Letters – ABC Ingles http://abcingles.net/ Thu, 11 Aug 2022 12:04:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://abcingles.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-4-150x150.png Letters – ABC Ingles http://abcingles.net/ 32 32 Puzzles: Eliminating Subtle and Overt Forms of Racism – Santa Cruz Sentinel https://abcingles.net/2022/08/11/puzzles-eliminating-subtle-and-overt-forms-of-racism-santa-cruz-sentinel/ Thu, 11 Aug 2022 12:04:04 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/08/11/puzzles-eliminating-subtle-and-overt-forms-of-racism-santa-cruz-sentinel/ When I retire, I enjoy solving puzzles in Sentinel almost every morning, including “7 Little Words”. Imagine my discomfort on August 9 when I discovered that the solution to “ostracizing” was “black balls”. I know this is a syndicated product of Blue Ox Family Games and no one at the Sentinel is directly responsible for […]]]>
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Retired New York Lieutenant Offers Advice on Improving Homicide Clearance Rates – Chicago Tribune https://abcingles.net/2022/08/08/retired-new-york-lieutenant-offers-advice-on-improving-homicide-clearance-rates-chicago-tribune/ Mon, 08 Aug 2022 21:21:00 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/08/08/retired-new-york-lieutenant-offers-advice-on-improving-homicide-clearance-rates-chicago-tribune/ As I was patrolling the compound known as “Fort Apache” in New York’s South Bronx, detectives were asking me for help with their cases because they knew I had sources on my passage. How did I develop these sources? Talking to people, for example — and not necessarily about crime. One of those same detectives […]]]>

As I was patrolling the compound known as “Fort Apache” in New York’s South Bronx, detectives were asking me for help with their cases because they knew I had sources on my passage. How did I develop these sources? Talking to people, for example — and not necessarily about crime. One of those same detectives advised me early on, “Kid, you’re only as good as your information.”

Rabbi Seth M. Limmer and his associates are right to focus on decreasing homicide solve rates in Chicago (“City Can Reduce Gun Violence by Improving Solve Rates,” Aug. 5). This is not, however, a new phenomenon. Murder clearance rates have been slowly declining for a long time in the violent areas of our major cities.

As for what to do, I will refer to an op-ed in which I argued for uniformed cops to be assigned unsolved murders and instructed to contact family members of murder victims to let them know their cases. were still under study.

This would serve two purposes: it would help build trust in the community and it would potentially open the floodgates for advice or leads for detectives to follow.

—Andy Rosenzweig, former NYPD lieutenant, Westerly, Rhode Island

I applaud Kay MacNeil’s dedication to monarchs and wildlife, as reported in “’Butterfly Lady’ Sends Vital Milkweed Seeds” (August 7). It is more vital than ever to encourage actions to preserve and improve monarch and wildlife habitat.

However, I caution against listing the species of milkweed used by MacNeil without further context. Not all species listed are native to Illinois and may pose the risk of becoming invasive if they escape into the wild. Hairy milkweed is native to South Africa. Narrow-leaved milkweed is native to California.

The article mentions tropical milkweed, appropriately labeling it as non-native. When planted outside of its native range, tropical milkweed can disrupt monarch migration and promote high parasite loads in monarchs. It is crowding out native milkweed in some areas where it has been introduced and could do so in more places as climate change warms regions further north.

Finally, gardeners may recognize that the Hello Yellow butterfly weed and Ice Ballet swamp milkweed mentioned in the article are cultivars—human-raised versions—of milkweed. Although not necessarily harmful, cultivars are not the flowers that have evolved with monarch butterflies for thousands of years. They may not be as effective a food source as their parent plant.

I encourage those inspired to plant milkweed to consider their goals and potential risks before including non-native milkweeds or cultivars.

—Laura Noe, Chicago

As government officials review rules for refunding canceled and delayed flights, I would like them to also pay attention to the underhanded practice of non-refundable tickets. If you have to cancel a trip, the airlines will give you a voucher for an upcoming flight. If you can’t redeem the voucher within a specified time, you lose your money and the airline may resell your seat. He can double.

Shouldn’t there be a law that says if a customer can’t use a discounted non-refundable ticket, they can sell or give away the ticket as long as the new owner checks in with the airline in a timely manner For safety reasons ?

If I buy a ticket for a sporting event, a play or a concert and I cannot use it, I can give it away or sell it. Airline practices regarding non-refundable tickets are unethical, unfair and dishonest.

—Craig Goldwyn, Brookfield

It seems that the Democrats think that more public spending is the solution to our problems. The latest example is the Inflation Reduction Act which, instead of reducing inflation, may actually make the problem worse.

If Congress wants to do something constructive, it could start by cutting taxes, which would further stimulate consumer spending and thus revive the economy. Unfortunately, I don’t see that happening under the current Congress or President.

Fortunately, there is some hope on the horizon — the midterm elections. We can only hope that voters realize the dire situation and act accordingly.

—Dan Schuchardt, Glen Ellyn

As noted in the August 4 editorial on the consolidation of power in Hungary (“Orban of Hungary can thank the United States for facilitating his rise to power”), Prime Minister Viktor Orban and his Fidesz party were able to collect 67% of legislative elections. seats with only 49% of the popular vote using techniques familiar to the citizens of this country. Once the two-thirds supermajority was reached, they seized more and more power until the opposition was effectively handcuffed.

Unfortunately, American voters resemble those in Hungary. As Orban and his party consolidated their power by neutralizing the courts and the media, their supporters apologized and defended their actions. After all, their team was winning.

Sound familiar?

—Craig Zabel, Sugar Grove

Join the conversation in our Letters to the editorial Facebook group.

Submit a letter of no more than 400 words to the editor here or email letters@chicagotribune.com.

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Chapter 12: Strange Letters to Lewiston https://abcingles.net/2022/08/07/chapter-12-strange-letters-to-lewiston/ Sun, 07 Aug 2022 04:00:24 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/08/07/chapter-12-strange-letters-to-lewiston/ Shortly after Mary Elizabeth “Lizzie” Lowell disappeared in 1870, someone threw a mysterious letter into the backyard of Sophronia Blood in Lewiston. The handwritten epistle was signed by “Lizzie”, although it does not appear that anyone ever thought she wrote it. Addressed to “Miss blood,” the letter claiming to be from Lizzie said her husband […]]]>

Shortly after Mary Elizabeth “Lizzie” Lowell disappeared in 1870, someone threw a mysterious letter into the backyard of Sophronia Blood in Lewiston.

The handwritten epistle was signed by “Lizzie”, although it does not appear that anyone ever thought she wrote it.

Addressed to “Miss blood,” the letter claiming to be from Lizzie said her husband James M. “Jim” Lowell “will never see me again. I did wrong. I lied about him. never misused once.

He then told Blood to give Lowell all his clothes and “tell the girl that goes with Savage that I want her. [to] woo Jimmy and have him. She can never get a better one.

As if that weren’t enough, the epistle added, “Tell Jennie to kiss Jimmy three times for me.”

Lydia Blethen, a friend of the family, said the letter was clearly intended to infer that Lizzie was planning to take her own life.

But it struck anyone who saw it as more than a little suspicious that a letter claiming to be from Lizzie was so full of help for the things Lowell wanted, including, apparently, Jennie.

This was not the only letter signed by “Lizzie”.

A 19th century illustration of letter writing by artist John Wolcott Adams. Library of Congress

The missing woman’s sister, Georgia Burton, said she also received one asking her to “put my things in your trunk and take them” to her husband.

“Don’t let anyone know you’ve heard from me,” the letter concludes.

Both letters, according to Blood and Blethen, were filled with misspellings. Neither had the slightest doubt that Lizzie was not their author.

Lowell, who denied writing them, sent letters to Sarah Burton, Lizzie’s mother, on at least two occasions after his wife disappeared.

On August 4, 1870, he wrote to Burton, with the original spelling and punctuation retained, reads: “Dear Mother, I take this opportunity to reply to you kind Witch Letter which I received a few years ago days and was glad to hear from you I haven’t heard of Lizza Sence She only left what a girl told me She told me she saw her after the fourth She told him he was gonna leave the place for good and never see her win cause she should never rite for me georga was here last week and i haven’t had a scene since give my love to all and much to yourself So good By and good luck, by James M Lowell – I’m going down in a few weeks rite and tell me All the news.”

Burton said that as soon as she received the letter she walked over to Lewiston, confronting him when he arrived at the shoe store in Harlow.

Other letters from Lowell also appeared, including Lowell’s last to Lizzie’s mother on September 5, 1870, in which he claimed to have received a letter from Lizzie.

“She wanted to know if I would live with her again,” Lowell said. He added that he didn’t think he would do it with someone who “did like her.”

“I wrote to him yesterday and told him not to write to me again,” Lowell said.

Burton responded by telling Lowell that “if he would have the mercy to write to me and tell me where she was”.

But she never received another letter and never saw him again until they met in his prison cell in Lewiston several years later.

Burton said that based on her knowledge of Lowell’s handwriting, she believed he wrote them all, including the Lizzie-signed ones, “but I don’t feel positive about it.”

Georgia Burton, who said she saw Lowell’s writings on several occasions, said she was more certain he wrote the letters.

“I saw him write and I saw his letters,” she says.

She said she even talked to him about writing during a visit to the farm where he lived with Lizzie in Greene.

“You are quite a splendid writer, aren’t you, Jim?” Georgia Burton remembered asking her.

“Oh, God, yes,” Lowell replied. “I kept school once.”

A journalist from the Journal, who looked at them, was not so impressed.

He said they all had “miserable spelling”. Someone else called Lowell’s style “extremely primitive”, crude and ungainly.

Yet another writer who read the notes years later said that “whoever wrote the letters was so illiterate as to be unintelligible. It was even difficult to find the same mistakes made twice in the same way.

Edward Hale Bierstadt, who read them for his 1930 book “Enter Murderers!”, said it was clear that Lowell had written them all, ultimately only serving to tighten the net around him.

This is the 12th chapter in a series that will run every Sunday for much of the year. Follow the mystery here.

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Letters from South Dakota Penitentiary inmates reveal despair and call for change https://abcingles.net/2022/08/05/letters-from-south-dakota-penitentiary-inmates-reveal-despair-and-call-for-change/ Fri, 05 Aug 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/08/05/letters-from-south-dakota-penitentiary-inmates-reveal-despair-and-call-for-change/ SIOUX FALLS, SD (Dakota News Now) – Our Dakota News Now I team continues to hear from correctional officers, inmates and their families regarding the understaffing at South Dakota State Penitentiary. No one expects a posh experience behind bars. However, the claim of basic human dignity is not satisfied, mainly due to the shortage of […]]]>

SIOUX FALLS, SD (Dakota News Now) –

Our Dakota News Now I team continues to hear from correctional officers, inmates and their families regarding the understaffing at South Dakota State Penitentiary.

No one expects a posh experience behind bars. However, the claim of basic human dignity is not satisfied, mainly due to the shortage of personnel.

Lynn and her family have been friends with Paul, an inmate at South Dakota State Penitentiary in Sioux Falls, for years. The family was connected to Paul through a church program. When Lynn’s children were young, Paul created radios in many forms, such as airplanes and cars. He liked to create things for others; however, these opportunities have been eliminated over the years. Lynn, her husband and adult children now worry about her mental health and safety. The main cause can be attributed to a lack of personnel.

“It’s a kind of human desperation to want to be relevant; even if you did something wrong, he recognizes what he did,” Lynn said.

He designed and provided ideas for prison reform from the perspective of a long-time prisoner. Lynn thinks she has some good ideas that could benefit the penitentiary, but they fall on deaf ears.

“And he feels ignored all the time when he tries to talk to the warden or use the proper channels in prison,” Lynn said.

Paul copes with the stress and mental health issues of his incarceration while running. Unfortunately, the lack of staff has taken away most of the outdoor leisure time. He writes to Lynn:

“I’m so sick of life being a constant battle. In which I am unable to make any progress. I’m not ready to accept defeat and give up on life, but right now I feel so defeated. And as if I had been beaten to the ground, ”writes Paul.

Difficulties in receiving medical care compound the problem. His lingering stomach pains are dismissed according to letters sent to Lynn. He fears there is a serious health problem.

“He feels treated like cattle,” Lynn said.

Inmates continue to write, frustrated by the lack of hiring and maintaining correctional officer staffing levels.

“Improving staff safety and morale is something our system really needs,” one inmate said in a letter to Dakota News Now.

In another letter, the offender states that Governor Noem and the Legislature should not get away with it and continues:

“They are the ones who need to raise the salaries of correctional officers,” he said.

Frustration mounts with program cuts. A correctional officer and an inmate report that inmates have been wearing dirty clothes for five consecutive days due to the delay in receiving returned laundry after washing. Some inmates wash their clothes in a sink rather than waiting. The Department of Corrections says there is no delay in the laundry turnaround, which is the same day.

From our pile of letters from inmates is a comment about rising tension due to a lack of programs linked to inadequate staffing.

“Detainees sit in their cells for 21.5 hours a day. It breeds contempt,” the man said.

DOC spokesman Michael Winder responded to those concerns, saying:

“We will continue to strive to achieve appropriate staffing levels to restore any activities that have been modified or cancelled. It is an unprecedented labor market.

A correctional officer told our I-team: “Prison has always had problems, but now it’s like a third world country.

Lynn says the lack of human decency in the way inmates are treated is creating hopelessness and despair as tension mounts throughout the penitentiary.

“Taking away what little they have to give meaning to life, it’s only a matter of time before something breaks,” Lynn said as she read Paul’s letter aloud.

The correctional officer we spoke to did not want to be identified due to possible retaliation.

The perks keep it there for now. But, he says, “I’m going to hang on for as long as I can. I just try to go one week at a time.

Copyright 2022 Dakota News now. All rights reserved.

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Dean of UWO’s College of Humanities and Sciences provides back-to-school update https://abcingles.net/2022/08/03/dean-of-uwos-college-of-humanities-and-sciences-provides-back-to-school-update/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 13:17:26 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/08/03/dean-of-uwos-college-of-humanities-and-sciences-provides-back-to-school-update/ The arrival of August can only mean one thing… the new academic year is fast approaching. In just one month, students at the University of Wisconsin at Oshkosh will begin or return to college at one of our three campuses: Oshkosh, Fond du Lac or Fox Cities. Over the next few weeks, we’ll be featuring […]]]>

The arrival of August can only mean one thing… the new academic year is fast approaching. In just one month, students at the University of Wisconsin at Oshkosh will begin or return to college at one of our three campuses: Oshkosh, Fond du Lac or Fox Cities.

Over the next few weeks, we’ll be featuring Q&A stories with our college leaders and hitting campuses to find out what to expect in 2022-23. Today we begin with our Dean of the College of Letters and Science, Anne Stevens, who joined us in early 2022.

Anne Stevens

What’s new in your college for the next school year?

This fall, we will welcome 11 new tenure-track faculty in African American Studies/Communication Studies, Biology/Medical Technology, English, Environmental Studies/Geography, Indigenous Studies/History, Kinesiology, Political Science, Psychology, radio telefilm and sociology . Among these faculty, for the first time ever, we will have a faculty position split between the Fox Cities campus and the Oshkosh campus, Amber Lusvardi in Political Science. And a number of other new faculty contribute to more than one department and/or program.

Our new Director of Native Studies, Margaret Huettl, will be responsible for developing and promoting the Native Studies Certificate, and new African American Studies faculty member, Denae Powell, will help expand the course offerings for this program.

Kinesiology and Athletic Training will add two new faculty, Kevin Biese and Kyle Petit, to support this popular undergraduate program and the new Masters in Athletic Training program.

We are also hiring a number of teaching staff, including a Ukrainian scholar, Oksana Katsanivska, and we continue to hire new staff for the fall.

A lot of new equipment will be coming to the college this fall, such as replacing obsolete computers in the labs and some facility updates that affect the college. One of great personal interest to me is the COLS Dean’s new office on the first floor of Swart Hall.

What are you personally looking forward to the most from the fall semester?

I joined UWO in January, so I’m really looking forward to my first fall semester. My office is currently planning orientation events for department chairs and program directors as well as new faculty and staff. I am also delighted to experience the opening day and all the beginning of semester festivities. And of course, I can’t wait to get back to Wisconsin’s famous fall colors after living in the desert for so many years.

What advice would you give new freshmen on how to succeed at UWO?

The two pieces of advice I would give to incoming students and share with parent and supporter groups during Titan Takeoff are to take advantage of everything the University has to offer and to ask questions.

Freshmen should explore all the wonderful opportunities they will have while in college: working on campus through the Titan student employment program, getting involved in undergraduate research, and presenting at the graduation celebration. fellowship, publish their work in the Scholar of Oshkoshparticipate in internships, join campus organizations like Model United Nations, listen to campus radio station WRST, and cheer on the new Titan Thunder marching band.

Second, I cannot stress enough the importance of asking questions inside and outside of the classroom. When I teach, I always encourage students to visit their professors’ office hours and ask questions in class if there’s anything they don’t understand about upcoming materials or assignments. Usually, if one student has a question, many others have the same question, and everyone in the class will benefit from having the question asked.

Share something you learned over summer vacation.

I’m an English teacher so I read constantly. A summer read I would recommend is Percival Everett’s novel Trees. I liked Everett’s satirical novels, like Erasure, in the past, and Trees it combines political satire with a mysterious murder plot set in rural Mississippi. I also really liked Torrey Peters Detransition, babyand Nella Larsen Who passed, a classic work that had somehow eluded me until now. Apart from reading, I was also able to travel to Iceland this summer, so I learned a lot about the history, geography, culture and geology of this country.

Learn more:

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Illinois offers plenty of aid for high school students to complete FAFSA – Chicago Tribune https://abcingles.net/2022/08/01/illinois-offers-plenty-of-aid-for-high-school-students-to-complete-fafsa-chicago-tribune/ Mon, 01 Aug 2022 20:56:00 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/08/01/illinois-offers-plenty-of-aid-for-high-school-students-to-complete-fafsa-chicago-tribune/ We agree with Kahini Shah’s insights into the importance of completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid to make post-secondary education more accessible and affordable for students and to reduce student debt (“Want to make college more accessible? Make Students complete FAFSA.” July 27). Like the states Shah mentioned in his op-ed, Illinois also […]]]>

We agree with Kahini Shah’s insights into the importance of completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid to make post-secondary education more accessible and affordable for students and to reduce student debt (“Want to make college more accessible? Make Students complete FAFSA.” July 27).

Like the states Shah mentioned in his op-ed, Illinois also has a FAFSA requirement. In 2019, Governor JB Pritzker signed into law the state’s FAFSA mandate. In its first year of implementation in the 2020-2021 academic year, Illinois fell from 13th in the nation for high school FAFSA completions to No. 6 in the nation. When filings were down more than 4% nationally, Illinois was the leader among just three states that increase their FAFSA high school completion rate year after year, despite all the challenges posed by the pandemic. While the 2022-23 FAFSA remains open, Illinois is currently ranked No. 5 in the nation for high school FAFSA completions.

Illinois also provides the supports Shah cites as essential for completing financial aid applications. In addition to online resources and free one-on-one mentoring available to any student in the state, the Illinois Student Aid Commission supports the efforts of school counselors and schools through its FAFSA completion initiative. , which allows schools to focus their limited resources on helping students who have not yet applied for financial aid. The commission offers free virtual and in-person application workshops at high schools, community centers and libraries. (See studentportal.isac.org for free resources.)

We recognize high school financial aid application completion rates with rewards, and the weekly completion tracker on the ISAC website, www.isac.org, encourages friendly competition for completions between high schools . The free ISAC College Q&A text messaging service provides students with important updates and reminders about college access and financial aid. It also allows students to ask questions to an expert.

The Illinois FAFSA mandate and accompanying supports, with input from the governor’s office, Illinois education agencies, high schools, school trustees, and Illinois colleges and universities , make college possible for more Illinois students.

— Eric Zarnikow, Illinois Student Aid Commission, and Carmen I. Ayala, Illinois State Superintendent of Education, Chicago/Springfield

My wife and I love Chicago and came to the city one day recently to see the Paul Cézanne exhibit at the Art Institute, have dinner at a sidewalk cafe, and watch the live taping of the hit comedy show by WBEZ-FM 91.5 “Wait , Wait… Don’t tell me! at the Studebaker Theater.

It was also the first day of Lollapalooza, which made for pleasant people-watching on Michigan Avenue. But when we returned to the Grant Park South parking garage to pick up our car at 10 p.m., the fun certainly ended. It was only after we and many others were back in our vehicles and queuing to leave that we were informed that no one would be able to get out until Lollapalooza ended at 11pm. To make matters worse, we were all told to turn off our engines, which reduced the harmful exhaust a bit but also increased the heat inside the garage to very uncomfortable levels.

There was no way to leave our cars at this time to get some fresh air, use the bathroom or get water. Almost 90 minutes later, we were finally released from our parking jail! We were not informed either when we entered the garage or when we returned to our car that we could not leave at the time of our choice. I’m sure a lot of people that day were using the garage for events other than Lollapalooza.

We paid a large sum to park, and this situation was not only an insane inconvenience, but it could also have been a health emergency for someone or a spark to trigger road rage if patience had not not prevailed.

Whoever made this decision – Millennium Garages, the City of Chicago, the Chicago Police Department, or the planners of Lollapalooza – please learn from this and don’t repeat this mistake! It’s exactly the kind of incident that keeps people from coming to Chicago to enjoy all it has to offer.

—Philip Spencer, Naperville

My love for the original “Star Trek” runs deep. Nichelle Nichols has been a trailblazer and a glorious ambassador for her show, her role and her science all her life. And a really lovely person. May she have a wonderful adventure to the final frontier.

—Paul Bacon, Hallandale Beach, Florida

Join the conversation in our Letters to the editorial Facebook group.

Submit a letter of no more than 400 words to the editor here or email letters@chicagotribune.com.

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Letters To Self: English translation of PM Modi’s poetry book to be released next month https://abcingles.net/2022/07/31/letters-to-self-english-translation-of-pm-modis-poetry-book-to-be-released-next-month/ Sun, 31 Jul 2022 05:02:20 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/07/31/letters-to-self-english-translation-of-pm-modis-poetry-book-to-be-released-next-month/ ‘Letters to oneself’, the English translation of Prime Minister Narendra Modi‘s book of Gujarati poetry, will hit newsstands in August. Written over many years, the collection of poems “Aankh Aa Dhanya Chhe”, originally published in 2007, is translated into English by journalist and film historian Bhawana Somaaya. Buy now | Our best subscription plan now […]]]>

‘Letters to oneself’, the English translation of Prime Minister Narendra Modi‘s book of Gujarati poetry, will hit newsstands in August.

Written over many years, the collection of poems “Aankh Aa Dhanya Chhe”, originally published in 2007, is translated into English by journalist and film historian Bhawana Somaaya.

Buy now | Our best subscription plan now has a special price

It is published by Fingerprint! Publishing, a Prakash Books company.

According to the editors, the deep musings and ruminations, which came to life in rhyme and meter and which PM Modi has always been reluctant to share with the world, express his raw and unrestrained ideas, dreams and concerns on a range of subjects ranging from the beauties of nature to the pressures and trials of life.

“These are poems progress, despair, quest, courage and compassion. He reflects on the mundane and the mysterious, and mentions the obscurities he wants to untangle. I think what makes his writing different is his constant emotional bubbling, his energy and his optimism. He expresses himself without filters, and this intensity is contagious,” the translator said in a statement.

“His poems, his prose, however you want to describe his writing, strikes a chord, rekindles an old wound,” she added.

Modi’s Book 2020 »Letters to the mother‘, comprising letters he wrote as a young man to the mother goddess, was also translated from Gujarati by Somaaya.

According to Shantanu Duttagupta, Executive Editor of Fingerprint! Publishing, the “skillful and nuanced” translation is beautiful and will appeal to poetry lovers across the country.

Apart from several books in Gujarati, the Prime Minister has also written “Exam Warriorsto help young students deal with exam stress.

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Historic letters to be auctioned at Amesbury next week | Local News https://abcingles.net/2022/07/29/historic-letters-to-be-auctioned-at-amesbury-next-week-local-news/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 04:30:00 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/07/29/historic-letters-to-be-auctioned-at-amesbury-next-week-local-news/ AMESBURY – A ship’s passport signed by John Adams and a group of letters written by William Lloyd Garrison will be available to the highest bidder when John McInnis Auctioneers hold a three-day auction, starting with a collection of historical documents from the estate of Jacques “Jack” and Grace Weil next week. John McInnis Auctioneers […]]]>

AMESBURY – A ship’s passport signed by John Adams and a group of letters written by William Lloyd Garrison will be available to the highest bidder when John McInnis Auctioneers hold a three-day auction, starting with a collection of historical documents from the estate of Jacques “Jack” and Grace Weil next week.

John McInnis Auctioneers held an auction of items from the Weil collection last summer and is now moving on to its collection of historical letters, documents and correspondence. The auction will take place at 76 Main Street beginning at 10 a.m. on Thursday, August 4.

“We have articles from World War I and the USS Constitution, it’s just a treasure trove of historical records,” McInnis said.

Jacques “Jack” and Grace Weil were considered the most successful mid-20th century antique dealers in Greater Boston.

The husband and wife duo operated the Jacques H. Weil antique shop in Marblehead in the mid-20th century and also rose to prominence as Americana experts.

The Weils closed their shop in the 1970s and ended up storing their personal collection of antiques, which included documents signed by King Louis XVII of France and abolitionist poet John Greenleaf Whittier, in their Marblehead home.

Grace Weil outlived her husband and died in 2019. John McInnis Auctioneers owner John McInnis said Weil’s dying wish was to have his collection of ephemera cataloged and sold to those who would appreciate its historical significance.

“She was the sweetest, sweetest woman and was so thrilled to see all of these things ready to be auctioned off to give the public a chance to reacquire things for their own collections,” he said.

The auction will also include online and telephone bidding and will be the first day of a three-day “Summer Antiques and Estates Extravaganza” which will run until Saturday August 6.

“We have everything you can imagine. We have Civil War artifacts and furniture from the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. We also have paintings from the 17th and 18th centuries and there are all kinds of things,” McInnis said.

Among the Weil collection is a group of letters written by Garrison and addressed to David Johnson of Lynn in 1893 and 1894, and a letter from 1800 awaiting the arrival of the USS Constitution, after some maintenance and maintenance, written by George Higginson of Newburyport.

“Basically, it’s a receipt. They kept receipts for everything and it’s a chance for someone to own this privately and not have it in a museum,” McInnis said.

McInnis added that a passport for the schooner William and Mary signed by President John Adams in 1797 (not part of the Weil collection) will also be auctioned next week.

“They signed passports for ships to pass through our waters at the time and this is one of them,” he said.

Each day of the three-day auction extravaganza will begin at 10 a.m. and the Main Street auction house will be open for previews on Saturday, July 30 and Sunday, July 31, from noon to 5 p.m.

For more information, visit: www.mcinnisauctions.com/antique-auctions/auction.php?auctionid=519.

Writer Jim Sullivan covers Newburyport for The Daily News. He can be reached by email at jsullivan@newburyportnews.com or by phone at 978-961-3145. Follow him on Twitter @ndnsully.

Writer Jim Sullivan covers Newburyport for The Daily News. He can be reached by email at jsullivan@newburyportnews.com or by phone at 978-961-3145. Follow him on Twitter @ndnsully.

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Chicago’s new ethics ordinance deserves praise – Chicago Tribune https://abcingles.net/2022/07/26/chicagos-new-ethics-ordinance-deserves-praise-chicago-tribune/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 20:38:00 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/07/26/chicagos-new-ethics-ordinance-deserves-praise-chicago-tribune/ The cover of the city’s new ethics ordinance noted that it was “watered down” from its original version and pointed out that ethics protections did not stop criminal prosecutions of city council members. It misses the big picture. In the real world, legislation is rarely, if ever, passed in the form in which it was […]]]>

The cover of the city’s new ethics ordinance noted that it was “watered down” from its original version and pointed out that ethics protections did not stop criminal prosecutions of city council members.

It misses the big picture. In the real world, legislation is rarely, if ever, passed in the form in which it was first introduced, and negotiations are required to achieve a majority vote. Considering the extreme difficulty of passing ethical protections in Chicago in the past, this order was a real accomplishment.

The changes that were negotiated in the final version were not earth-shattering: allowing board members to stay on the floor after recuse themselves; remove city contractors from contribution caps, a measure considered technically unfeasible at present but which should be addressed in the future; and notifying Board members when findings of ethical misconduct are pending.

The provisions that were included, however, are quite significant: increasing the fines so that they exceed what many lobbyists might consider to be the cost of doing business; requiring council members to record details when they recuse themselves; and most importantly, by instituting a major expansion of conflict of interest protections.

Along with changes made earlier in the Lightfoot administration – removing leave and license decisions from the control of aldermen, so an alderman can never again hold an aisle permit ransom for their cabinet’s business lawyers; supplanting the prerogative of aldermen to enable affordable housing; and establishing a ban on lobbying by elected officials far stricter than exists at the state or county level — the city has made major progress on ethics. This is the real news.

No code of ethics can prevent corrupt criminal activities. Criminal laws exist for this purpose. But over the past three years, Chicago has dramatically increased the transparency and accountability of city officials and employees.

The mayor and the city council, and in particular Ald. Michele Smith and the Better Government Association, who spearheaded the initiative, deserve kudos for this breakthrough, especially in a city like Chicago.

— David Orr, Founder, Good Government Illinois, Chicago

Sigh. I miss the 1960s.

A July 24 Tribune article (“Renovations at Maine District 207 high schools in full swing”) outlines new safety practices put in place at Maine South High School, such as how visitors will be able to enter the school. Deputy Superintendent of Business Mary Kalou reportedly said: ‘You are ushered into a secure vestibule and greeted by security personnel (from) a glass enclosure. … They take your ID, find out why you’re in the building, and run a background check on you.

When I read this, I remembered an affair in high school that happened when a friend said to me, “Let’s pretend we’re students at Taft and go to the cafeteria at lunchtime. lunch ! Come on, it’s gonna be fun!”

Although I know she just wanted to see her latest crush who attended Taft, I finally acquiesced in her pleas. Luckily, both of us students at Maine South High School in 1967 didn’t get caught up in our little adventure. And, for the record, the “coup de coeur” and she ended up getting married several years later.

When I put on my mask before entering Jewel for my weekly groceries, I lamented again.

Sigh. I miss the 60s.

— Megan Bedard, Round Lake Beach

Letter writer Eric Hjerpe, in his response (“McConnell didn’t start it all”, July 20) to a letter regarding the failure to hold hearings for Supreme Court nominees in an election year (“How the GOP Packed the Court,” July 15), claims Joe Biden started the practice, but that’s patently untrue. Indeed, Biden suggested hearings be delayed in the event of a vacancy, but there was no vacancy.

If Hjerpe is a history student, he should also know that in the same speech he quotes, Biden said, “If the president consults and cooperates with the Senate or moderates his selections without consultation, then his candidates can benefit from my support, as did Justices (Anthony) Kennedy and (David) Souter. But if he doesn’t, as is the president’s right, then I will oppose his future nominees as is my right.

Stating a position is not the same as starting an actual practice.

—Stephen E. Jarzombek, St. John, Indiana

I have a suggestion for Illinois Secretary of State Jessie White: Just eliminate the expiration date on ID cards and driver’s licenses, because it no longer makes sense.

If the Secretary of State’s office were a private business, it would close due to poor customer service. With the need to update state residents, office customers, on their IDs, all White has done is extend the expiration date instead of extending office hours and d hire additional employees. He also failed to keep abreast of technology in order to streamline the renewal process.

For example, I changed my address before my last license expired, so I couldn’t renew online. I had to make an appointment to go to an office to prove my new address. The Secretary of State’s office already knew my new address because that’s where they sent me the notification asking me to go to an office.

Hopefully whoever replaces White will be able to make the desktop more responsive.

—Jim McGuire, Niles

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Letter: The current sad state of America leaves worries for the future | Letters https://abcingles.net/2022/07/24/letter-the-current-sad-state-of-america-leaves-worries-for-the-future-letters/ Sun, 24 Jul 2022 20:30:00 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/07/24/letter-the-current-sad-state-of-america-leaves-worries-for-the-future-letters/ I write because I am worried. It’s hard not to worry given the divisions that exist in our country. What happened? I don’t remember being so divided in the past. I fear we have become a nation of whiners. During the Depression of the 1930s, I remember men coming to our door asking to work […]]]>

I write because I am worried. It’s hard not to worry given the divisions that exist in our country.

What happened? I don’t remember being so divided in the past. I fear we have become a nation of whiners.

During the Depression of the 1930s, I remember men coming to our door asking to work for a meal. We were not in an isolated place. We lived in the town of Tonawanda near Colvin and Eggert, then called Guideboard Road. There was a railroad in operation not far from our house, from where the unemployed who borrowed the rails. My mother always cooked a meal for the men in exchange for cleaning the chicken coop or something similar.

When World War II broke out, the war effort boosted the economy, sad as the war was. Many unemployed men joined the service, including my two brothers. Yes, we complained about the rationing, but we remember the greatest sacrifice made in Europe and elsewhere.

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It hurts to remember those times. How to get the country back on track? My mom would have said, “roll up your socks and get on with it.” I am afraid that today many are waiting for help from the government. There weren’t many in the 1930s and we survived. Too much assistance leads to lifelong addiction, I’m afraid.

I guess being upset about the future of our country is a little unrealistic for a 90-year-old man. But I don’t care. In my later years, I traveled the world. I believe it is the greatest country, and I hope and pray for its future.

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