the job of a right wing, and sometimes doing the job of a number eight. He may not have premium gas, but his work rate and commitment are to be applauded.

The biggest change, however, was in defense. As mentioned, Porter has had a fabulous season for Leicester and his ability to shut down the corner defense has stopped the big Australian midfield runners who finished nine and 10. He sticks with his man, stays parallel to the goal line and not once did he make a mistake in the key defensive position from the baseline.

However, the two things that still let England down are their contact handling in the opposing red zone and their propensity to give up the ball through silly disciplinary fouls.

Pieces together

England pretty much shaded it at scrum time, and Ellis Genge and Will Stuart both had rumble gains in the loose, with Bath’s tight header in particular carrying at its best. Despite the efforts of world class Taniela Tupou, who popped up from close range for the Wallaby opener, the battle between him and Genge was a belt one, often forcing referee Andrew Brace to flip a coin to decide who was the winner. disbeliever.

But at the time of the touch, it was a mixed bag. The maul worked wonderfully and was an absolute hallmark of the English game. Their try came from such a move with a brilliant hold and forward pass for Billy Vunipola to move around and over the try line. However, Matt Philip once again put pressure on some big names by netting four interceptions on the night which will really concern England given the importance of their line-up moves.

Work in England

It’s rude to criticize a win, especially such an important win in the context of recent English results, but the England backline really failed to pull off a remarkable shot in attack. All of their momentum came from the direct flat run of the named carriers and there was no way to see Freeman and Henry Arundell free run in any type of space or ground motion.

There were also times when you wondered if England had stopped being positive, whether in defence, from set pieces or from kicks. Playing attacking rugby is a state of mind and when England decide to go into dipping mode they are absolutely at their weakest.

Many times, when he was awarded a penalty, when he was emotionally at the top and in great territorial positions, Farrell chose to strike on goal because he just didn’t trust finishing ambitions. from England. Against the top teams, 14-point margins can be knocked down in the modern game now and England must find a way to score more points.

The week ahead

Both teams have a number of injury bulletins to sweat over, with Maro Itoje high on the list of players Jones will want back. Australia will be equally tense over Jordan Petaia who looked distinctly groggy when he left. Post-game HIA protocols will inform both players’ chances, but that doesn’t look good either.

But with the series at an all and with one to go, this three-match tour couldn’t have been better organised. Sydney host these two great sides next Saturday and despite the Wallabies’ second-half excellence in both Tests, England could well be favorites to win the series 2-1.

READ MORE: Five takeaways from New Zealand v Ireland as tourists claim memorable win

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