Modern English – ABC Ingles http://abcingles.net/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 07:03:17 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://abcingles.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-4-150x150.png Modern English – ABC Ingles http://abcingles.net/ 32 32 Wall Street watches 2023, sighs deeply https://abcingles.net/2022/11/24/wall-street-watches-2023-sighs-deeply/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 06:31:20 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/11/24/wall-street-watches-2023-sighs-deeply/ This article is an on-site version of our Unhedged newsletter. Register here to receive the newsletter directly in your inbox every day of the week Happy Thanksgiving, Americans! Rob and Ethan observe their patriotic duty to consume their own weight in food, so Katie Martin writes from London. On the sales side, it’s starting to […]]]>

This article is an on-site version of our Unhedged newsletter. Register here to receive the newsletter directly in your inbox every day of the week

Happy Thanksgiving, Americans! Rob and Ethan observe their patriotic duty to consume their own weight in food, so Katie Martin writes from London.

On the sales side, it’s starting to look a lot like the outlook season for the year ahead. I read a bunch of reports so you don’t have to. Summary: Everyone likes sad and beaten bonds, but not sad and beaten stocks. That’s odd, given that a recession looks like a certainty for next year. The Bank of America Investor Survey shows that 77% expect to have one within the next 12 months. So you would think it would already be baked into the stocks. Is the street too pessimistic? Let me know what you think: katie.martin@ft.com

Unhedged will be disabled tomorrow, back on Monday. While we’re away why not read the excellent FT crypto finance newsletter? You can register by clicking here.

The most wonderful time of the year

The race to dispatch the first prospects of the season was won by Morgan Stanley this year, when they lifted the trophy on November 13. Congratulations to everyone involved. Honorable mention to Goldman Sachs, whose article on the US inflation outlook came out the same day.

As of this writing, Goldman wears the yellow jersey for total forecast volume: over 500 pages of hoo-ha for the coming year so far. First prize for the longest single report to date: UBS Wealth Management, 72 pages including all tree photos. Trees next to water. Trees beside the roads. Trees covered in snow. Trees. Any message?

Best of all, the timing of all these reports leaves a good chunk of 2022 to play for. Nothing warms the heart on a winter’s day like a bank sharing its outlook for the year ahead and its business ideas before the start of the new year.

On one level, of course, this is all a huge waste of time. Did you have “the Russian invasion of Ukraine” or the “massive UK defined benefit pension plan deleveraging event” on your “things to watch” list for 2022? No you didn’t. So why am I reading them? Partly because I need to get out more. And partly because I want the answer to a tricky question: Everyone knows a recession is coming. So, are the stocks ready? Will 2022 be less of a shipwreck?

Here is:

Morgan Stanley. November 13; 63 pages; no pictures of trees but at least two of strategist Andrew Sheets’ trademark cartoons.

2022: How much? This bad:

Phew.

The only people having fun in the markets this year are managing macro-hedge funds with positions of the short/long dollar rate type.

The good news for everyone is that Morgan Stanley estimates that the S&P 500 will end next year pretty much where it is right now. The bad news:

It will not be a smooth journey. Consensus earnings are just too high for 2023. We expect 2023 to be a rocky start with a solid end.

We remain well below the upward consensus 2023 EPS forecast for the S&P 500. We believe it is only a matter of time before earnings estimates fall in a more accelerated fashion, reflecting the type of decline expressed in our forecast. The question is one of timing.

Ultimately, our most recent bullish tactical call for the S&P 500 to reach 4,000-4,150 will eventually unwind, with the index likely driving this bear market down in 1Q23 as 2023 earnings revisions become more severe. .

UBS Heritage. November 17; 72 pages including trees.

As for monetary tightening, yes, we may be almost there, UBS believes, with rate hikes likely to end in the first or second quarter. Indeed, “we believe inflation should be close enough to target by year-end for the Fed to consider rate cuts.”

The baseline scenario is: “Markets remain volatile and under pressure from inflation and rate fears, and amid lower growth expectations. The risk-reward balance remains unfavourable, with actions ending in June 2023 around current levels.”

In other words: boring.

Objectives of the UBS scenario

But investors probably just have to get through this frustrating time.

We expect the backdrop for risky assets to become more positive over the course of the year. This means that investors who have the patience and discipline to stay invested should be rewarded with time. Investors currently sheltered from volatility will need to plan when and how to return to riskier assets during 2023.

Historically, markets begin to turn between three and nine months before a bottom in economic activity and corporate earnings. With this in mind, a more constructive environment for risky assets should begin to emerge over the course of the year.

Goldman Sachs. outlook for the November 21 equity strategy; 30 pages. No pictures. The excerpts here are from a range of his reports.

Goldman is still part of the “Softish US Landing” team. The problem with that is:

This central trajectory now seems to be well reflected in asset markets, especially after the evolution of prices during the first half of November. But it also means that the risks on both sides of this central trajectory are now less well assessed: plausible outcomes in which there is more inflation persistence, a slide into an outright US recession, or – the line staple for many macro investors – both.

Thus, even after a long year of worry, the market remains vulnerable to bad news on growth and inflation.

In terms of asset performance, no, not there yet at all. And Pomo is the new FOMO.

The bear market is not over, in our view.

The conditions generally consistent with an equity bottom have not yet been reached. We expect lower valuations (in line with the results of the recession), a trough in the deteriorating growth momentum and a peak in interest rates before the onset of a sustained recovery.

We expect markets to move into a “Hope” phase of the next bull market sometime in 2023, but from a lower level. The initial bounce from the bottom should be strong, like at the start of most cycles before moving into a “post-modern cycle” with lower returns.

We expect overall returns by the end of next year to be relatively weak.

A weak economy that is still deteriorating is very different from an economy that is doing less badly. Generally, history suggests that the worst time to buy stocks is when growth is contracting and momentum is deteriorating, and the best time is when growth is weak but trending towards stabilization. Although we are likely to move into the phase of improving growth momentum at some point in 2023, the closer term looks less promising.

Our economists don’t expect any rate cuts until 2024.

Expect to be irritated.

Swiss credit. November 22, 67 (small) pages, full of train photos.

Like the others, CS expects a good run for bonds and a continued mess in equities, especially in the first half.

The environment remains challenging for equity markets as we expect the nominal economic growth rate to slow significantly, reducing the potential for earnings growth. In addition, profit margins near company records will likely come under pressure and begin to reflect various cost pressures.

Consensus earnings have already been revised down, but the current estimate of 3.7% growth for 2023 may still be too optimistic, in our view.

We expect a turning point in the market to materialize in the second half of 2023. Until then, we expect volatile but rather subdued equity returns and will focus primarily on defensive sectors/regions offering stable margins, resilient earnings and low leverage.

So, once again, prepare for a very boring year.

Dear market analysts, we appreciate you, but this is a frankly depressing message.

A good read

Bloomberg asks the important question: Can Nigel Farage make you rich? (Spoiler: No.)

Crypto finance – Scott Chipolina filters the noise from the global cryptocurrency industry. Register here

Swamp Notes – Expert insight into the intersection of money and power in American politics. Register here

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Lifetime award for acclaimed British playwright Caryl Churchill overturned in libel for ‘anti-Semitism’ https://abcingles.net/2022/11/21/lifetime-award-for-acclaimed-british-playwright-caryl-churchill-overturned-in-libel-for-anti-semitism/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 18:33:07 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/11/21/lifetime-award-for-acclaimed-british-playwright-caryl-churchill-overturned-in-libel-for-anti-semitism/ Cancellation of a lifetime award for eminent British playwright Caryl Churchill because of his support for Palestinian rights is a shameful slander and act of censorship. The move is the result of more than a decade of political bashing of Churchill as part of a broader right-wing campaign to recast anti-Zionism and any criticism of […]]]>

Cancellation of a lifetime award for eminent British playwright Caryl Churchill because of his support for Palestinian rights is a shameful slander and act of censorship. The move is the result of more than a decade of political bashing of Churchill as part of a broader right-wing campaign to recast anti-Zionism and any criticism of the state of Israel as anti-Semitic.

Churchill, 84, is a leading figure in British theatre, with plays like serious money (about the Thatcherite financial capital boom) and A light shining in Buckinghamshire (based on Putney’s debates during the English Civil War). A longtime critic of Israel’s repression of Palestinians, she is a strong supporter of the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement for Palestinian rights.

Caryl Churchill [Photo by Johan Persson / CC BY-NC-SA 4.0]

More than 170 actors, lawyers, writers and producers have signed a powerful open letter as artists for Palestine, defending it against “modern McCarthyism” and highlighting the attack on its legal rights. Signatories include Breyten Breytenbach, Stephen Daldry, Brian Eno, Stephen Frears, Mike Leigh, Ken Loach, Miriam Margolyes, Maxine Peake, Miranda Richardson, Kae Tempest and Harriet Walter.

Human rights lawyer Sir Geoffrey Bindman KC said Churchill’s award withdrawal “on the grounds of his support for BDS clearly violates his right to freedom of expression protected by Article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights”.

The courage of the signatories in the face of a vicious campaign that will inevitably backfire is significant.

The European Drama Prize, worth €75,000, is presented by Schauspiel Stuttgart and sponsored by the German Ministry of Science, Research and Arts Baden-Württemberg. This month the jury reversed their decision in April and overturned Churchill’s lifetime achievement award, saying he had been ‘made aware of previously unknown information’.

Schauspiel’s attack was an explicitly political attack. He wrote “in the meantime, we have become aware of the author’s signatures in favor of boycott, divestment and sanctions”.

Churchill was proud of her “support for BDS and the Palestinians.” A depiction of her in 2001 Far raised funds for Palestinian theaters. She is patron of the Palestine Solidarity Campaign, which adopted the BDS policy that year. Claims that this was “previously unknown information” is a transparent lie.

The open letter in defense of Churchill notes that the goals of the BDS movement – ​​“an end to occupation, full equality for Palestinian citizens of Israel and the right of return for Palestinian refugees – are consistent with international law.” Zionists, outraged by any criticism of the State of Israel, regularly call BDS anti-Semitic.

Mike Leigh wrote: “I support Caryl Churchill in his fully justified support for the struggle of the Palestinian people against the Israeli apartheid regime. For the Schauspiel Stuttgart, canceling its prestigious award is irresponsible, illiberal and ignorant; the decision reeks of the very fascism it affects to oppose.

Director Dominic Cooke said that “drawing attention to Israel’s human rights abuses and illegal occupation of Palestinian territory is not anti-Semitic, it is legitimate protest. We must defend the right of artists to comment on it, as well as any other abuse of power in the world, without them being subjected to defamatory insults and despicable insults.

Schauspiel repeated the attacks on Churchill in 2009 Seven Jewish children, a 10-minute play, directed by Cooke, in response to 2008’s Operation Cast Lead. This bombardment of Gaza killed at least 1,383 Palestinians, mostly civilians, including 333 children, according to Amnesty International figures. Only 13 Israelis were killed, including three civilians, in this one-sided massacre. A United Nations investigation concluded that the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) had committed war crimes and possible crimes against humanity.

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Spirited and the History of Adaptations of a Christmas Carol https://abcingles.net/2022/11/18/spirited-and-the-history-of-adaptations-of-a-christmas-carol/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 22:10:00 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/11/18/spirited-and-the-history-of-adaptations-of-a-christmas-carol/ VSLint Briggs (Ryan Reynolds) is a media consultant who sells the public the image his client wants, regardless of the pesky truth. He’s also haunted by a series of ghosts – and he doesn’t. Mid-haunting, he breaks the flutter body by Jacob Marley (Patrick Page). “I’m so sorry,” Briggs interjects. “I’m stuck on the first […]]]>

VSLint Briggs (Ryan Reynolds) is a media consultant who sells the public the image his client wants, regardless of the pesky truth. He’s also haunted by a series of ghosts – and he doesn’t. Mid-haunting, he breaks the flutter body by Jacob Marley (Patrick Page).

“I’m so sorry,” Briggs interjects. “I’m stuck on the first thing there – you said past, present, future – like A Christmas Carol, the story of Dickens? Bill Murray’s movie starring Bobcat Goldthwait?

“Yeah, yeah, like the Dickens book and the Bill Murray movie,” Marley replies in frustration. “And all the other adaptations no one asked for!”

This self-referential bit comes from Fiery– a musical starring Reynolds, Page, Will Ferrell, Octavia Spencer and Sunita Mani – which will be streaming on Apple TV+ on November 18. This is the umpteenth retelling of the 1843 short story by Charles Dickens. A Christmas Carol, a timeless story that has evolved over the centuries. This time, however, the classic story is told from the perspective of ghosts, who select one corrupt soul to reform each year.

Read more: The real reason Charles Dickens wrote a Christmas carol

And the new musical is in good company: The Internet Movie Database lists more than 100 releases of A Christmas Carol, including a video game. Episodes of over 20 TV shows have been inspired by the short story, and there are four opera and two ballet versions of the story. No less than three adaptations are due this season alone; in addition to FieryNetflix has an animated version voiced by Olivia Colman and Luke Evans for December 2, and a version will hit Broadway starting November 21 with over 50 roles played by actor Jefferson Mays.

A Christmas Carol spawned countless iterations, perhaps because of its penchant for redemption and faith in humanity. While the original is firmly rooted in the mid-19th century, its themes translate all too well to modern times.

How Fiery chains A Christmas Carol

“It’s no surprise that A Christmas Carol continues to conquer the hearts of cultures founded and disrupted by socio-economic inequalities,” Tim CarensDirector of British Studies at the College of Charleston, Told Folio English Department Blog in 2018.

“It’s a melodramatic morality tale made for communities that can neither justify nor condemn the process by which a small minority extracts immense wealth from the work of the many,” Carens continued. “Melodramas achieve catharsis by polarizing good and evil.”

In Fiery, that small minority is represented by the Briggs Media Group, which specializes in harnessing human laziness and desperation to sell products, images, contestants, and more. The many, in an early scene, are represented by the National Association of Christmas Tree Growers, fighting the rise of artificial Christmas trees and same-day shipping.

Briggs takes the stage at a Christmas tree convention to trick members of the business group into buying his exorbitant services and manipulating their clients. “Every Boomer who loves Facebook wants to wage a culture war,” sings Briggs. “So tell your primary consumer what they’re fighting for: a fight for morality.”

In Briggs, the ghost of the Christmas present (Will Ferrell) finds his perfect Scrooge, a symbol of contemporary apathy, narcissism, individualism and capitalism. The media consultant is an “unsalvageable”, collectively considered by the other ghosts to be too far to save, but the Christmas present Ghost is determined.

Which makes A Christmas Carol work

The themes and framework of A Christmas Carol fit right into the 21st century, as they have since publication. Originally published on December 19, 1843, the first edition exhausted by Christmas Eve. Since then, it has never been exhausted, largely because its examination of the haves versus the have-nots has never gone out of place.

Laurie Langbauerprofessor of English and comparative literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, teaches the short story to his students.

“It’s persistent because it’s just such a great story by a great writer,” Langbauer Told Well. “Dickens was trying to capture the essential questions about human brotherhood that still preoccupy us today.”

As the appetite for stories about humanity persists, so will ghost story audiences. The Victorians associated Christmas, one of the longest nights of the year, with darkness and ghosts, which lent itself to magic and fairy tales.

Read more: How Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol Changed the Way the Holidays Are Celebrated

“He captured this almost crystalline structure of the fairy tale that makes him easy to grasp,” Langbauer said of Dickens. “But infinitely malleable and important for what it captures about psychology as well as culture.”

For Langbauer, the I do not know what of A Christmas Carol lies in the fact that, in the world that Dickens constructs, redemption remains possible for everyone. If even the stingiest and most miserable of characters has the potential to change, so does the reader.

“We know things are going to work out right from the start with a great, really avuncular narrator, kind of an expansive narrator who cracks jokes and has a worldview that tells us this is a world in which people don’t sometimes aren’t nice, but kindness is always the most important thing,” Langbauer said. “People want to keep believing they live in that kind of world, especially during the dark days of every year.”

Other notable versions of A Christmas Carol

For 179 years now, A Christmas Carol captivated the public: when it was published, it was widely plagiarized in print, which embroiled Dickens in a drawn-out legal battle. Almost immediately too, the story was adapted into unauthorized stage productions.

The simple structure of the story made it possible to adapt it endlessly, including on stage. Ray Dooley, professor emeritus of drama at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has starred in theatrical versions of the story several times. (Dickens himself staged more than 150 performances of text.)

“You can paint the house any color you want, but the house will still be there,” Dooley said. “You can do almost anything with it, and the foundation will support you and provide delicious alternatives.”

Centuries later, many may not have read the original text itself, but they may well have seen the 1988 film. Scrooged with Bill Murray, or The Puppet Christmas Carol from 1992, or Alone at homein which a character of Scrooge (Old Man Marley) changes his mind inspired by a young boy in danger (Kevin) – much like Tiny Tim.

How the Grinch Stole Christmas is only a “seussified” version of the tale featuring an embittered and exploitative old man who suffers an epiphany”, said Carens. “Learning the ‘true spirit’ of Christmas and embracing its philosophy of giving rather than taking.”

More must-reads from TIME


contact us at letters@time.com.

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Whip It Good on the Jersey Shore with Carl Gentry https://abcingles.net/2022/11/16/whip-it-good-on-the-jersey-shore-with-carl-gentry/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 10:35:17 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/11/16/whip-it-good-on-the-jersey-shore-with-carl-gentry/ 3 minute read 80s music icon Ranking Roger Charlery dead at 56, mourned by other artists Roger Charlery, aka Ranking Roger, lead singer of ska band The English Beat and co-founder of General Public, has died aged 56. USA today Get him in shape this weekend at Asbury Park. You can at “Whip It Good!” […]]]>


3 minute read

to play

Get him in shape this weekend at Asbury Park.

You can at “Whip It Good!” 80s new wave rock revue with Carl Gentry and Friends on Saturday November 19th at Tim McLoone’s Supper Club on the Asbury Park promenade.

Think of it as an early ’80s mixtape performed live by some of the best musicians around.

“It’s the sound of the new wave,” Gentry said. “The keyboards and the themes that they had, there was this little new wave twitch. They’re rock songs, which is cool, but before everything really became big in the 80s, including the hair.

It was the music that accompanied the birth of MTV – which aired music videos instead of continuous episodes of “Wild ‘N Out”.

“It’s basically me coming home from school or college or 9th grade, coming home and turning the TV on downstairs and it would be one after another of each of these groups,” said Gentry. “It’s a real passion project for all of us in the group. We are all at the same time in our fifties. This music was so great.

Expect to hear music from bands like the Cars, Squeeze, A Flock of Seagulls, Joe Jackson, Madness, Adam Ant, Gary Numan, the Clash, the Romantics, Modern English, Devo and more. New wave refers to bands, many of them British, that emerged in the late 70s and early 80s and were inspired by punk rock.

The Gentry group includes Arne Wendt, who performed with Jon Bon Jovi’s Kings of Suburbia; Muddy Shews (Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes); and Chris O’Hara (Drama Drama). Alas, no Bon Jovi songs — not enough new waves, Gentry said.

Go: “Whip it good!” with Carl Gentry and Friends, 8 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 19, Tim McLoone’s Supper Club, Asbury Park Boardwalk, $39.95; timmcloonessupperclub.com.

David Sancious in Red Bank

If you’ve ever wondered why the E Street Band is called the E Street Band, it’s because former band member David Sancious lived on E Street in Belmar.

Sancious returns to the Jersey Shore with a show Friday, January 6, 2023 at the Vogel Theater inside the Count Basie Center for the Arts in Red Bank. The evening, entitled “An Evening with David Sancious”, is presented by the Bruce Springsteen Archives and Center for American Music at Monmouth University and the Basie Center.

Will Calhoun, drummer for Living Color and multi-Grammy, will join Sancious on stage.

“I’m really happy to be returning to the Jersey Shore,” Sancious said in a statement. “Performing under the banner of the Bruce Springsteen Archives and Center for American Music makes the show even more rewarding for me.”

After:Atlantic City rumble gears up between adjacent new music festival, Bamboozle

After:Beatles, Bon Jovi, Max Weinberg and more take part in virtual NJ Hall of Fame ceremony

Sancious has played with his own band, Tone, as well as Peter Gabriel, Sting, Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, Seal and many more.

“We are proud to present David Sancious in concert, marking the Springsteen Archives and Center for American Music’s first public program in 2023,” Archives Director Eileen Chapman said in a statement. “David’s contributions to the E Street Band in the early 70s are well known, and his recordings as a solo artist are highly regarded.”

Tickets start at $49. Visit thebasie.org for more information.

Subscribe to app.com for the latest news on the New Jersey music scene.

Jersey Shore native Chris Jordan covers entertainment and reporting for USA Today Network New Jersey. Contact him at @chrisfhjordan; cjordan@app.com.

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11 Great Full English Breakfasts in London — London x London https://abcingles.net/2022/11/13/11-great-full-english-breakfasts-in-london-london-x-london/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/11/13/11-great-full-english-breakfasts-in-london-london-x-london/ Love it? Save and share! Looking for the best full English breakfast in London? Look no further than these fry spots. Is there anything better than good frying? No, I didn’t think so. But where’s the best crispy bacon, succulent sausages, and all the fried eggs with sourdough toast for dipping the yolks? We’ve picked […]]]>

Love it? Save and share!

Looking for the best full English breakfast in London? Look no further than these fry spots.

Is there anything better than good frying? No, I didn’t think so. But where’s the best crispy bacon, succulent sausages, and all the fried eggs with sourdough toast for dipping the yolks?

We’ve picked out some of London’s best fried food restaurants, from old-school British cafes to chic full English breakfasts with a view.

These are the best places to get your morning breakfast fix.

Where to find the best English breakfast in London

Regency Coffee

Regency Coffee is a bit of a London institution and it would have been a huge disservice not to mention it when talking about the best English breakfast in London.

Serving hearty plates of the good stuff since 1946, the Regency Cafe’s old-fashioned breakfast is a must if you haven’t had the treat yet.

This no-frills cafe has been the backdrop for movies like Rocketman and Layer Cake, likely because its signature gingham curtains and art deco exterior make it a cool movie set.

Of course, the Regency Cafe’s full English breakfast serves up all the trimmings like black pudding and a big helping of baked beans.

Duck & Waffle

For busy Londoners who need a place to relax any time of the day, head to Duck & Waffle.

London’s tallest 24-hour restaurant is open all day Monday to Friday and happens to serve one of the best English breakfasts in London.

Sausages, dry cured bacon, field mushrooms, crunchy hash browns, roasted tomatoes and eggs cooked to your liking.

A trip to Duck & Waffle isn’t just about the incredible breakfast, this chic restaurant is 40 stories up from the Heron Tower.

We can’t think of a better place to have breakfast and watch the sunrise over the London skyline.

The Wolsley

The Wolsley is a glamorous place to enjoy full English. Its art deco interior complements its excellent full English breakfast which is certainly a little fancier than your average fried food.

The English comes with poached, fried or scrambled eggs, and the usual suspects, baked beans, mushrooms, bacon, sausages and indulgent black pudding.

To wash it all down, the Wolseley offers all sorts of breakfast drinks, like freshly made juices, teas and of course coffee.

Polo Bar – 24 great British cafes and bars

Have you ever reached the end of your evening and thought, I could really devour a full English right now? Good, polo bar got you covered.

This great British cafe in Bishopsgate does a medium fry that’s sure to satisfy all your English cravings.

The full English breakfast here is loaded, so you better come hungry.

The plate is loaded with eggs, bacon and even a sausage wrapped in bacon with a side of fries, all swimming in beans – mouth drooling.

Terry’s coffee

Is there anything better than a good English breakfast? By that we mean, no fuss, no fancy decor, just fucking good greasy frying.

Terry’s coffee near Borough Market serves the best classic British plate with all the goodies you’d expect to find on a fry-up.

This classic family-run community cafe feels like you’ve stepped back in time. Red and white gingham tablecloths line the tables with flags hanging from the ceiling and the walls are adorned with black and white photos of Londoners’ past.

Fitzrovia Riding House

The Fitzrovia Riding House specializes in comfort food, so it’s no wonder it serves one of the best full English breakfasts in London.

This modern European restaurant is a relaxed and welcoming place to enjoy your breakfast filled with hanging plants, bare brick walls and attentive staff – just what you need in the morning.

From 8am, Riding House prepares full English breakfasts with a bit more spice than your average chips – think sun-dried tomatoes and barbecued beans.

Not a meat eater? The full English vegetarian also offers improvised dishes like grilled halloumi, potato and smoked piquillo hash browns.

Parlor

Parlor is a casual gastro pub serving hearty British food, and of course that includes a British favourite, the full English breakfast.

The lounge got the mission and didn’t mess around, full breakfast (no subs) follows English breakfast all the way.

Everything is cooked to absolute perfection, you won’t be disappointed with your bacon, eggs and beans here.

The lounge also serves The Half Nelson, described as the less intimidating version, this means a smaller portion or you’re allowed to be picky and replace your bacon with an extra egg.

The breakfast club

We couldn’t not mention The breakfast clubthe clues in the name as to why this restaurant cooks a delicious full English breakfast.

The Breakfast Club knows how to ignite that warm, fuzzy feeling in the pit of your stomach with a hearty English breakfast.

With locations scattered all over London, there are several Full English options to choose from.

If you want to do it all, The Full Monty has all the full English ingredients, including black pudding, hash browns and egg yolks.

Then there’s the Greasy Spoon, which is more like a normal sized full English breakfast, and Veggie Spoon has the best veggie sausages you’ll ever taste.

Beck’s Cafe

A short walk from Holborn station is Beck’s Cafea restaurant very popular with locals and others.

This British cafe is very popular so you can expect to queue, but we still think that’s a good sign.

Inside the cafe, red and white tablecloths line the tables and the blackboards behind the counter are chalk filled with plenty of specialties – but you’re only here for one thing.

Becks Cafe serves up some of the best fried food in London, with really generous portions of black pudding, sausages, bacon and fried eggs with plenty of toast to dip into your yolks.

Bohemian Cafe

Located in the heart of Soho, Bohemian Cafe is the perfect retreat from the busy streets of London.

The late-night bistro happens to serve one of the most affordable full English breakfasts in London.

Cafe Boheme offers their full English on a half plate or full plate, we love it for that time when you’re just not hungry but really want an English breakfast.

Plus, veggies can also enjoy a full English breakfast here too.

The decor of this bistro is quirky with mosaic flooring and red leather seating, it suits any seating whether it is breakfast, lunch or dinner.

Bill’s Baker Street Restaurant

Bill’s Baker Street Restaurant in Marylebone is a good choice for an English breakfast in London.

What sets this breakfast place apart from others is that in its traditional breakfast you won’t get just any sausage, but a Cumberland sausage, those are the little extras we love about this restaurant.

There is also an option for a vegan English breakfast in London here too, The Plant Plate offers vegan bacon and cumberland sausages as well as scrambled OGGS.

This breakfast spot is quiet and inviting with low hanging lights, intimate booths and vibrant colors, just the vibe you want to start your day off right.

Practical tips for enjoying the perfect full English breakfast in London

  • Come with an empty stomach, these fries are filling and the plates are stacked
  • Synchronize your full English breakfast with sunrise time if dining at Duck & Waffle – you can thank us later

London’s best full English breakfasts: menu

If you can’t get enough breakfast

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sign of the times | The story today https://abcingles.net/2022/11/09/sign-of-the-times-the-story-today/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 21:01:49 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/11/09/sign-of-the-times-the-story-today/ Ben Jones On March 18 this year, thousands of people from Britain’s deaf community gathered in Trafalgar Square to back the British Sign Language (BSL) Bill for third reading in the House of Commons. The BSL Act, which took effect in June, promised significant changes for the approximately 150,000 people who use BSL as their […]]]>

Ben Jones

On March 18 this year, thousands of people from Britain’s deaf community gathered in Trafalgar Square to back the British Sign Language (BSL) Bill for third reading in the House of Commons. The BSL Act, which took effect in June, promised significant changes for the approximately 150,000 people who use BSL as their first or preferred language. By granting legal recognition to the BSL, the law ensured that public bodies had a duty to promote and facilitate its use, helping deaf people to access public services. Among the UK’s minority languages, BSL has the largest number of monolingual users. The law is also a powerful recognition of Deaf people as a cultural and linguistic group, helping to reverse decades of exclusion. (Deaf with a capital “D” refers to people – most of whom are sign language users – who identify as culturally Deaf, while the word “deaf” lowercase describes people who are hard of hearing and is generally used in the history of deafness.)

It was not until 2003 that the British government recognized BSL as a proper language rather than a “communication tool”, despite linguistic research from the 1960s showing that British and American Sign Languages ​​(ASL) were complete languages ​​with syntax and grammar rules. The failure to recognize BSL in the 20th century resulted in terrible academic outcomes for deaf children who had difficulty reading lip-reading lessons and were forbidden from using “monkey gestures” to speak to themselves. A 2014 report showed that deaf people had worse health outcomes because they were often denied an interpreter.

Exclusion of the deaf

Speech, rather than hearing, has been at the heart of deaf exclusion throughout history. People born deaf or deaf before learning to speak (prelinguistic deaf) were placed in a special category. Until recently, the term used for these people was “deaf and mute”, revealing contemporary beliefs about the intellectual capacity of prelinguistic deaf people. Although considered offensive today, this language continues to appear in discussions of historical deafness.

In the largely oral world of pre-modern Europe, speech was important in various legal contexts. Roman law codes asserted that since deaf people could not express consent, they should be treated as infants. This meant that deaf people could not inherit property, marry, make wills or take a case to court. The influence of the Justinian code of law spread these ideas throughout Europe, and by medieval times they were firmly entrenched in the legal traditions of different countries.

Henry Bracton, a 13th century English clergyman, argued in his book, On the Law and Customs of England, that the deaf should be classified as “fools” and “madmen”. In Elizabethan times, magistrates were routinely told that the prelingually deaf were not responsible for their actions. In 1588, the antiquary William Lambarde asserted: “There is no one to be punished who the law has refused the will or the spirit to do harm”, namely: “he who is born deaf and dumb”. In the following century, John Bulwer, an advocate for deaf people, lamented the legal situation, complaining that prelinguistic deaf people were “regarded as misprisoners in the wild, and wanting to speak, are regarded little better than animals.”

Comparing deaf people with children or animals reflected broader philosophical ideas about their ability. Plato asserted that since thought was articulated by speech, the congenitally deaf were incapable of rational thought. Arguments that humans and animals were separated by speech only increased the belief that deaf people were cognitively impaired, displaying the now familiar double meaning of “stupid.” In the anonymous medieval poem The Spade of Conscience, the author wrote of “creatures that are dumb, and have neither mind nor skill.” The Enlightenment thinker Denis Diderot echoes this when he asserts that people born “deaf and dumb… can easily pass for two- or four-legged animals”.

“Talking with the hand”

The rationale for treating the prelingually deaf as infants was their inability to communicate. Except, of course, that they could communicate through gestures and signs, a rudimentary form of sign language. Throughout history, deaf people have spoken to each other, their families and friends using their hands, bodies and faces – much like today’s BSL. Although these conversations probably lacked the formal linguistic structures of modern sign languages, they allowed conversations between deaf and hearing people to take place. Some of the earliest records of deaf and hearing people communicating come from ancient Egypt, with text dating to around 1200 BC. J.-C. mentioning “to speak” to a deaf person “with the hand”. In Jewish Palestine (c. 530 BC), it was noted that in legal matters, deaf people could “communicate by signs and be communicated by signs”. Writing in the 5th century, Augustine of Hippo described deaf people who communicated with each other and with the hearing world through “bodily movements”, “gestures” and “signs”. Challenging the idea that speech was essential to rational thought, he asked, “What does it matter…whether he speaks or gestures, since both belong to the soul?”

In medieval times, signs and gestures were increasingly recognized as a legally valid alternative to speech. In addition to giving the deaf a voice, it involved the belief that the deaf were capable of rational thought. In the 12th century, Pope Innocent III issued a decree that allowed deaf people to make their wedding vows in signs; in the early modern period it was a widely accepted practice. In the 1620s, one of the Church of England’s leading lawyers, Henry Swineburn, could quote several different legal decisions from across Europe to assert that: “Those who are dumb and cannot speak, may lawfully contract a marriage by signs, that the marriage is legal”. ‘

Complex language

What signs did people use in early modern England? In Leicester, a churchwarden recorded in detail the marriage ceremony performed for a deaf man, Thomas Tilsey, when he married Ursula Russel in 1576:

To speak his mind, instead of words, of his own volition, [Thomas] used these signs: first he kissed her [Ursula] with his arms, and took her by the hand, put a ring on her finger and put his hand on her heart, then on her heart, and raised his hands to heaven, and to show that he continued to dwell with her until ‘at the end of his life. end, he did it by closing his eyes with his hands and digging the earth with his foot, and pulling as if he wanted to ring a bell, with various other approved signs.

This is one of many examples of deaf people using signs to communicate complex ideas with a hearing world. In the early 18th century, there is evidence that the signs used were not mimes (as in Tilsey and Russel’s wedding ceremony) but complex languages ​​that required special interpreters. When Abbé de L’Épée established a school for prelingual deaf children in 18th-century Paris, it appeared that his students were already using a sign language that had its own grammar and lexicography.

“Wild” signs

The ability to communicate by signs was seen as proof that deaf people were rational, but not by everyone. Beginning in the 16th century, many educators focused on teaching children to assimilate into the hearing world through vocal speaking and lip-reading.

In the mid-1700s, a Spanish nobleman, Juan de Velasco, sent his two deaf sons to the Monastery of San Salvador in Oña. There they met the monk Pedro Ponce de León, who taught the children to “speak”, in part so that they could inherit their father’s property. Like many monasteries, the monks of Oña used a system of hand signals to enable them to communicate during periods of silence. This may have helped Pedro Ponce teach the Velasco brothers. It was, however, his success in getting boys to talk that was celebrated, which allowed his work and that of his successor, Joan Pablo Bonet, to become known throughout Europe and to educators across the continent. attempting to reproduce their results. In Edinburgh, for example, Thomas Braidwood established a school for deaf children in 1760. Braidwood’s school taught its pupils to “speak”, which Samuel Johnson described as a “subject of philosophical curiosity”.

Throughout the 18th and 19th centuries, these two different approaches to educating the deaf rubbed shoulders, sometimes uncomfortably. While schools like the American School for the Deaf prioritized sign language, others encouraged vocal speech (called “audism” or “oralism”). Vocal speech was increasingly seen as a mark of civilization, with proponents of oralist education drawing on contemporary discussions sparked by colonialism and race to argue that sign languages ​​were a form of “savagery”. In 1880, an international conference of deaf educators in Milan passed a resolution banning the use of sign language in schools, with devastating effects.

Bad beliefs

At the heart of oralism was the belief that the signs used by the deaf were a poor imitation of spoken languages. Representatives at the Milan conference described the signs as “absolutely vile” and incapable of expressing abstract thought. This legacy has persisted, with sign language not officially becoming part of D/deaf education in the UK until the 1990s.

Sign language is central to Deaf identity. Providing legal recognition to this language – one of the most widely used indigenous languages ​​in the UK – not only gives deaf people access to education, healthcare and public services; it also recognizes the humanity, culture and long history of the deaf community.

Rosamund Oates is Reader in Modern History at Manchester Metropolitan University.

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The Wonder Review – IGN https://abcingles.net/2022/11/07/the-wonder-review-ign/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 15:34:38 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/11/07/the-wonder-review-ign/ The Marvel is now in select theaters and premieres on Netflix on November 16. Director Sebastián Lelio has made notable films including the Spanish-language drama Glora, its English-language remake Gloria Bell, and its formidable 2018 Best Foreign Language Film Oscar winner A Fantastic Woman. Each is both grounded and imaginative, with a lived-in, familiar quality […]]]>

The Marvel is now in select theaters and premieres on Netflix on November 16.

Director Sebastián Lelio has made notable films including the Spanish-language drama Glora, its English-language remake Gloria Bell, and its formidable 2018 Best Foreign Language Film Oscar winner A Fantastic Woman. Each is both grounded and imaginative, with a lived-in, familiar quality that makes up for any lack of visual embellishments. Unfortunately, his latest film, The Wonder, loses familiarity in the service of a mystery presented without mystery, about a 19th-century English nurse who travels to Ireland to investigate a miracle, unraveling a tale of deeply held beliefs. and even deeper regrets that read like demons on paper, but come across as mere inconveniences in practice.

The year is 1862. It’s been just over a decade since the Great Famine, and battlefield nurse Lib Wright (Florence Pugh) has been summoned to a small Irish town. She has been assigned, by the township elders, to watch over a young girl named Anna (Kíla Lord Cassidy) who some say hasn’t eaten since her 11th birthday, a whole four months ago. Lib’s job is to observe and verify, even if his sense of duty compels him to do otherwise, if only for Anna’s safety. The Wonder doesn’t really care about the “how” of the girl’s survival, but about the “why”.

Made from a screenplay by Emma Donoghue (which she adapted from her own novel, much like she did with the film Bedroom), The Wonder is designed as a story of stories, opening with a modern film setting before delving into the past. There’s even a voiceover that references the importance of stories and how people cling to them, setting up a story of bigoted religious belief that manifests itself in watching over a dying girl. hunger just a few years after a famine. Surely there must be reasons for this – whether good or bad, these are reasons that Anna and her family must still believe – and in trying to discern those reasons, Lib ends up exposing parts of his own. past, and his. tragic story, which shed light on his concerns.

The problem is that these stories (and the film’s own thoughts on storytelling) are far more compelling in theory than in execution. While young Cassidy delivers a haunting performance as a girl pretending to survive only on “manna from heaven”, Pugh’s character is more empty than reserved, due to a visual approach far too restrained for a story of lingering doubts that conjure up horrible thoughts and memories. The cast includes heavy hitters like Toby Jones and Ciaran Hinds, who play members of a board meeting to discuss Lib’s duties, but they’re made to feel like an afterthought. Much of The Wonder’s experience is akin to watching rehearsals filmed in pre-production, with little direction, movement or pacing to enhance what is clearly very heavy text, given the facts. which are ultimately discovered on several central elements. characters.

That’s all they are, though. Just facts, despite Ari Wegner’s warm, dimly lit photography that seeks to make the story intriguing, and Matthew Herbert’s creepy, ragged musical tones that are filled with distorted vocals and seek to dislodge your sense of ‘balance. Rather than using staging, framing and movement to complement these strengths, Lelio decides to abstain, in favor of a more observational approach – but what he observes is rarely expressive enough to speak of. -same.

The Wonder is the rare film where you might get the most out of reading a plot summary.


Lib and the film both meander in what should be a powerful (and powerfully self-reflective) narrative about how sticking to stories, beliefs, and rituals can both hinder and liberate. Even the handful of moments where faith is challenged, through dialogue, results in few characters where the audience feels shaken. And when the story does finally take minor twists – calling them “twists” or even “deviations” would be generous – it’s often hard to tell which moments are meant to be emotional highs, and which are lulls or connective tissue. After a while, everything seems flattened into a seamless mass, rarely stirring and almost never inspiring curiosity, let alone emotional intrigue.

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English National Opera loses Arts Council funding; Leaving London https://abcingles.net/2022/11/04/english-national-opera-loses-arts-council-funding-leaving-london/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 13:27:42 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/11/04/english-national-opera-loses-arts-council-funding-leaving-london/ English National Opera has lost its £12.6m annual core funding from Arts Council England. The news comes as the arts council announced its funding for the next three years, focused on moving funds out of central London. Instead, the ENO will receive £17m over three years to ‘develop a new business model’ and has suggested […]]]>

English National Opera has lost its £12.6m annual core funding from Arts Council England.

The news comes as the arts council announced its funding for the next three years, focused on moving funds out of central London. Instead, the ENO will receive £17m over three years to ‘develop a new business model’ and has suggested a move to Manchester.

In a statement from ENO, the company said: “Over the past four years, ENO has reinvented what a modern opera company should look like, building new audiences and reaching beyond London. That it this is to increase diversity on and off stage, in the pit and in our audience, to support important national institutions such as the NHS in their Covid response with ENO Breathe and to increase our presence on broadcast platforms and digital with brilliant opera work, ENO has repeatedly been at the forefront of innovation for the entire opera industry.

This continued, ‘Today’s investment offer from the Arts Council of £17 million over the next three years will enable us to increase our national presence by creating a new base outside London, potentially in Manchester . We plan to continue to run the London Coliseum, using it to showcase a range of opera and dance while maximizing it as a business asset. ENO has a vision and a purpose and we aim to support the upgrade program by reimagining opera for future generations across England.

According BBC“the annual Arts Council grant is more than double the box office revenue it earned in the year before Covid.”

Meanwhile, Arts Council England chairman Sir Nick Serota said there are “opportunities for English National Opera to become a different type of company working across the country. They are capable of reacting, in our opinion. They have excellent leadership. They have great accomplishments, and it seems to us that there is an opportunity here that we should seize.

The news comes as other major opera houses have also seen their funding cut, such as the Royal Opera House which was down 10%, Welsh National Opera which was down 34% and Glyndebourne which also saw a reduction of 50%.

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Insurer price transparency data vex developers https://abcingles.net/2022/11/01/insurer-price-transparency-data-vex-developers/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 21:34:29 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/11/01/insurer-price-transparency-data-vex-developers/ Alec Stein wanted to organize independent software developers to analyze health insurance data to determine what companies were paying specific providers for particular services. Stein, a data bounty administrator at software company Dolthub, soon ran into trouble. On July 1, mutuals machine-readable published public files including the negotiated prices they pay to in-network providers and […]]]>

Alec Stein wanted to organize independent software developers to analyze health insurance data to determine what companies were paying specific providers for particular services. Stein, a data bounty administrator at software company Dolthub, soon ran into trouble.

On July 1, mutuals machine-readable published public files including the negotiated prices they pay to in-network providers and the permitted rates for out-of-network providers. These trillions of awards require sophisticated software to analyze, and insurers don’t use standardized file formats, making it nearly impossible to compare their reimbursement rates. Additionally, the requirement for insurance companies to update their data every month to keep it current has the side effect of making it difficult for data analysts to assess information across the industry.

“Nobody appreciates the scope of the data,” Stein said. Uncompressed data from the five largest health insurance companies dwarfs the amount of information held by the Library of Congress, English Wikipedia and the entire Netflix catalog combined, he estimated.

Other software developers have encountered similar challenges working with this data, which health insurance companies recently disclosed as part of a broader federal campaign for price transparency. Regulators have asked for comment on additional upcoming transparency requirements. But before authorities begin to issue final guidelines regarding the advanced explanations of benefits and other transparency requirements, insurers, developers and researchers are lobbying the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for clarification on existing regulations.

The transparency in coverage rule, which emerged from the Affordable Care Act, aims to shed light on the long-secret rates that health insurance companies negotiate with individual providers, which can vary widely. Policymakers intended that providers, patients, researchers — and health insurers themselves — use this information for their own purposes. Hospitals and other healthcare providers could determine how they are paid relative to their peers, patients could maximize their insurance benefits by shopping for lower-cost care, and researchers could analyze healthcare spending at a high level.

But these early difficulties in accessing and reviewing this data hamper the potential for transparency to promote a more effective health system.

“There was a lot of hope that this data would really shine a light on these payor-provider contract negotiations, but we’re just not there yet,” said Sabrina Corlette, co-director of the Center on Health Insurance Reforms at the Georgetown University. “There’s just an incredible amount of frustration. CMS really needs to rewrite the requirements here, otherwise it will never achieve the policy goals set by the administration.

Big Implications for Big Data

The requirement for transparency in health insurance prices complements the mandate of hospitals. But insurers largely comply, unlike health systems, which have lagged to follow the rule. Within 100 days of the regulations taking effect, health insurers covering 90% of commercial policyholders had made their negotiated rates public, according to Turquoise Health, a startup aggregating data for sell to insurers, service providers and researchers.

“We have really seen the biggest carriers release important data. The implications of the amount of new price data are quite significant,” said Turquoise Health CEO Chris Severn. However, insurers have produced so much information that it will take five years for it to be useful to patients, he said.

Too much of a good thing

The files that health insurance companies have released are so large that a typical personal computer can’t handle them, said Michael Chernew, a health economist at Harvard Medical School who also chairs the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission. Chernew leads a Harvard team that aims to use the data to analyze price variations between insurers.

“We’re talking about terabytes of data, not even gigabytes, we’re one level above normal claims databases, and they refresh the data every month,” Chernew said. “Even if you thought you had a process to go through it, the way it’s released may change.”

Humana’s pricing information, in particular, has caused problems for developers, Stein said. The insurer has published its information in a different file format than that required by CMS. The company also doesn’t have enough server capacity to allow developers to upload more than eight files at a time, he said.

“If you wanted someone to do the worst job possible that was technically compliant and contained all the information, Humana did it,” Stein said. “Absolutely legal, but completely boring.”

Serif Health had to lease multiple servers to house all of the insurance data available, said Matthew Robben, co-founder and chief technology officer of the startup, which helps small digital health companies negotiate with large insurers.

Serif Health spent about two weeks downloading the full dataset from Humana, compared to the few days it took to retrieve the equivalent information from other insurers, Robben said. Humana was also the only carrier that failed to include required information on the difference between inpatient and outpatient service rates, he said.

Humana offers support through its website, where outside developers can submit questions and receive answers within days, a spokesperson wrote in an email. When Stein tried to use this feature to email the Humana developers, his request bounced.

Across the industry, developers struggle to work with information from insurers.

CVS Health’s Aetna lists multiple prices, with significant scatter, for the exact same services and sites with no explanation why, or when, different prices should apply, Robben said. “I would like to see CMS offer some clarifying advice to payers for cases like this,” he said. “If there is some kind of tiered fee schedule, can we be more clear about whether it is a title, location, or some other distinction that drives the differences in the displayed rates?”

Aetna’s files follow the format required by CMS and were not designed to serve as an estimator of member costs, a spokesperson wrote in an email.

Elevance Health, formerly Anthem, posted several repetitive and redundant files without specifying whether the networks listed are local or represent the nationwide reciprocal agreement between insurers Blue Cross and Blue Shield, Robben said. Elevance Health did not respond to interview requests.

The majority of insurers’ records listing out-of-network rates are empty, Robben said.

“As consumers of data, we had to do a lot more engineering and adaptation than we originally thought to work with. Probably more than CMS was hoping for with the settlement,” Robben said. There’s also the reality of contract complexity.” The differences between insurers underscore the need for CMS to host a single directory with rates listed in a standard format, he said.

That would be ideal, but unlikely, Corlette said. If CMS maintains the current fragmented approach, it should standardize the index used by insurers to explain where information is published and how to search for specific services. Requiring insurers to adopt common file naming conventions, standardize codes associated with individual procedures and organize different services into separate subfolders would help researchers, she said. And requiring carriers to release smaller files would expand public access to data, she said.

Making these changes wouldn’t require new regulations because it might simply rewrite the technical specifications required of insurers, but the agency would benefit from public input, Corlette said.

Insurers have invested a lot of time and money to comply with the price transparency policy. CMS should make sure patients can use this information before adding more rules, said Ceci Connolly, president and CEO of the Alliance of Community Health Plans, a trade group for nonprofit insurers. .

Next year, insurers will be required to disclose disbursements for 500 common services covered through online self-service tools. Next year, insurance companies will have to include personalized information for all medical services. Eventually, insurers may also have to disclose what they pay for prescription drugs, although the government has postponed this requirement indefinitely. Many of them law without surprise and coverage transparency provisions overlap, so CMS should work to align them and focus on how they will benefit consumers, Connolly said.

“You’re sort of piling up the requirements here, and it’s not clear to us that it’s going to be very user-friendly,” Connolly said. “It could be very heavy and it could duplicate work.”

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Dallas Opera’s Hansel and Gretel Serve Up a Visual Feast, for Kids and Adults Too https://abcingles.net/2022/10/29/dallas-operas-hansel-and-gretel-serve-up-a-visual-feast-for-kids-and-adults-too/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 15:26:59 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/10/29/dallas-operas-hansel-and-gretel-serve-up-a-visual-feast-for-kids-and-adults-too/ Glowing mushrooms, blinking eyes and dancing woodland creatures. All of these, and more, filled the Winspear Opera House on Friday during the opening night of the Dallas Opera’s production of Hansel and Gretel. The best-known work of 19th-century German composer Engelbert Humperdinck, it is sometimes considered a frivolity for children. But in this fresh and […]]]>

Glowing mushrooms, blinking eyes and dancing woodland creatures.

All of these, and more, filled the Winspear Opera House on Friday during the opening night of the Dallas Opera’s production of Hansel and Gretel.

The best-known work of 19th-century German composer Engelbert Humperdinck, it is sometimes considered a frivolity for children. But in this fresh and imaginative production from the Los Angeles Opera, there’s both poignancy and humor, with visual delights for kids and adults alike.

Director and designer of sets and costumes, Doug Fitch brings the fairy tale to life. He assembles an array of magical beings, from waltz furniture to two-legged moving trees and a purple gnome with glasses and a cane. The creatures effectively complete the story, suggesting what many of us imagined as children when we were scared or bored or needed a friend.

The most touching moments of the evening came from the production. Floating above the stage in a golden suit, the Sandman, kindly voiced by Lindsay Metzger, rained glitter on Hansel and Gretel, helping them fall asleep in the woods. The woodland creatures then emerged and danced around, later snuggling around the children, blinking their large, glowing eyes. The children were awakened from their dreams by the dew fairy, sung with charm by Gabrielle Gilliam, dressed in a sparkling outfit on an illuminated and moving decor.

But after eating in a gingerbread house, with a candy cane door and frozen ice cubes, Hansel and Gretel are trapped by an evil witch. Hansel ends up in a giant inflatable costume, but the siblings eventually outwit the witch and turn the gingerbread men into children, who join them in celebrating the witch’s demise. (The children’s choir, from the newly formed group Greater Dallas Choral Societyoffered both refined and lively contributions.)

Hansel (Kangmin Justin Kim, right) and Gretel (Elena Villalón) sing with a group of children during a dress rehearsal for the Dallas Opera’s production of “Hansel and Gretel,” at the Winspear Opera House in Dallas, on October 25, 2022. (Tom Fox / personal photographer)

The production was backed by an excellent performance from the Dallas Opera Orchestra, which sounded anything but a part-time band, despite some intonation issues.

Musical director Emmanuel Villaume seems to have completely absorbed the complex score, which draws inspiration from both Wagner and German folk music. Setting fast tempos, Villaume kept textures clear and balanced, and paid particular attention to changes in color and drama. The orchestra alternately sparkled, danced and blazed.

But what about the main characters? Alas, they were a mixed bag.

Typically voiced by a mezzo-soprano, Hansel was sung by countertenor Kangmin Justin Kim, who also starred in At Huang Ruo’s Mr. Butterfly at the Santa Fe Opera this summer.

Review: Despite the Promise, Santa Fe Opera’s M. Butterfly Is a Disappointment

Kim and soprano Elena Villalón as Gretel were convincing in their acting and boyish attire. Their voices blended beautifully into the central prayer duo, but overall they seemed too sophisticated for their parts. I also wanted more contrast between their sounds and clearer diction in the melodic lines.

In another unusual twist, Patricia Racette voiced both the mother and the witch. This gives additional irony to the witch’s phrase: “Come, I humbly beg you, will you join my family?” in the modern English translation by Richard Sparks.

As a mom, Racette directed Hansel and Gretel, but also revealed her soprano’s tender side by expressing her character’s desperation. But a video recording of his face shown on the house did not match the orchestra well.

Later, as a witch, Racette flew on her broomstick, wearing a frilly pink dress and a bright yellow wig. She took a fun and whimsical approach, but her voice was shaking loud and clear.

Mark Delavan wielded a booming baritone as a drunken father, but needed more poetry and coloristic variety. The domestic scenes with mom and dad seemed a bit rushed, even rushed, and weren’t always coordinated with the orchestra. In the same footage, a stray backlight shone annoyingly into the audience. The lighting by Duane Schuler and Eric Watkins was otherwise effective, helping to evoke the different moods and atmospheres.

The witch (Patricia Racette) uses her broom to cast a spell on Hansel (Kangmin Justin...
The witch (Patricia Racette) uses her broom to cast a spell on Hansel (Kangmin Justin Kim), trapped like a plump roast, and Gretel (Elena Villalón) during a dress rehearsal for the production of ‘Hansel and Gretel’ of the Dallas Opera, at the Winspear Opera House in Dallas, on October 25, 2022. (Tom Fox / personal photographer)

Details

Repeats at 2 p.m. October 30 and 7:30 p.m. November 2 and 5 at the Winspear Opera House, 2403 Flora St., Dallas. $15 to $482. 214-443-1000, dallasopera.org.

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