Modern English – ABC Ingles http://abcingles.net/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 18:15:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://abcingles.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-4-150x150.png Modern English – ABC Ingles http://abcingles.net/ 32 32 Closure of UK tax offices in rundown towns jeopardizes leveling scheme https://abcingles.net/2022/01/21/closure-of-uk-tax-offices-in-rundown-towns-jeopardizes-leveling-scheme/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 18:03:43 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/01/21/closure-of-uk-tax-offices-in-rundown-towns-jeopardizes-leveling-scheme/ Last October’s decision to close the HM Revenue & Customs tax office in the deprived town of Bootle in north-west England was nothing short of a hammer blow to business Nadeem Patel’s newsagent. After two difficult years battling the coronavirus pandemic, the decision saw more than 1,000 jobs relocated to nearby Liverpool city centre. Patel […]]]>

Last October’s decision to close the HM Revenue & Customs tax office in the deprived town of Bootle in north-west England was nothing short of a hammer blow to business Nadeem Patel’s newsagent.

After two difficult years battling the coronavirus pandemic, the decision saw more than 1,000 jobs relocated to nearby Liverpool city centre. Patel said customers at his store in the New Strand shopping center had fallen by 50% on some days, with lucrative cigarette sales falling by almost two-thirds.

“We stopped selling sandwiches because nobody comes to lunch or have cigarettes anymore,” he said. “We really feel the drop in attendance. Every day, I wonder what the future holds for us.

The opposition Labor Party said the closure of the Bootle Revenue Office – part of a nationwide restructuring by HMRC – goes against the ‘levelling’ promise of the Tory’s 2019 election manifesto aimed at redistribute wealth more evenly, especially in the North of England and the Midlands.

Under HMRC planwhich dates back to 2015, 170 smaller and aging tax offices in cities and towns are being closed, consolidating most of its 65,000 in 13 regional centers in major cities, such as Liverpool Birmingham and Manchester.

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Restructuring has continued since Boris Johnson became British Prime Minister in July 2019, although his Conservative party won a landslide election victory later the same year, propelled by a mass defection from Labor voters in parts of the country. targeted by the leveling promise. .

Johnson had promised to breathe economic life into what he dubbed the UK’s “left behind” towns. But during his tenure, more than 7,700 HMRC jobs have moved to regional hubs in already prosperous towns, according to data provided by the Public and Commercial Services Union.

Places affected include the English towns of Shipley (924 HMRC jobs lost), Stockton-on-Tees (375), Preston (335) and Grimsby (117), as well as the town of Sunderland (243) and Wrexham (249) in Wales.

Further closures are expected over the next two years in Cumbernauld and Dundee in Scotland, and Nottingham, Peterlee and Salford in England.

Lisa Nandy, shadow upgrading secretary, said the move had “stripped” cities of thousands of good, skilled jobs. “The leveling is starting to look like nothing more than a scam gimmick, giving us little pots of money to spruce up our main streets while taking away the good jobs that support them,” she said.

Union representative Dave Gibbons says an alternative office block could have been found in Bootle © Colin McPherson/FT

“You would think that in the context of a ‘race to the top’ the government might want to reassess,” said Peter Dowd, Labor MP for Bootle, standing under the now vacant Triad office building. “But they just kept going regardless.”

HMRC said in a statement that the strategy would help the government’s “modernization plans” and was part of promoting growth and job opportunities in every region.

According to Dave Gibbons, a local PCS representative, the Triad building itself – an eerie 1970s tower – will not be mourned by HMRC staff. But he said a modern alternative could have been found at Bootle.

The Triad office building in Bootle, which was used by HMRC © Colin McPherson/FT

When a third HMRC office in Bootle closes in October, it will leave Liverpool, a culturally vibrant city with myriad attractions worth £3.3billion a year to the economy, home to 4,000 office staff taxes.

Bootle, which has neighborhoods in the top 1% of the UK, has no such attractions. Ironically, the struggling Merseyside city was rejuvenated in the 1960s and 1970s by moving government offices to the area. “It’s like they flipped a switch and sent it into reverse,” Dowd said.

Bootle includes some of the most deprived areas in the UK © Colin McPherson/FT

There has also been no review of HMRC’s restructuring after the government announced plans to move civil servants from London to northern cities in 2020.

Last year Michael Gove, while still Cabinet minister responsible for policy, said the pledge would involve moving 22,000 civil servant jobs out of London by 2030 under the leveling scheme .

Gove, who has since become upgrade secretary, said the plan to open major offices outside London, including a Treasury center in Darlington and a new base for the Foreign Office in East Kilbride, would ensure that policies were “developed and implemented by people from local communities”.

In reality, however, public service jobs have been created much faster in London than elsewhere over the past two years, with a spike in policy experts to deal with Brexit and the Covid-19 pandemic. .

Since the Tories took power in 2010, there has been a net increase of 15,401 civil servants in London and a net decrease of 58,005 elsewhere in the UK, according to official figures.

Bootle MP Peter Dowd: ‘It doesn’t matter that jobs are moving ‘just down the road’, as the government likes to put it. Having 2,000 people in one place, five days a week, was a significant amount of money for the local economy” © Colin McPherson/FT

Martin Kelsey, group secretary for HMRC workers at PCS, said the Revenue Authority shutdown program was “not compatible” with the vision set out by Gove.

“Gove is making this big, big statement, but the reality of what we are dealing with at HMRC is very different. We’ve seen thousands of experienced staff leave since 2015 because of people who couldn’t get to these regional hubs,” he added.

The Department of Leveling, Housing and Communities declined to comment.

HMRC offered Bootle staff a chance to find other civil service jobs. There is also travel support for staff moving to Liverpool and the option to work from home two days a week. He said the Liverpool hub offered “safe and modern working spaces”.

Trade at the Strand Shopping Center has fallen sharply since HMRC moved staff out of town © Colin McPherson/FT

Bootle suffered a further blow last March when Santander Banking Group, another major local employer, announcement it was pulling. The city’s request for a £17m regeneration grant from the new government Upgrade funds was also rejected.

Dowd said it was cold comfort that HMRC jobs had been moved just four miles from Liverpool. “It doesn’t matter that jobs are moving ‘just down the road’, as the government likes to say. Having 2,000 people in one place, five days a week, was a significant amount of money for the local economy.

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DVIDS – News – LEAP Spotlight: Major Timothy Bettis https://abcingles.net/2022/01/19/dvids-news-leap-spotlight-major-timothy-bettis/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 18:50:00 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/01/19/dvids-news-leap-spotlight-major-timothy-bettis/ “I studied Spanish in high school in part to reconnect with the language and culture of my late grandfather, an Army Air Corps and United States Air Force veteran. that learning Spanish ultimately helped me understand English grammar, but more importantly it helped me develop a mental framework for learning a new language that I […]]]>

“I studied Spanish in high school in part to reconnect with the language and culture of my late grandfather, an Army Air Corps and United States Air Force veteran. that learning Spanish ultimately helped me understand English grammar, but more importantly it helped me develop a mental framework for learning a new language that I immediately applied elsewhere.

“I was really interested in the Arabic language, but growing up in rural Minnesota, formal opportunities to study Arabic were non-existent. Thanks to a World Language Day sponsored by the University of Minnesota, I traveled at their Minneapolis campus alongside other high school students and attended sample Arabic, Chinese, and Ojibwe lessons, which is where I was introduced to Dr. Hisham Khalek, now holder of the ARDI Chair in Arabic Studies at the US Air Force Academy, but later served as a language teacher at several institutions in the Twin Cities.In 2007, I enrolled in my first formal Arabic course with Dr. Khalek at the University of St. Thomas Thanks to him, I was also able to travel to Lebanon in 2008, my very first adventure outside the United States.

“I graduated in 2011 from the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota with a degree in International and Middle Eastern Studies. The highlight of my college experience was studying abroad. in the Levant, where I traveled between Jordan, Israel, Palestine and Syria.

“I was appointed to the USAF through the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps in 2011 and became an intelligence officer. From 2013 to 2016, I cut my teeth in my first operational units , where I was responsible for supporting the MQ-1 and MQ-9 crew mission sets.

“I discovered LEAP in 2013-2014 during my first operational tour, thanks to my captain at the time, Captain James Lodge, who knew that I would be a shoo-in for the program. I was interested in LEAP because it provided me with a formal opportunity to maintain and sharpen my Arabic language while serving in a high-tempo operational mission that included shift work.

“While Las Vegas was a great city to live in, the opportunities to use my Arabic in the local community did not arise. regional to apply The USAF allowed me to develop a set of skills relevant to the DOD mission that I could use at a later date A professional development program that is inherently proactive in the way it selects and trains Airmen is a breath of fresh air in an institution fueled by a vigorous pursuit of inclusion and diversity.

“This period also coincided with the height of the Arab Spring, which led to significant internal unrest in the region. Operating through CENTCOM, I found myself the only officer in my operations group with academic and practical experience across the Middle East that was not gained behind barbed wire. This propelled me into a position where I became the de facto regional advisor to my Squadron Commander, where I helped add historical and cultural context to his and his boss’s decision-making.

“I have taken eMentor courses for Modern Standard Arabic and various dialects including Levantine and Syrian Arabic. The AFCLC’s ability to be forward-thinking and enable USAF students to adapt their program to anticipate future DOD needs is very important The bottom-up nature of this program allows students to be more nimble in matching their interests and abilities to emerging DOD needs more than a top-down requirements-based bureaucracy could never be.

“In 2016, I was reassigned to 9th Air Force Headquarters as a Command Intelligence Briefer. Shortly thereafter, 9 AF HQ was tagged by the Army Chief of Staff of the air, General Goldfein, to set up the first-ever capable headquarters of a joint task force in the USAF.I, then just a captain, became the de facto intelligence advisor to the 2-star commander for help guide and assemble the intelligence direction of this Joint Task Force. Due to the strict protocols for controlling and sharing intelligence information, I quickly turned this into an opportunity to shape the JTF to be ready for the coalition from day one, establishing an overseas disclosure office, bringing in an exchange officer from the UK and preparing the culture of the headquarters staff to enable a need to share the environment. t internal.

“From 2019 to 2020, I served on the AFCENT Intelligence Directorate staff, helping to plan and shape AFCENT intelligence collection priorities for planned operations as well as contingencies. I was selected to be a foreign area officer in 2019, but wasn’t able to enter the training pipeline until a year later. I convinced the AFCLC to let me take a Space-A French course under the logic that the French-speaking world strongly overlaps the Arabic-speaking world. I had the time and the opportunity, and the DOD had the operational need.

“Our AORs are not monolingual and the Middle East is located at the intersection of three major continents. Cultural and linguistic adaptability is an operational necessity for FAO. Therefore, flexibility in LEAP programs is both a tactical necessity and a manifestation of a bureaucracy tasked with cultivating a posture of strength capable of operating across regions. This flexibility within Air Education and Training Command that allows individual Airmen to tailor their education appropriately is also more effective in providing a force capable of responding to the President’s charge to revitalize the unparalleled network of alliances and of America’s partnerships.

“Through my LEAP training, I also had the opportunity to mentor some junior Embassy staff on the history and culture of the Arabian Gulf to better assist them in overcoming some of the cultural barriers that they were meeting.

“More strategically, during my time in Bahrain, I was able to help bolster the U.S. Embassy team by supporting the U.S. delegation to the Manama Dialogue 2021, the region’s largest annual security conference. I was assigned to the team that led the planning for Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin and his engagement in the dialogue itself and his bilateral meetings with officials from Iraq, Indonesia, Kenya and from Bahrain.

“This experience in Bahrain was my first real opportunity to engage with a foreign partner in a language other than English; Bahrain is a major non-NATO ally, which makes this bilateral relationship all the more critical. While Bahrain is culturally diverse due to the nature of the economy’s dependence on foreign workers, and much of the country speaks some degree of English, the ability of women and men Arabic-speaking American servicemen immediately establish relationships with Bahraini officials and defense forces. . Respecting, studying, and engaging with a partner country’s language, history, and culture immediately dispels any negative notions of American hubris and helps engender a sense of mutual respect in our bilateral and multilateral relationships.

“While I was just a pinch hitter on a team full of star players, it was exciting to be a fly on the wall to watch the execution of international affairs and diplomacy first hand.”

–LEAP Scholar in Modern Standard Arabic and FAO Major Timothy Bettis

Date taken: 14.01.2022
Date posted: 19.01.2022 13:50
Story ID: 413087
Site: MONTGOMERY, AL, USA

Web views: 3
Downloads: 1

PUBLIC DOMAIN

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Modern function center plan for historic Rymill House https://abcingles.net/2022/01/18/modern-function-center-plan-for-historic-rymill-house/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 01:47:39 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/01/18/modern-function-center-plan-for-historic-rymill-house/ A ‘glass box’ function pavilion for up to 140 people is proposed to be built on the grounds of one of Adelaide’s most iconic mansions. A rendering of the proposed function center at Rymill House. Image: Enzo Caroscio Architects The Rymill House Foundation Trust has filed plans with the State Planning Commission to build a […]]]>

A ‘glass box’ function pavilion for up to 140 people is proposed to be built on the grounds of one of Adelaide’s most iconic mansions.

The Rymill House Foundation Trust has filed plans with the State Planning Commission to build a single storey function center on its East Terrace property bordering the park lands.

Described in planning documents as a “simple glass box”, the free-standing glazed pavilion would be built next to the state-owned Rymill House along its Hutt Street boundary.

Planning documents submitted for public consultation indicate that the building would span just under 250 square meters and house a small kitchen, toilets and space to host events for up to 225 people standing or 140 people seated. .

The trust, which raises funds to support educational, heritage, sporting and social organizations in South Australia, has previously erected temporary marquees on the grounds to host fundraising events, conferences and occasional weddings.

According to planning documents, the proposed permanent function pavilion would “support the charitable work of the Rymill House Foundation” and “provide a source of revenue which helps to support the continued care and conservation of historic Rymill House”.

“The intention is to repurpose the venue not only as a family home, but also as a pleasant and attractive venue for public functions while enhancing the spatial experiences of the garden,” the documents state.

“This expands and formalizes the current arrangement where events have taken place on the grounds of Rymill House since 2000.”

A rendering of the proposed function center at Rymill House. Image: Enzo Caroscio Architects

Inside the proposed function center. Rendering: Enzo Caroscio Architects

The view of the proposed function center from Hutt Street. Rendering: Enzo Caroscio Architects

The Hutt Street entrance to the proposed function centre. Rendering: Enzo Caroscio Architects

Patrons of the Rymill House Foundation Trust, including former South Australian Governor Hieu Van Le and the great-granddaughter of the mansion’s original owner, have endorsed and supported the proposal, planning documents show.

Originally named ‘The Firs’, the Queen Anne style Rymill House was built for prominent Adelaide businessman Henry Rymill in 1884 and remained in the family for nearly 100 years.

It was purchased by the federal government in 1950 and housed the postmaster general’s office until 1982, when it fell into disrepair.

The current owners, the Constantine family, purchased the property in 1998 and embarked on a painstaking restoration project.

Custody is now shared between the Constantine family and the Rymill House Foundation Trust, established in 2012.

Rymill House, listed as a state heritage site. Photo: Stephanie Richards/InDaily

According to a heritage statement, Rymill House is considered one of Adelaide’s ‘historic’ buildings and ‘one of the largest and most important 19and Century Park is home to the mansions that Adelaide is famous for”.

“The relatively large scale, stylistic qualities and location of Rymill House give it a substantial presence in the locality and it is something of a landmark,” the statement read.

“It is one of three park-fronted town mansions which (the original architect John) Haslam is said to have designed in the Queen Anne English style.

“He is believed to have introduced the style to South Australia. Interestingly, the style was largely abandoned after his departure.

Planning documents say the architectural firm that designed the function centre, Enzo Caroscio, met with Adelaide City Council and Heritage SA in August and there was “general agreement that the preliminary design complied with the relevant provisions of the planning and design code”.

The documents say that since the function center is expected to be only five meters high and its design differentiates between old and new, it complies with heritage regulations.

“The composition of the design is deliberately restrained – it is designed as a simple glass box,” the documents state.

“The supporting structure is concealed to a large extent by glass curtain walls capped by a soaring roof that projects and cantilevered at the south end to form a dramatic entrance statement that frames the views from the main west gable of Rymill House.”

The Rymill House Foundation Trust has also offered to build a four-car garage and storage building, as well as installing an elevator and erecting an exterior door to the house.

InDaily contacted the Rymill House Foundation Trust for comment.

The public has until February 2 to submit comments on the plans.

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Chari de Silva leaves Caltex and begins a long career at Aitken Spence – The Island https://abcingles.net/2022/01/15/chari-de-silva-leaves-caltex-and-begins-a-long-career-at-aitken-spence-the-island/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 23:30:38 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/01/15/chari-de-silva-leaves-caltex-and-begins-a-long-career-at-aitken-spence-the-island/ CONFESSIONS OF A GLOBAL GYPSY By Dr. Chandana (Chandi) Jayawardena DPhil President – ​​Chandi J. Associates Inc. Consulting, Canada Founder and Administrator – Global Hospitality Forum chandij@sympatico.ca End of the hotel union The manager of the Coral Gardens hotel, Major Siri Samarakoon was convinced that the results of the 1977 general elections signaled the end […]]]>

CONFESSIONS OF A GLOBAL GYPSY

By Dr. Chandana (Chandi) Jayawardena DPhil

President – ​​Chandi J. Associates Inc. Consulting, Canada

Founder and Administrator – Global Hospitality Forum

chandij@sympatico.ca

End of the hotel union

The manager of the Coral Gardens hotel, Major Siri Samarakoon was convinced that the results of the 1977 general elections signaled the end of socialist trade unions in Sri Lanka. The left-wing parties that controlled these unions had lost all their seats in parliament. He was determined to reduce the number of members of the hotel union to zero by the end of July 1977. Sabinus Fernando, a member of the management team with the longest experience in managing difficult unions, given specific tasks to achieve Major’s goal. .

Sabinus successfully choreographed mass resignations of full-time employees from the union. The union’s loss of political power along with fear of Major’s “bull in a china shop” attitude, actions, and reputation, coupled with attractive inducements from Sabinus, contributed to increased union resignations. After a week, only a handful of employees were still union members. During his rounds, Major kept asking the employees he met if they had quit the union. Most employees avoided meeting Major and kept their distance from him. During this hostile period, as deputy director, I kept a low profile.

In early August 1977, while Major was checking the monthly accounts, he became angry to find that an employee was still paying union dues. He asked the secretary, “Ganeshalingam, check with the accounts department and get me the name of the only employee who is still paying dues to the fucking union!” He was informed that it was Van Dort, the cloakroom manager, with whom Major had had a confrontation on his first day at the hotel five months earlier.

Major got angrier and shouted. “Summon Van Dort, now!” When a nervous-looking Van Dort came to our office, Major asked, “How come you didn’t quit the union?” “Sir, I can’t read or write,” Van Dort confessed sheepishly in a very low voice. The major immediately dictated a letter of resignation from the union and told Van Dort, “Here, sign on that dotted line, uneducated idiot!” This was the end of the union of the Coral Gardens hotel.

End of village problems

Soon after, Major focused on the village’s problems, including the beach boys, touts, and vendors who appeared in large numbers each tourist season. Fishermen leaving their boats on the beach directly in front of the hotel, despite security guards telling them not to, was a year-long problem. Hearing about this problem, the Major said, “Chandana get ready quickly, we are going to Boossa Army Camp to meet the Commander, a good friend of mine.” Along the way, the Major explained to me that this military camp is where the headquarters of the 61st Infantry Division was established in 1971, during the uprising.

During our visit to the camp, the major said to the commander: “Colonel Wickremanayake, Chandana will be a good candidate to become a volunteer second lieutenant. He held the rank of corporal in the National Cadet Corps when he was at Ananda College. Chandana is a sportsman and was also one of four house captains for athletics when he was in 12th grade at Ananda,” Major boasted. The Colonel was impressed and said, “Of course I will recommend you to the Sri Lankan Army Volunteer Force Commander.” He then introduced me to his son, Roshan, who had also studied at the same school.

After socializing at the military camp with its senior brass, we returned to the hotel with two tough-looking sergeant majors in their military uniforms. They barely spoke during the short drive. Major and I took them to the beach and showed where the defiant fishermen kept their boats, obstructing the entrance to the hotel beach. “Sir, leave that in our hands. We will find the culprits and fix the problem immediately,” a sergeant major told Major, and saluted while standing to attention.

We returned to the office while two of them drove into town to ask for the names of the owners of these boats. An hour later, the two sergeant majors returned to our office and delivered the good news. They found and notified the responsible fisherman and the boats were immediately moved elsewhere further from the hotel. After this incident, the village’s problems were greatly reduced.

The only continuous occasional problem was a loud noise made in the hotel premises by a powerful local thug, whenever he was under the influence of alcohol. The security agents were afraid of this individual who was armed. Shortly after Major heard about this challenge, he came out of his apartment with a gun and shot one of this thug’s earlobes point-blank. Shortly after, the Major called the Hikkaduwa Police Inspector and filed a formal complaint that the thug had threatened to kill him. The Major’s action was justified in self-defense. This was the last issue the hotel faced from locals. Major started bragging to everyone he met. He described in detail how, during his first five months at the Coral Gardens Hotel, he single-handedly solved the two main challenges that the hotel’s management had faced over a ten-year period – the problems of the union and the village.

Major enjoyed hearing various rumors spread about his unusual behavior, including raising a baby leopard as a pet in his apartment. As a result, the maids who cleaned our apartments were petrified when they came to Major’s apartment. Some of these rumors weren’t true, but he didn’t mind as long as people feared him. The major gave me the impression that he had received a license for violence from the head office!

A few years later, when I watched the classic Francis Ford Coppola movie – ‘Apocalypse Now’, I couldn’t help but think of Major Siri Samarakoon. Marlon Brando’s brilliant portrayal of Colonel Kurtz, once a promising military officer transformed into something else, was simply mesmerizing and shocking at the same time.

More than a correspondent

All quickly became calm at the Coral Gardens Hotel. Low occupancy, no union, no village issues and Major being away from the hotel often all contributed to a quiet summer. One day I received a long letter from Sweden. It was from Miss Marie Blom (Blondie), a friend I met for two days in Negombo in 1974, just after graduating from Ceylon Hotel School. She was then 19 years old and a year younger than me.

After this brief romance, Blondie and I became pen pals. Shortly after her vacation in Sri Lanka, she joined the crew of a Scandinavian cruise liner. About twice a month I received a postcard from Blondie from a different port in Europe. I quickly replied to him with my news in brief on the aerograms. I was surprised to receive a long letter from her for the first time.

Blondie explained in her letter that she wanted to get to know me better. Now 22, she had decided to go to Sri Lanka again after three years. His intention was to spend three weeks with me. She wanted to take a round trip to Sri Lanka and asked me to make a nice travel itinerary. I was happy to learn that she was planning to arrive in Sri Lanka from the second week of August. I was able to take my annual leave during this period because it was a period of low occupancy. I called some of my good friends who worked as hotel executives in different cities and towns and made discount hotel reservations for Blondie and myself. My friends were eager to meet my long distance girlfriend.

Blondie returns

Blondie landed in Colombo after an overnight flight from Malmö. It was a happy meeting after three long years of waiting. On our way to Colombo, we chatted a lot trying to catch up. We talked about Blondie’s travels and my eventful first three years as an executive. We laughed at our casual encounter at the Blue Oceanic Hotel in Negombo, when I was visiting two of my friends who ran the hotel in 1974. Blondie remembered every detail of our memorable, carefree walk, barefoot on the beach, while counting the fishing boats. and the stars, on a beautiful moonlit night.

Blondie was happy with the arrangements I had made for our round trip. After traveling around Sri Lanka, we ended up in Hikkaduwa. In order not to mix my leisure with work, Blondie and I stayed in a small hostel near the Coral Gardens hotel. She also met some of my friends and made everyone laugh with her jokes.

One day, I took her for a walk at my place of work. “Who is this interesting man?” Blondie asked when she saw my pet monkey, Dudumskie. She found it simply hilarious and entertaining. After her regular sea baths, Blondie loved going to the Coral Gardens to tease Dudumskie.

Towards the end of Blondie’s holiday in Sri Lanka, we had some serious discussions about our future. She loved Sri Lanka, but when she told me she couldn’t settle on the island, I was a bit disappointed. “Why don’t you come to Sweden to live with me?” she asked. “What kind of job can I get in Sweden? I was curious to know. When Blondie told me I could start as a cook, I wasn’t interested. I was very career conscious and Blondie was a free spirit. Unlike Sri Lanka, as a well-developed nation, in Sweden few people cared about the level of position one had.

Upon her departure from Colombo airport, we had an emotional parting. We agreed to stay in touch and consider options to see each other again. Blondie was my first “serious” girlfriend. We continued our pen pal relationship for a while, but sadly we never saw each other again.

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13 Money Books Worth Reading https://abcingles.net/2022/01/14/13-money-books-worth-reading/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 17:52:22 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/01/14/13-money-books-worth-reading/ Through Richard Eisenberg, Next avenue Getty Whether 2022 is the year you decided to manage your money better or you have an adult child or grandchild you’d like to learn the basics of personal finance from, I have books for you! In fact, these are 13 money book recommendations from my “Friends Talk Money” podcast […]]]>

Through Richard Eisenberg, Next avenue

Whether 2022 is the year you decided to manage your money better or you have an adult child or grandchild you’d like to learn the basics of personal finance from, I have books for you!

In fact, these are 13 money book recommendations from my “Friends Talk Money” podcast co-hosts Pam Krueger, Terry Savage and I and are from our most recent episode (you can hear it everywhere you get podcasts). It’s an eclectic set of books – some newly published and some that are classics. But I promise all of them are helpful.

As Kruger said on the podcast, these are “books that could actually help you achieve that goal of making you financially stronger” and “can be life-changing in terms of how you approach your personal finances.” .

Incidentally, Krueger, Savage, and I are all personal finance authors and voracious readers of that ilk. So, we know a thing or two about which silver books are worth the price.

This brings me to two caveats about the personal finance books I shared on the “Friends Talk Money” podcast.

Number one: If the book contains advice on taxes or retirement planning, check the publication date. You don’t want to buy a book with outdated financial advice.

Number two: Read the author’s biography. Some personal finance books are little more than cleverly disguised sales of insurance and annuities from the authors who sell them.

Advice from Savage when selecting a book on money: ask yourself “what profound attitude adjustment can this give me about money and what new ways to think about money and to financial subjects does it exist to be worth reading?”

Moving on to the 13 books (some with the longest titles you’ve ever seen), starting with five, Krueger said she “actually tried to live” and “read and re-read.”

“The Little Book of Common Sense Investing: The Only Way to Guarantee Your Fair Share of Stock Market Returns” by John Bogle. The author is the late founder of Vanguard Mutual Funds, the father of the low-cost index fund (usually a mutual fund that buys stocks from across the stock market), and the man known as the champion of small investors. First published in 2007, Bogle’s seminal book on investing in plain English was updated in 2017. Krueger says, “It slices through the noise of Wall Street, getting to the heart of how you and I, as investors, can do the little things to thrive.

“The Millionaire Next Door” by Thomas Stanley and William Danko. First published in 1996 and re-released in 2010, it’s about ways to spend sparingly to save more – as humble small business owners often do to help them become millionaires. Krueger said the authors “can change your life by changing your habits”. (I interviewed Stanley when I was a writer at Money magazine, just before the book came out, and was impressed with his research and advice.)

“Make Money: 10 Simple Steps to Become Financially Wholeby Tiffany “The Budgetnista” Aliche. This 2021 book could be a great introduction for your adult child or your grandson. Its author is also young; Aliche is a former preschool teacher turned financial educator. Krueger suggests it to his niece who has just turned 30. “It’s a good book to get kids thinking about budgeting and living debt-free,” she said.

“The Intelligent Investor: The Definitive Book on Value Investing” by Benjamin Graham. Talk about a classic; Graham, an economist, professor and investor, first published this book on value investing (finding stocks trading at a price below their intrinsic value) in 1949. It has been updated, although sure ; most recently by Jason Zweig, “Smart Investor” columnist for the Wall Street Journal. Krueger – who has read this book at least three times – said on the podcast that when she interviewed legendary investor Warren Buffett a decade ago, he said it was the only investing book that had changed his life.

“The Wild Truth About Money: Third Edition” by Terry Savage. Krueger insisted she would recommend this 2019 book even though syndicated personal finance columnist Savage wasn’t one of our co-hosts. “What I love most about this book is that it’s about [personal finance] strategies that actually work for real people, especially for people who are about to retire,” Krueger said.

Savage’s four choices:

“The Warren Buffett Book of Investing Wisdom: 350 quotes from the world’s most successful investor” by Robert L. Bloch. Savage called Buffett “the current modern iteration of Benjamin Graham.”

“The Price You Pay for College: A Whole New Roadmap to the Biggest Financial Decision Your Family Will Ever Make” by Ron Lieber. The author is a New York Times

NYT
the personal finance writer and his excellent 2021 book focuses on financing tuition and college selection; we excerpt on Next Avenue.

“Money Magic: An Economist’s Secrets to More Money, Less Risk, and a Better Life” by Laurence J. Kotlikoff. Fresh off the press, this 2022 book by an iconoclastic Boston University professor and Social Security expert is packed with clever and sometimes provocative personal finance advice. Next Avenue recently published a Kerry Hannon interview with him on the advice of his book. One of Savage’s favorite parts: Kotlikoff’s section on “why your daughter might be better off being a plumber than a doctor.”

“Success through a positive mental attitude” by W. Clement Stone and Napoleon Hill. Savage concedes that this 1960 self-help book, which she recommends for young adults, has one flaw: it only talks about Men succeed with a positive mental attitude. But if your child or grandchild can overcome that, she says, they’ll find the advice inspiring. Savage said she started reading it in her twenties when her father had the book on his desk. (A former journalist, Savage wrote Stone’s obituary just after his 100th birthday.)

And here are my four recommendations:

“This is the year I put my financial life in order” by John Schwartz. This 2018 book is useful and fun (how many personal finance books can you tell this on?). Schwartz — now a journalism professor at the University of Texas — recounts his previous year, in his 50s, finally figuring out how to manage his money; he interviewed financial smarties to show him where he had gone wrong and what to do instead. I interviewed him for Next Avenue when the book came out.

“How to Make Your Money Last: The Essential Money Guide” by Jane Bryant Quinn. One of the top personal finance writers (Newsweek, AARP) and commentators (CBS), Quinn published this 2020 book especially for people looking for smart, practical, and straightforward retirement planning advice. I also interviewed her about the book for Next Avenue.

“Great jobs for everyone 50+: Finding a job that makes you happy and healthy…and pays the bills” by Kerry Hannon. A perfect book for this era of the big quit, it’s about full-time and part-time job opportunities and the skills you’ll need to snag them. Hannon, as you may know, is a longtime Next Avenue writer; here, she really delivers the goods.

“Right Place, Right Time: The Ultimate Guide to Choosing a Home for the Second Half of Life” by Ryan Frederick. Recently published and featured on Next Avenue, Frederick’s book can be extremely helpful if you’re thinking about where to live, downsizing, or aging in place.

Happy Reading, Happy Wealth, and Happy New Year!

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Montgomery Civil Rights Memorial Center to reopen with new exhibits https://abcingles.net/2022/01/12/montgomery-civil-rights-memorial-center-to-reopen-with-new-exhibits/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 22:02:00 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/01/12/montgomery-civil-rights-memorial-center-to-reopen-with-new-exhibits/ (WTVY) – The information below is from the Montgomery Civil Rights Memorial Center. (Press release) — MONTGOMERY, Alabama – The Civil Rights Memorial Center (CRMC) is set to reopen on Wednesday, unveiling new exhibits and updates designed to improve visitors’ understanding of the civil rights movement and the ongoing struggle for justice in the United […]]]>

(WTVY) – The information below is from the Montgomery Civil Rights Memorial Center.

(Press release) — MONTGOMERY, Alabama – The Civil Rights Memorial Center (CRMC) is set to reopen on Wednesday, unveiling new exhibits and updates designed to improve visitors’ understanding of the civil rights movement and the ongoing struggle for justice in the United States

“We are delighted to welcome visitors back to the CRMC after its temporary closure in March 2020 due to COVID-19,” said CRMC Director Tafeni English. “Before the pandemic, we started working with Monadnock Media on renovations that would improve the visitor experience and do a better job of connecting the past to the present. This work is now more important than ever in light of the current moment of racial calculation unleashed by the brutal police murder of George Floyd. “

The CRMC, managed by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), opened in 2005 as an interpretive space for the Civil Rights Memorial, located in downtown Montgomery to honor the lives of 40 people killed in course of the modern civil rights movement (1954-1968). Thousands of people visit the CRMC each year to learn about the movement and the stories of the people whose names are inscribed on the memorial.

When the CRMC reopens on January 13, visitors will discover several new features, including:

  • a community poem exhibition, compiled by New York Times bestselling author Kwame Alexander;
  • modifications to the cinema hall and a new film produced by Monadnock Media for the SPLC, Apathy is not an option;
  • An educational video presentation activated by the movement of the modern civil rights movement in the first gallery;
  • booths showcasing the history of the memorial, including its design and video of the 1989 dedication ceremony;
  • and an interactive table that allows visitors to learn more about the martyrs and the key dates of the movement.

Updates also include a high-definition mural in the hallway between the Martyrs Hall and the final gallery showcasing major social justice events of recent years. An interactive tool is also available for more information on contemporary social justice issues such as criminal justice reform, economic justice, voting rights and more.

“The reopening of the CRMC comes at just the right time as our country grapples with efforts to prevent the teaching of an honest history about race and racism in our schools,” said Margaret Huang, President and CEO of the SPLC. “The CMRC and museums across the country can help fill these gaps. I am delighted that the CRMC is reopening to once again help visitors understand the truth about the history of civil rights advocacy in this country.

The CRMC will reopen with certain restrictions to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Visitors will be required to wear masks and undergo temperature checks. Space will also be limited to groups of up to 20 people. Hours of operation are Wednesday to Friday 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. CT and Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. CT. The gift shop will remain closed until further notice.

In honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s vacation and Black History Month, admission will be free until February 2022. Visitors must register online to purchase tickets. here.

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Mayor Adams appoints Ingrid Lewis-Martin as Senior Advisor to the Mayor https://abcingles.net/2022/01/10/mayor-adams-appoints-ingrid-lewis-martin-as-senior-advisor-to-the-mayor/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 23:47:32 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/01/10/mayor-adams-appoints-ingrid-lewis-martin-as-senior-advisor-to-the-mayor/ January 10, 2022 NEW YORK—Mayor Eric Adams has announced Chaplain Ingrid Lewis-Martin as Senior Advisor to the Mayor, a role that will see her work in partnership with the Senior Deputy Mayor, the Chief of Staff, and all direct reporting to the Mayor for support operations at Town Hall and advance the administration’s strategic policies […]]]>

January 10, 2022

NEW YORK—Mayor Eric Adams has announced Chaplain Ingrid Lewis-Martin as Senior Advisor to the Mayor, a role that will see her work in partnership with the Senior Deputy Mayor, the Chief of Staff, and all direct reporting to the Mayor for support operations at Town Hall and advance the administration’s strategic policies and priorities. Chaplain Lewis-Martin recently served as Brooklyn Borough Vice President.

“We are a team that knows how to ‘get things done’, and my chief advisor has a proven track record of getting things done for New Yorkers left behind by government for far too long,” said Mayor Eric Adams. “This is a 24/7/365 administration, working tirelessly to make this city a safer and bigger place to raise healthy children and families, and lead a strong and equitable renewal that uplift all of us. “

A proud girl of Barbadian and Panamanian descent, Chaplain Lewis-Martin was born and raised in Brooklyn. Prior to assuming the post of deputy president of the Brooklyn Borough, she served for more than five years as senior advisor to then-Senator Adams and for seven years as chief of staff.

“It is an honor to serve this city and to continue to work in partnership with Mayor Adams, who has been a great champion for New Yorkers,” said Chief Advisor to the Mayor Chaplain Ingrid Lewis-Martin. “We will move things forward in a truly historic way, reaching every corner of our communities and showing thoughtful leadership that will unleash the full potential of government.” “

Chaplain Lewis-Martin’s political career began in 1983, first volunteering in the re-election campaign of the late Representative Major R. Owens and later as deputy campaign manager. After graduating from the New York City Board of Education, Chaplain Lewis-Martin was hired as an English and Social Studies teacher at IS 320 Jackie Robinson, his alma mater. She taught at the school from 1984-1992, also acting as Dean of Students, Graduation Coordinator, as well as a modern and African dance teacher in after-school programs. Chaplain Lewis-Martin was then hired by Medgar Evers College to work first as an instructor in one of its programs to help women on welfare to graduate from high school and their college diploma, then to be director of their Progressive Adolescent Vocational Exploration (PAVE), which allowed high school students to earn a maximum of 12 college credits in four years. She was also a part-time staff member of former Assembly Member Roger Green.

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The Last Days of Nazi Germany | Jean Miers https://abcingles.net/2022/01/09/the-last-days-of-nazi-germany-jean-miers/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 01:14:12 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/01/09/the-last-days-of-nazi-germany-jean-miers/ The god of this summer by Ralf Rothman, translated by Shaun Whiteside (forthcoming) WWhat is the end of WWII so morbidly fascinating? We went from the great adventure of Where eagles dare, Biggles and Monty’s tales against Rommel to a darker obsession with the last days of Nazi Germany. This unfolding armageddon – Hitler in […]]]>

The god of this summer by Ralf Rothman, translated by Shaun Whiteside (forthcoming)

WWhat is the end of WWII so morbidly fascinating? We went from the great adventure of Where eagles dare, Biggles and Monty’s tales against Rommel to a darker obsession with the last days of Nazi Germany. This unfolding armageddon – Hitler in his bunker, the advancing Russians, the columns of refugees, the bombardments, the horrible Nazis clinging to power – seems to captivate us. It’s a real life War of the Worlds.

The god of this summer, Ralf Rothmann, trad. Shaun Whiteside, Picador (£ 13.99)

In recent years, the addition of authentic German voices has given momentum to this macabre drama. Some of them have really experienced the crisis, others have easy access to those who have experienced it. For decades, hearing the German point of view in the English-speaking world was rare. Naturally, the Germans were reluctant to portray the events of the war in a manner sympathetic to their side. A woman in Berlin, a German journalist’s account of the Red Army sacking Berlin in 1945, was originally avoided from publication in his native country in the 1950s; it has only been critically acclaimed in Germany this century.

Since then, fortunately, the balance has been restored in the media, with television series such as the reboot of Das Botte (2018) to translations of the writings of Walter Kempowski and others into fiction and non-fiction. These take a more nuanced approach than the patriotic black and white stories we are used to in which the Axis powers and people are all “bad guys” and the Allies force the good guys. The change appeals to modern tastes for a more measured and ambiguous portrayal of the events that affected ordinary Germans as they faced moral dilemmas under the Nazi regime. This is all the more effective from the German point of view, exposed as it was to the appalling savagery of the last moments of the war.

The god of this summer by Ralf Rothman, originally written in German in 2018 and recently translated into English, is the latest in a growing body of literature that deals with the horrors of WWII from a German perspective.

How do different people react when the impending disaster unfolds?

Rothman certainly makes no effort when it comes to his depiction of the day-to-day life of twelve-year-old Luisa towards the end of the war. In this case, it is not the Russians who approach without remorse, but the British (or English, as they are called here). From flattened and smoldering Kiel and the nearby concentration camp to detailed descriptions of sick horses, the image he paints is compelling, repulsive, and colorful throughout.

How do different people react when the impending disaster unfolds? A certain despair, like Luisa’s father, who takes a drink knowing what will happen, gradually sinking into depression as the family situation deteriorates. Others are in denial. Luisa’s half-sister, married to a top Nazi official, lives in the fantasy of the “miracle weapon” that saves them all from defeat. She must believe that Germany will win the war, because the alternative is too dark for her to consider. Luisa’s other sister takes a hedonistic approach, regarding men, parties and drugs.

The strangest thing is the reaction of the bad guys. As in real life, instead of trying to redeem themselves, the book’s Nazi makers double down as the end draws near, their behavior becoming more and more monstrous. These characters and their attitudes fuel the feeling of impending doom, magnifying the realism and the reader’s immersion in the story.

The German imagination links the two disasters of the Thirty Years’ War and the Second World War

Ralf Rothman is in his late sixties a novelist, poet and playwright from Schleswig (where the book is set). His first dozen works are set in contemporary urban Germany, garnering numerous German literary awards along the way. The god of this summer, translated into English by Shaun Whiteside, is the second of his books to deal with the trauma of WWII. A loose sequel to the award-winning Die in the spring, it’s a captivating and visceral depiction of German life through the eyes of a young adolescent, showing the breakdown of order and human character under the pressure of impending catastrophe.

My only question mark hovers above the subplot: a short story all by itself wedged between the pages of the most effective main narrative. It echoes the main plot and takes place three hundred years earlier in that other German apocalypse, the Thirty Years’ War. It starts to creak a bit after the first few pages, raising the question: why didn’t Rothman focus on the main storyline and plot progression? In the German imagination, the two disasters of the Thirty Years’ War and WWII are much more closely linked – it is quite possible that this link is somewhat lost in the translation.

Aside from the subplot, this is a compelling addition to a growing canon of depictions of a moment in history that is right in living memory.


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Researcher / PostDoc (m / f / x) job with TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITAT DRESDEN (TU DRESDEN) https://abcingles.net/2022/01/07/researcher-postdoc-m-f-x-job-with-technische-universitat-dresden-tu-dresden/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 12:13:55 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/01/07/researcher-postdoc-m-f-x-job-with-technische-universitat-dresden-tu-dresden/ AT TU Dresden, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Department of Geosciences, the Chair of Geoinformatics offers a project position within the Projekt „NFDI4Earth – National Research Data Infrastructure for Earth System Sciences“ Research associate / PostDoc (m / f / x) Software architect for innovative research data infrastructures (subject to personal qualification, employees are paid according […]]]>

AT TU Dresden, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Department of Geosciences, the Chair of Geoinformatics offers a project position within the Projekt „NFDI4Earth – National Research Data Infrastructure for Earth System Sciences

Research associate / PostDoc (m / f / x)

Software architect for innovative research data infrastructures

(subject to personal qualification, employees are paid according to the salary group E 13 TV-L)

departure as soon as possible and limited until September 30, 2026. The employment period is governed by § 2 (2) of the Act on Fixed-Term Research Contracts (Wissenschaftszeitvertragsgesetz – WissZeitVG).

The DFG-funded NFDI4Earth project is part of the German National Research Data Infrastructure (NFDI) and addresses digital needs in Earth System Sciences. It provides researchers with FAIR, consistent and open access to all relevant data as well as innovative methods for research data management and collaborative data analysis. The project consortium is coordinated by TU Dresden and includes 58 partners from well-known national institutions in the field of Earth System Sciences. The advertised position is in the NFDI4Earth coordination office of the Chair of Geoinformatics, with close links to the TU Dresden Center for Information Services and High Performance Computing (ZIH) and the Support Center Research Data at TU Dresden.

Tasks

  • scientific work on the needs analysis and design of the central web support services for NFDI4Earth, including the central knowledge base for the project (Knowledge Hub)
  • analysis of technical requirements and architectural project for central support services (such as NFDI4Earth OneStop4All, EduHub, etc.)
  • evaluation and implementation of appropriate software components in this regard and their transfer to operational use in NFDI4Earth
  • co-development of cooperation strategies for existing open source software frameworks and platforms
  • co-development of cooperation strategies, in particular for existing HPC and IT support structures with the aim of a sustainable functioning of NFDI4Earth services
  • Contribution to white papers, best practices, standards and documentation on the above concepts and implementations
  • documentation and communication of results within NFID4Earth and other relevant national research data infrastructures, as well as significant involvement in monitoring and reporting specifically on IT developments within the NFID4Earth consortium
  • participation in national and international networks on relevant NFDI4Earth topics, for example in the Research Data Alliance or the Open Geospatial Consortium
  • publication and presentation of project results in national and international journals and events

Requirements

  • university degree (minimum Masters level) in the field of geoinformatics, computer science, or in a comparable engineering or natural sciences
  • preferably a relevant doctorate
  • very good knowledge / experience in data management, software development and distributed infrastructure
  • in-depth knowledge of existing software, repositories and infrastructures in the field of earth systems sciences
  • very good knowledge of technical and community standards for metadata, data and research data management and earth system science services
  • enjoys communicating and interacting with other scientists
  • a high degree of independence, commitment, flexibility and team spirit
  • very good knowledge of English

What we offer

Working at the Chair of Geoinformatics offers you an innovative, creative and solution-oriented work environment within a team of experts on the topics of the future of information infrastructures – in particular in the context of systems sciences. terrestrial and environmental applications. We offer a modern workplace as well as access to modern IT infrastructure and innovative services at TU Dresden University of International Excellence, with flexible working hours and a working and family living environment in Dresden , one of the most liveable cities in Germany. . Mobile work is made possible.

For more information and in case of questions, please contact Jörg Seegert (joerg.seegert@tu-dresden.de).

Applications from women are particularly welcome. The same goes for people with disabilities.

Please submit your complete application (including cover letter, curriculum vitae, list of publications, digital copies of certificates and diplomas) by February 1, 2022 (the stamped arrival date of the university’s central mail service applies), preferably via the SecureMail portal of TU Dresden https://securemail.tu-dresden.de as a single PDF document for lars.bernard@tu-dresden.de or by post to: TU Dresden, Fakultät Umweltwissenschaften, Fachrichtung Geowissenschaften, Professur für Geoinformatik, Herrn Prof. Lars Bernard, Helmholtzstr. 10, 01069 Dresden. Please only submit copies, as your application will not be returned to you. Expenses incurred to attend interviews cannot be reimbursed.

Data protection reference: Your data protection rights, the purpose for which your data will be processed, as well as further information on data protection can be found on the website: https://tu-dresden.de/karriere/datenschutzhinweis


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Universities must help their communities preserve heritage languages https://abcingles.net/2022/01/05/universities-must-help-their-communities-preserve-heritage-languages/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 09:31:23 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/01/05/universities-must-help-their-communities-preserve-heritage-languages/ Compared to other Asian migrant populations in Western Australia (WA), the Mongolian community is relatively small, with less than 400 people. However, the second generation children of this group are already in real danger of losing all traces of their Mongolian language, culture and heritage. The situation contrasts sharply with what has happened with larger […]]]>

Compared to other Asian migrant populations in Western Australia (WA), the Mongolian community is relatively small, with less than 400 people. However, the second generation children of this group are already in real danger of losing all traces of their Mongolian language, culture and heritage.

The situation contrasts sharply with what has happened with larger migrant groups, such as the Chinese community, which has over 100,000 inhabitants in WA. They have succeeded in preserving their language and their culture by force of numbers. Unfortunately, small migrant communities are much more susceptible to linguistic assimilation – losing their original language as one gradually changes to the dominant language of the host society.

However, size is not everything and being a small migrant community is not necessarily the key factor in the loss of language and culture. Despite their large populations here, Italian and Greek migrants are losing their language faster than any other group of migrants in Australia. This may have happened because most post-war Italian migrants to Australia spoke only specific dialects as their first language, and in the context of the White Australia Politics and the imperative to assimilate, they did not pass on their dialects to the second generation. This resulted in the sad plight of grandchildren unable to speak to their grandparents.

An equally tragic situation looms for the second generation of Mongolian children in WA. Many Mongolians who settle here have an Australian spouse, whom they may have met in Mongolia while these partners worked for mining companies such as Rio Tinto. But now that these families live in Australia, the Mongolian language is often not used in these households.

Even when both parents are Mongolians, many encourage their children to speak “only English” both at school and at home – their goal, naturally, like that of Italians and Greeks, is to assimilate their children into their new community.

Many parents have misconceptions about being bilingual and, like many in Australia, have a unilingual mindset. Thus, they believe that by using English as much as possible, their children have the best chance of prospering in mainstream society. As a result, the importance of passing on one’s native language to the next generation is often overlooked, even though we know that language and culture are essential to well-being and a positive self-identity.

What is the role of universities in the preservation of languages?

Given these grim realities, it is vital for linguists based at universities in multicultural places such as Australia to focus on factual research on the maintenance of original languages. Although a lot of research has been done in this area, there is still a long way to go. Another crucial role of universities is to educate the public and society about heritage language rights as defined by the UN.

Heritage languages ​​should be a valued part of modern Australian culture and society given their importance for a sense of belonging and identity. When a language dies, the link with the cultural, traditional and historical past of that particular heritage also disappears.

Universities also have a responsibility to provide administrators and decision-makers at local and national government levels with policy recommendations based on their evidence-based research on the revitalization of original languages. As academics, we must defend and promote the importance of preserving heritage languages ​​while working collaboratively with community language schools to establish a standard bilingual curriculum. Helpfully, such collaboration can enable strong recommendations based on both theory and practice to help inform policy development.

It is equally crucial for universities to help raise awareness among community migrant groups and within them of the importance of maintaining and passing on their languages ​​to future generations. As society becomes more and more multicultural, there is a need for citizens with an immigrant background to learn to function linguistically in a variety of contexts. Acquisition of English should not interfere with proficiency in heritage languages ​​and vice versa – the main aim should be to develop complementary and balanced excellence in both languages.

The most appropriate bilingual educational approach is one which maintains the right balance between linguistic assimilation into English but without the linguistic loss of heritage languages. Both languages ​​should adapt to mutually inclusive approaches.

How can universities help preserve languages?

Universities can support the preservation and revitalization of heritage languages ​​by helping community language schools provide quality education. As experts, academics have the capacity to help them apply the most innovative research and educational approaches. By sharing their research and theoretical understanding, universities are able to translate their knowledge into society at large.

Universities can also communicate directly with parents to share the importance of transmitting their native language and culture, help them learn how to become more actively involved in their child’s academic success and foster an appreciation of their linguistic context. and unique culture.

Universities also have the opportunity to advocate for policies that promote linguistic diversity as standard societal practice and recognize heritage languages ​​as educational and cultural resources. Practical examples could be a recommendation for a study program that would push all students beyond basic foreign language skills. Not all students would necessarily be fluent in said foreign languages, but the process of in-depth study of a foreign language and culture would likely result in a better appreciation of cultural and linguistic diversity.

Additionally, universities can intensify discussions on campus through bottom-up practices such as creating safe public spaces for students with an immigrant background to make full use of their language skills. Encouraging open community groups engaging in cultural and linguistic exchanges on campus is also important – this could include elements of the linguistic landscape such as signs, instructions and other written materials featuring foreign languages. Even small steps like these can help a largely monolingual mindset become more exposed and open to the idea of ​​a multilingual society.

Sender Dovchin is Principal Investigator and Discipline Officer in the Applied Linguistics and Languages ​​group at the School of Education at Curtin University, Australia. Dr Dovchin is also an early career researcher with the Australian Research Council, specializing in language and discrimination issues.

Rhonda Oliver is an expert in second language and second dialect acquisition, particularly for child and adolescent learners, at the School of Education at Curtin University. She is an active researcher and has made a significant contribution to curriculum change and innovation in WA schools.


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