English Alphabet – ABC Ingles http://abcingles.net/ Wed, 10 Aug 2022 12:05:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://abcingles.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-4-150x150.png English Alphabet – ABC Ingles http://abcingles.net/ 32 32 Letters: The NHS still works well when needed https://abcingles.net/2022/08/10/letters-the-nhs-still-works-well-when-needed/ Wed, 10 Aug 2022 12:05:01 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/08/10/letters-the-nhs-still-works-well-when-needed/ The news seems to be geared towards the failings of the NHS. My recent experience shows otherwise. My elderly father took a fall on his way to Gartnavel Hospital for an eye appointment. He was treated by clinic nurses, who cleaned and dressed his wounds. They also arranged for him to be carefully evaluated by […]]]>

The news seems to be geared towards the failings of the NHS. My recent experience shows otherwise.

My elderly father took a fall on his way to Gartnavel Hospital for an eye appointment. He was treated by clinic nurses, who cleaned and dressed his wounds. They also arranged for him to be carefully evaluated by a doctor.

An x-ray was arranged, which fortunately showed that no fractures or fractures had been suffered, so he was discharged.

I was extremely impressed with the friendliness and professionalism of all the staff. These types of incidents don’t make the headlines, but they do indicate that the NHS is still functioning well when needed.

Thank you for making an older man feel like he really mattered.

Pauline Campbell, Paisley.

* AS relative of Jane Lax (Letters, August 6) I was asked a few days ago if I would be willing to go to Golden Jubilee Hospital in Clydebank for cataract treatment.

I live outside Dunbar, east of East Lothian. I had been on the Edinburgh waiting list for eight months.

The courteous clerk who phoned me explained that there was still a long waiting list for Edinburgh, but if I was willing to go to Clydebank I could be seen in the next few weeks.

My sight is deteriorating and at my age I want to be able to read as long as possible. Unlike Jane Lax, I viewed this offer as a very positive way to make the best use of limited resources. I accepted the offer with thanks.

Reverend David Mumford, Innerwick, Dunbar

LEARNING FROM THE PAST

WRITING with his usual incisiveness and insight, Brian Taylor (“Will Westminster and Whitehall rule supersede devolution under Truss?”, August 6) concludes by quoting Article 1 of the Treaty of Union, written in 1706 and ratified by Acts of the English Parliaments in 1707.

This affirms “that the two kingdoms of Scotland and England […] forever after, be united in one kingdom”.

The treaty can be viewed from a number of perspectives, both then and now.

Certainly, for the Commissioners negotiating on both sides – almost all landed gentry – the treaty maintained distinct Scottish identities in key areas of public life, such as law, equal to those of England and often of economic interest. staff for commissioners.

Yet one of the English Commissioners, John Smith, Speaker of the House of Commons, expressed a different view when he said, “We have caught Scotland and we will bind her quickly.”

The treaty, between two sovereign parliaments, was in fact a sort of sidestep from the start to keep the peace and open up wider trade relations.

As early as 1712 aspects of it were infringed and it can certainly be said that since then the relationship between the kingdoms envisaged by the treaty has been dynamic rather than static.

Regarding its durability, we can therefore recall the cynical and somewhat sexist vision of Charles de Gaulle on the evanescent nature of such agreements: “Treaties are like roses and young girls. They last as long as they last”.

The current debate, which some say is divisive, simply reflects an ongoing, centuries-old difference in perspective between Westminster and Edinburgh on the relationship between the two kingdoms. It remains to be seen whether, even after three centuries, De Gaulle’s insight holds.

What doesn’t help in the debate, however, is to talk as if the issue is between the people and personalities of Ms. Truss (or Mr. Sunak) and Ms. Sturgeon.

The experience of the American colonies in the 18th century and the experience of Ireland in the 20th century show that lasting relationships do not necessarily last.

Dealing with Scotland now could help current politicians in Westminster if they mirrored the mistakes of their predecessors with regard to these experiences. But it is not individual politicians who ultimately make these decisions, nor does a “dividing” debate create division rather than out of it.

Whether Scotland will return to independence or remain in a United Kingdom will in this century be a matter for the population as a whole rather than for the aristocracy and the Crown as in the 18th, or even a present-day personalized dispute between individual politicians.

Ian Brown, Giffnock.

KILLER CYCLISTS AND PUBLIC SAFETY

TRANSPORT Secretary Grant Shapps has promised a ‘death by unsafe bike’ law that will treat murderous cyclists the same as motorists.

Finally – someone who understands the problem of these dangerous, selfish and arrogant individuals who pedal on sidewalks, ignore red lights and have no way of warning of their approach.

Added to this is an even scarier new trend, that of delivery cyclists with one hand on their bike while reading their mobile phone, at high speed, on the sidewalk.

Kudos to Mr. Shapps for taking those first steps. All we need is the manpower to enforce these new laws and I, for one, will start to feel a little safer on the sidewalks downtown, where I belong. , and where cyclists do not belong.

Stuart Neville, Clyde Bank.

CHANNELING GOOD FORTUNE

LA good news reports that a father-of-five took his late mother’s advice that ‘a win leads to a win’ and invested his £3.70 winnings in two lucky draws for the London Lotto draw. night and won £1million (The Herald, August 6), reminds me of giving my young family a little lecture on the pitfalls of gambling many, many years ago at the mini-casino in the English Channel bac from Cherbourg.

The eldest, aged around thirteen, got up early and won £5 on the one-armed bandit, which she generously shared with her two siblings.

You earn it. You lose some.

R Russell Smith, Largs.

THIS FEELING OF BIRTH

YOUR entertaining golf correspondent, Nick Rodger, uses “lairy” to describe some of golf’s masterpieces. Assuming he uses it in his sense of ostentatiously attractive and flashy, perhaps he will quickly reveal where and when these events take place, as the advancing years increasingly inhibit my ability to attend.

David Miller, Milgavie.

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Women’s collection of postcards from writers around the world on display at the Freeport Area Library https://abcingles.net/2022/08/07/womens-collection-of-postcards-from-writers-around-the-world-on-display-at-the-freeport-area-library/ Sun, 07 Aug 2022 18:01:00 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/08/07/womens-collection-of-postcards-from-writers-around-the-world-on-display-at-the-freeport-area-library/ Kim Aluise has always loved paper and old letters. She writes to strangers all over the world via postcards, and they reply to her. Aluise, 49, of Harrison has amassed 350 postcards from people living in 45 countries and more. Around 40 of these cards are on display until August 14 in a showcase in […]]]>

Kim Aluise has always loved paper and old letters. She writes to strangers all over the world via postcards, and they reply to her.

Aluise, 49, of Harrison has amassed 350 postcards from people living in 45 countries and more.

Around 40 of these cards are on display until August 14 in a showcase in the Freeport Area Library.

Aluise is waiting for a response from someone she wrote to in Timbuktu.

Yes, Timbuktu is a real place, a region of Mali, said Aluise. The mail is transported by camel, and it takes about three months for a letter to arrive and return from there, she noted.

Aluise is one of more than 800,000 members of postcrossing.coma website that, for free, allows members to mail postcards to and receive them from random people in 207 countries.

“I had no idea an organization like this existed,” said Nancy Hagins, chief librarian at the Freeport Area Library.

As Aluise volunteers at the library, Hagins would hear the stories about Aluise’s latest postcard and thought the public would like to learn more about Aluise’s hobby and the international postcard-writing community.

“It’s amazing,” Hagins said, “that Kim can see our country and people from the perspective of another person from another country.”

Aluise has been a member of postcrossing.com for about a year and a half. She loves images from foreign postcards and stories sent in by foreigners.

“It makes mail much more interesting,” she said.

Although the exchanges between the postcard authors are “unique and complete,” Aluise said, they are fun and informative. Members provide their interests and contact details so that a stranger can strike up a conversation in a postcard.

Aluise continues to learn details about life abroad that she previously did not know: Andorra is a small landlocked country between France and Spain. In Denmark, only four out of 10 Danes own a car, but nine out of 10 residents own a bicycle.

And what do foreigners learn about Aluise, America and Pittsburgh?

Pittsburghese, she says. “Have you ever eaten or ‘jet-jet?’ ”

“It’s a great hobby for all ages,” said Aluise, who continues to wait for a postcard from Timbuktu as she writes new postcards for more international destinations.

Mary Ann Thomas is editor of Tribune-Review. You can contact Mary by email at mthomas@triblive.com or via Twitter .

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How Bishop’s Stortford inoculation pioneer Thomas Dimsdale and Catherine the Great came together to fight smallpox https://abcingles.net/2022/08/06/how-bishops-stortford-inoculation-pioneer-thomas-dimsdale-and-catherine-the-great-came-together-to-fight-smallpox/ Sat, 06 Aug 2022 04:20:00 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/08/06/how-bishops-stortford-inoculation-pioneer-thomas-dimsdale-and-catherine-the-great-came-together-to-fight-smallpox/ The first book by an Uttlesford author, exploring the unique relationship between a Bishop’s Stortford inoculation pioneer and Catherine the Great of Russia, is up for a literary prize. Lucy Ward’s chronicle of Dr Thomas Dimsdale’s battle with smallpox that stretched from Essex to Imperial Russia has been shortlisted for the annual Pushkin Book Prize. […]]]>

The first book by an Uttlesford author, exploring the unique relationship between a Bishop’s Stortford inoculation pioneer and Catherine the Great of Russia, is up for a literary prize.

Lucy Ward’s chronicle of Dr Thomas Dimsdale’s battle with smallpox that stretched from Essex to Imperial Russia has been shortlisted for the annual Pushkin Book Prize.

The award recognizes the best non-fiction writing about Russia and highlights books that combine research excellence with readability.

The Empress and the English Doctor have been shortlisted for the Pushkin House Book Prize

Lucy, 52, was inspired to write The Empress and the English Doctor: How Catherine the Great Defied a Deadly Virus after a casual conversation.

She and her partner Liam Halligan spent two years in Moscow from 2010 to 2012 with their son and two daughters while he worked as chief economist for an investment fund focused on the former Soviet Union. They now live in Saffron Walden.

“Inspiration struck in the playground,” Lucy said. “When I introduced myself to another mum at my son’s new school in England, she told me her family had a ‘Russian connection’ too.”

Lucy Ward, former Guardian journalist and freelancer, lives in Saffron Walden
Lucy Ward, former Guardian journalist and freelancer, lives in Saffron Walden

“I wanted to know more, and she told me – casually – that her great-grandfather several times had inoculated Catherine the Great against smallpox in 1768. I was immediately seized and made her say all the details while our children ran around causing mayhem. The story captivated me from that point on, even though it was another eight years before I could write it.

The family gave him access to a fascinating archive of Dimsdale’s personal papers, including letters to and from Catherine and his private medical notes documenting his post-inoculation progress.

Lucy said, “It took me a while to work my way up and adapt to some of the writing, but of course it was an amazing window into the story.”

Dr Dimsdale, from a family of doctors working in Bishop’s Stortford and Hertford, was born near Epping. After a stint as an army surgeon in Scotland, he was at the forefront of scientists battling smallpox, the scourge of the 18th century, and treating patients before Edward Jenner used the virus of cowpox to boost immunity against deadly human disease.

Dr Thomas Dimsdale (58320036)
Dr Thomas Dimsdale (58320036)

In 1767 he published “The present method of inoculation for smallpox, to which are added some experiments instituted with a view to discovering the effects of a similar treatment in natural smallpox”.

This groundbreaking work eventually brought him to the attention of Catherine II, known as Catherine the Great. As Empress of Russia from 1762 to 1796, she was the country’s last reigning empress and its longest-serving ruler.

Over the years her reputation has been marred by salacious gossip about a voracious sexual appetite, but Lucy said: “I want to bust those myths and demonstrate that the most powerful and historically significant thing she’s done with her body has been trying out cutting-edge medical technology and leading by example.

Catherine the Great (58320038)
Catherine the Great (58320038)

At Catherine’s request, Dimsdale traveled to St. Petersburg in 1768 to vaccinate her and was richly rewarded; his honors included a hereditary barony of the Russian Empire. A deep bond of trust and respect developed between the Quaker doctor and the Romanov royal.

After returning to Hertfordshire, he married his third wife and cousin Elizabeth in 1780. She was then living at 23 North Street, Bishop’s Stortford, now the Fordes furnishing store.

In 1780 Dimsdale married his third wife and cousin Elizabeth in 1780, who at the time lived at 23 North Street, now Fordes' furnishing store.
In 1780 Dimsdale married his third wife and cousin Elizabeth in 1780, who at the time lived at 23 North Street, now Fordes’ furnishing store.

She accompanied her husband when he returned to Russia at the invitation of the Empress and continued to write a memoir, An English lady at the court of Catherine the Great.

When Thomas died in 1800, aged 88, he asked to be buried in the Friends, or Quaker, cemetery, now a small park at the foot of Newtown Road. When Elizabeth died 12 years later, she was buried alongside him.

Lucy was born in North Shields and grew up in Manchester, but coincidentally her parents lived in Coopersale, less than a mile from where Dimsdale was born.

The former education reporter for the Independent and lobby correspondent for the Guardian during Tony Blair’s premiership, she understood the story during the coronavirus and used her journalistic skills to overcome research obstacles caused by the lockdown, including the ban on returning to Russia.

Lucy Ward at Thomas Dimsdale's grave in Bishop's Stortford (58320030)
Lucy Ward at Thomas Dimsdale’s grave in Bishop’s Stortford (58320030)

” I threw The empress and the English doctor just before the Covid pandemic, in November 2019. I never imagined that a book set in the 18th century would be overtaken by events! But as I researched the story and its context during the UK lockdown, I was struck by the many resonances I encountered,” she said.

“To be clear: Covid 19 is a dangerous virus, especially for certain groups, but smallpox was a devastating killer that could strike anyone and was fatal in one in five cases.

“Nevertheless, the impact of an epidemic disease on daily life was remarkably familiar: as smallpox invaded a community, markets and schools closed, courts could be suspended, people were afraid to travel and desperately sought to protect their families The pain of the loss of loved ones has resonated over the years.

“Similarly – and this is really at the heart of the book – there was widespread skepticism as well as enthusiasm around inoculation, the fundamental technology of vaccination, which came to Europe and America from Asia. and Africa in the early 18th century.

Elizabeth Dimsdale Book (58320078)
Elizabeth Dimsdale Book (58320078)

“Inoculation basically meant fighting fire with fire – giving a healthy patient a tiny dose of live virus to give them immunity – and unsurprisingly many people objected to the seemingly incomprehensible idea that deliberately making someone sick would ultimately protect them.

“The debates around risk and sanity that emerged at the time are still very much alive today, as we have seen with the emergence of Covid vaccines and discussions around coercion. Interestingly, the first written occurrence I found of the word “anti-inoculators” was in 1722 – exactly 300 years later, its successor “anti-vaxxer” is more widely used than ever.

“Nevertheless, as the story of Thomas and Catherine shows, confidence in new technology has increased dramatically over the century, so much so that in Britain doctors even foresaw the possibility of eradicating the disease. smallpox, nearly 200 years before the World Health Organization finally achieved that goal.”

Lucy hoped her second novel would continue her study of scientific progress in the 18th century. She said: “This meeting point of science, politics and culture is the theme I would like to explore.”

* The Empress and the English Doctor: How Catherine the Great Defied a Deadly Virus is published by Oneworld.



]]> How an online resource site for Jewish educators learns from and adapts to its users – eJewish Philanthropy https://abcingles.net/2022/08/02/how-an-online-resource-site-for-jewish-educators-learns-from-and-adapts-to-its-users-ejewish-philanthropy/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 09:55:03 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/08/02/how-an-online-resource-site-for-jewish-educators-learns-from-and-adapts-to-its-users-ejewish-philanthropy/ Ella Metuki watched eagerly as a Jewish educator searched for teaching materials on the Jewish Educators Portal. One of several user interviews, she would show Metuki, online educational content manager for The Jewish Education Project, which runs the portal, whether the $300,000 platform was worth the investment. The educator “found a bunch of resources on […]]]>

Ella Metuki watched eagerly as a Jewish educator searched for teaching materials on the Jewish Educators Portal. One of several user interviews, she would show Metuki, online educational content manager for The Jewish Education Project, which runs the portal, whether the $300,000 platform was worth the investment.

The educator “found a bunch of resources on JTeach.org… She said, ‘Oh, they’re really good, and I’ve never heard of this organization,'” Metuki told eJewishPhilanthropy. For Metuki, the educator’s reaction was a victory. The portal “exposed her to something she wouldn’t have otherwise heard of through her. [denominational] movement or by his synagogue.

It’s an experience many more educators are likely to have now that the portal has been updated with better search algorithms and the ability for users to upload their own content – technical changes that may seem small to you. first glance, but which represent a larger evolution of both Jewish education and Jewish community efforts to create digital spaces for professionals.

The Jewish Educators Portal is part of a new wave of platforms building on the failures – and sometimes hubris – of past Jewish initiatives online. The site aims to be a centralized library of Jewish educational content where educators can find resources for free, connect with each other in facilitated networks, and access professional development webinars. It is also a constant stream of data about the wants and needs of Jewish educators as they deal with mental health issues and have to explain global troubles to children.

The May 2021 conflict between Israel and Hamas was when the portal “saw one of our biggest spikes in usage and user account creation,” said Jonathan Fass, director general of the educational technology and strategy for the Jewish Education Project. “We might think that Israel is off the radar for North American Jewry…we certainly haven’t seen that on the portal.”

Launched in August 2020 with funding from the Jim Joseph Foundation and the Maimonides Fund through the Jewish Community Response and Impact Fund (JCRIF), and with support from GS Humane Corp, the site is built by Israeli developers for an annual cost of around $50. -100,000. Initially with 100 educational resources and 200 registered users with an account, the site has grown steadily: It now has 1,500 educational resources; 5,000 registered users; and 9,000 visitors per month.

The platform’s longevity depends on its ability to meet the needs of educators and its collaboration with other organizations in the field of Jewish education, Fass said. Sefaria, the Anti-Defamation League and JTeach are among the 24 official resource partners who publish their content on the portal.

At the heart of the Jewish Educators Portal is its search engine for finding educational materials, which was initially built around users searching for specific terms such as “Rosh Hashanah” or “Middot.” But that approach didn’t match the way people are used to searching online: typing in fuller phrases like “how to teach teenagers about Rosh Hashanah.” Some Jewish topics may also be spelled multiple different ways with English letters, further complicating the resource finding effort.

The new search engine solves these problems by operating with more flexibility than Google. “We use a search algorithm that partly explains the craziness of the number of different ways to spell Hanukkah,” Fass said, “so people can type in one way, but find everything they need. ” Portal content is also labeled with the age group and level it is appropriate for – something explicitly requested by educators.

The revamped search also means educators can more easily find resources that aren’t directly related to classroom learning, but have become essential for teachers going through a pandemic and political unrest. Since the portal’s launch, users have “searched for material on how to help children deal with crises, trauma and anxiety,” Fass said.

A collection of resources on the response to the January 6, 2021 riot at the Capitol has been viewed 468 times and saved 141 times. Another collection, for the treatment of the 2020 election and civil unrest, was viewed 488 times and registered by 100 people.

Drawing on data from educators’ research, Fass and Metuki put more resources on social-emotional learning and anxiety management in the portal for users to access, with the portal partnering also at the Blue Dove Foundation, a Jewish organization educating about mental illness and substance abuse.

But not all of the classroom-adjacent resources that educators find relate to the catastrophe and gloom of current events. Metuki marked Pride Month in June when many portal users referenced a pronoun guide from Keshet, the Jewish LGBTQ advocacy group. “Maybe they take it and adapt it and use it in the classroom,” Metuki said. “But it’s for us”, more than for the students. The pronoun guide has been viewed nearly 900 times.

As an online platform, the portal also tackles the difficult, and sometimes controversial, territory of curating material, an increased challenge now that educators can upload their own work to the site. Every piece of portal content, whether from partner organizations or individuals, is filtered before being uploaded, Metuki said. Individuals must have a registered account and provide identifiable information about themselves before they can attempt to post their own material.

“We make sure everything makes sense, all the links work, everything looks and feels the way we think it should be. [so] that it will be better presented to our educators,” Metuki said. “The same goes for the items that educators upload: we don’t edit their content…but we make sure it follows our community guidelines.”

The portal’s approach to other digital pitfalls is one of caution: the Jewish Education Project has no plans to sell user data collected by the site to the data brokerage industry. of $232 billion. And while it can be difficult to verify age online, the portal is designed to be an 18+ platform only to avoid any child-hosting issues. Part of verifying users is also to avoid nefarious actors, such as neo-Nazis, who might try to wreak havoc on the portal.

“We wouldn’t approve [children’s] accounts, we want to make sure it’s an adult community of adults talking to adults, so we’re very, very careful about that,” Fass said. “There are teenagers who create excellent materials for Jewish education. Unfortunately, we are not going to collect them.

Securing private and safe communication between educators is also a priority, Metuki said. User emails are not displayed on the site. Instead, the portal has a contact form that will deliver a message to the recipient user’s email. Only if there is a reply will the sender be able to see the other person’s email address.

But caution doesn’t prevent the portal from serving its purpose as a one-stop-shop for educational materials, Metuki said. In particular, she’s excited to be able to reach “educators, not on the coasts, not in New York, who don’t have as much access to resources, to professional development, to educators like them,” she said. .

She referred to a Jewish educator she knows in Nebraska who practices law in her daily work. “Our future is to reach more and more educators who do not have this access [to educational material] integrated into the work that they do, who could really benefit from it in a really robust way,” Metuki said.

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Mouse with a mission: ‘Henry the Field Mouse’ brings the family together https://abcingles.net/2022/07/31/mouse-with-a-mission-henry-the-field-mouse-brings-the-family-together/ Sun, 31 Jul 2022 13:02:18 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/07/31/mouse-with-a-mission-henry-the-field-mouse-brings-the-family-together/ Camas resident Sue Dockstader has mice in mind, as well as hedgehogs, foxes, squirrels, moles, rabbits, stoats and water voles. If these creatures evoke classic English country tales like Kenneth Grahame’s ‘The Wind in the Willows’ or Beatrix Potter’s enchanting books, you’d be, as the Brits say, spot on. The aforementioned animals all appear in […]]]>

Camas resident Sue Dockstader has mice in mind, as well as hedgehogs, foxes, squirrels, moles, rabbits, stoats and water voles. If these creatures evoke classic English country tales like Kenneth Grahame’s ‘The Wind in the Willows’ or Beatrix Potter’s enchanting books, you’d be, as the Brits say, spot on.

The aforementioned animals all appear in “The Adventures of Henry the Mouse”, written by Dockstader’s mother, Jo Coker from Gloucestershire, England. What started as a sheaf of old letters turned into a children’s storybook with two sequels, an intergenerational project that brought the estranged Dockstader family together in ways they could not have imagined. Not bad for a humble field mouse.

“I embarked on the project of having something to give my mother beyond a physical thing. I wanted to give her a sense of accomplishment,” Dockstader said. to be phenomenal. Really, if I never sell books, it doesn’t matter because I achieved what I set out to do.

Coker coined its mousy protagonist 20 years ago, when Dockstader, her American husband and two toddlers lived in Hong Kong. Coker wanted his grandchildren, then aged 3 and 4, to feel connected to their English heritage.

“My mother had this idea in her mind that her grandchildren were growing up in a high-rise apartment and wouldn’t know anything about where their grandmother lived,” said Dockstader, who also grew up in rural England. . “She wrote letters to children about the animals in her garden to give the children a glimpse of the English countryside.”

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NJ ‘meth mom’ found guilty of murdering her 17-month-old son Axel https://abcingles.net/2022/07/29/nj-meth-mom-found-guilty-of-murdering-her-17-month-old-son-axel/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 19:23:47 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/07/29/nj-meth-mom-found-guilty-of-murdering-her-17-month-old-son-axel/ CAMDEN – A 44-year-old mother has been convicted of murdering her young son four years ago. Heather Reynolds, who had methamphetamine on her person at the time of the toddler’s death, has been found guilty by a jury of the murder of 17-month-old Axel Jayce, Camden County District Attorney Grace MacAulay has announced. The boy […]]]>

CAMDEN – A 44-year-old mother has been convicted of murdering her young son four years ago.

Heather Reynolds, who had methamphetamine on her person at the time of the toddler’s death, has been found guilty by a jury of the murder of 17-month-old Axel Jayce, Camden County District Attorney Grace MacAulay has announced.

The boy has been identified by name by family and friends since his death.

On Thursday, after a nine-day trial, a Camden County jury returned the guilty verdict against Reynolds for murder, possession of methamphetamine and endangering the well-being of a child.

Gloucester Township Police responded on May 10, 2018 to a report of an unconscious child on a lawn near his home in the Sicklerville neighborhood.

A medical examiner discovered that the child was choked and had isopropyl alcohol and acetone in his blood.

Prosecutors previously said Reynolds killed her baby because he interfered with a romantic relationship.

Reynolds is due to be sentenced in October.

She was acquitted of a separate charge of conspiracy to commit murder, which was filed during the investigation into her son’s murder.

The same charge had been filed against Jeffrey Callahan, of Clayton, but was dropped as he pleaded guilty to witness tampering, as reported by the Inquirer of Philadelphia.

“A lot of people have worked very hard to get justice for this child. I am grateful for their efforts and appreciate the time and attention the jury gave to this case,” Camden County District Attorney’s Office Homicide Section Chief Peter Gallagher said in a statement. written.

Erin Vogt is a reporter and anchor for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach her at erin.vogt@townsquaremedia.com

Click here to contact an editor about a comment or correction for this story.

What would happen to NJ if we were attacked by nuclear weapons?

We used NUKEMAP by Alex Wellerstein to see what would happen if a nuclear warhead hit New York, Philadelphia, Washington or New Jersey.

Models show what would happen during an air detonation, meaning the bomb would be detonated into the sky, causing extensive damage to structures and people below; or what would happen in a detonation on the ground, which would have the alarming result of nuclear fallout. The models do not take into account the number of casualties that would result from the fallout.

Illegal Baby Names

WATCH: Baby names that are illegal around the world

Stacker scoured hundreds of baby name databases and press releases to compile a list of illegal baby names somewhere in the world, along with explanations of why they are banned.

50 Largest Retailers in America

WATCH: These are the 50 largest retailers in America

Breathtaking images from space

WATCH: 31 jaw-dropping images from the NASA Public Library

In 2017, NASA opened the digital doors to its photo library and video library giving the public access to more than 140,000 images, videos and audio files. The collection offers unprecedented views of space. Stacker reviewed the collection to select 31 of the most breathtaking images, including the first from the James Webb Space Telescope. Keep reading to see these stunning images, curated with more information about the scenes captured.

What are the chances of these 50 random events happening to you?

WATCH: What are the odds of these 50 totally random events happening to you?

Stacker took the guesswork of 50 random events to determine how likely they are to actually happen. They drew their information from government statistics, scientific papers and other primary documents. Read on to find out why parents-to-be shouldn’t rely on due dates — and why you should be more worried about dying on your birthday than living to 100.

Cape May: wonderful places to visit

Cape May, NJ: 15 Wonderful Places to Visit

Beautiful Sunflower Fields to Visit in New Jersey 2022

Beautiful Sunflower Fields to Visit in New Jersey 2022

Among the reasons why the “Garden State” remains an apt nickname for New Jersey – the end of summer means the arrival of sunflower season.

There are at least six domains, spanning the state. Some are in bloom as early as early August, while others should peak from late August to late September.

It is always advisable to call or email before you go if the weather seems to be an issue.

[Places to visit in Seaside Heights and Seaside Park

15 sensational places to visit in Seaside Heights and Seaside Park

From amusement rides to all the boardwalk food and lots of water fun, Seaside Heights and neighboring Seaside Park have endured as a family friendly spot for all ages.

Along the way, the Seaside Heights Boardwalk and Casino Pier have been struck with tragic disasters – such as fire, Superstorm Sandy and another fire. Both have proven their resiliency through rebuilding and expansion.

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Here’s where NJ legal weed is sold

Here’s where NJ legal weed is sold

The number of recreational cannabis dispensaries continues to grow, with close to two dozen state approvals given since the first adult recreational sales in the state back in April. Here is where the open sites are located.

Must-drive roads in every state

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Netflix’s Most Popular TV Shows Ever

Netflix’s Most Popular English-Language TV Shows Ever

These are the most popular TV shows ever on Netflix (in English), based on hours viewed in their first 28 days on streaming.

Unbelievably Expensive Divorces

These are the best hiking spots in New Jersey

These are the best hiking spots in New Jersey

A trip to New Jersey doesn’t have to be all about the beach. Our state has some incredible trails, waterfalls, and lakes to enjoy.

From the Pine Barrens to the Appalachian Trail to the hidden gems of New Jersey, you have plenty of options for a great hike. Hiking is such a great way to spend time outdoors and enjoy nature, plus it’s a great workout.

Before you go out on the trails and explore some of our listeners’ suggestions, I have some tips on hiking etiquette from the American Hiking Society.

If you are going downhill and run into an uphill hiker, step to the side and give the uphill hiker space. A hiker going uphill has the right of way unless they stop to catch their breath.

Always stay on the trail, you may see side paths, unless they are marked as an official trail, steer clear of them. By going off-trail you may cause damage to the ecosystems around the trail, the plants, and wildlife that live there.

You also do not want to disturb the wildlife you encounter, just keep your distance from the wildlife and continue hiking.

Bicyclists should yield to hikers and horses. Hikers should also yield to horses, but I’m not sure how many horses you will encounter on the trails in New Jersey.

If you are thinking of bringing your dog on your hike, they should be leashed, and make sure to clean up all pet waste.

Lastly, be mindful of the weather, if the trail is too muddy, it’s probably best to save your hike for another day.

I asked our listeners for their suggestions of the best hiking spots in New Jersey, check out their suggestions:

New Jersey’s license plates through the years

New Jersey’s license plate designs through the years

Every NJ pizzeria Barstool’s Dave Portnoy has reviewed

Every NJ pizza joint Barstool’s Dave Portnoy has reviewed

Dave Portnoy, commonly known as El Presidente, is the founder of Barstool Sports. Somewhere along the way, he decided to start reviewing local pizzerias, and the concept took off. Here is every New Jersey pizzeria Dave has stopped in, along with the score he gave them.

New Jersey’s new legislative districts for the 2020s

New Jersey’s new legislative districts for the 2020s

Boundaries for the 40 legislative districts for the Senate and Assembly elections of 2023 through 2029, and perhaps 2031, were approved in a bipartisan vote of the Apportionment Commission on Feb. 18, 2022. The map continues to favor Democrats, though Republicans say it gives them a chance to win the majority.

NJ Diners that are open 24/7

NJ Diners that are open 24/7

2021 NJ property taxes: See how your town compares

2021 NJ property taxes: See how your town compares

Find your municipality in this alphabetical list to see how its average property tax bill for 2021 compares to others. You can also see how much the average bill changed from 2020. For an interactive map version, click here. And for the full analysis by New Jersey 101.5, read this story.

Update: NJ arrests in Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol riot

Update: NJ arrests in Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol riot

A year later, more than 20 people from New Jersey have been charged with involvement in the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol.

New Jersey’s smallest towns by population

New Jersey’s smallest towns by population

New Jersey’s least populated municipalities, according to the 2020 Census. This list excludes Pine Valley, which would have been the third-smallest with 21 residents but voted to merge into Pine Hill at the start of 2022.

Nasty NJ town nicknames
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Nasty NJ town nicknames — Have you heard of them?

Dennis & Judi asked their listeners for the nasty nicknames they’ve heard their towns referred to. How many have you heard? Which ones would you add?

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Access the Holland Tunnel without paying a toll

How to get from Monmouth/Ocean to the Holland Tunnel without paying a toll

Sometimes even your GPS doesn’t know the way back to certain places.

Inventions You Probably Didn’t Know Were Born in New Jersey

Inventions You Probably Didn’t Know Were Born in New Jersey

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Azeem Rafiq: England’s Cricket Board ‘not fit for purpose’ https://abcingles.net/2022/07/25/azeem-rafiq-englands-cricket-board-not-fit-for-purpose/ Mon, 25 Jul 2022 12:40:14 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/07/25/azeem-rafiq-englands-cricket-board-not-fit-for-purpose/ Photo by Tom Jenkins/Guardian/eyevine Former Yorkshire County cricketer Azeem Rafiq has called for a ‘total dump’ of the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB). Asked in an interview with the new statesman, while he believed the sport’s governing body had taken significant action since his damning testimony on racism in cricket to parliament last year, […]]]>

Former Yorkshire County cricketer Azeem Rafiq has called for a ‘total dump’ of the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB). Asked in an interview with the new statesman, while he believed the sport’s governing body had taken significant action since his damning testimony on racism in cricket to parliament last year, he said: ‘The ECB is not fit for purpose , as simple as that. We need a total cleaning. I said in January that the ECB needed a reset of its morals and values, and I firmly believe that nothing has changed. Cricket is too much a boys’ network: we need structural change. We need government involvement, and an independent regulator, because gambling cannot be trusted to self-regulate.

Yesterday (July 24) the entire Cricket Scotland board resigned ahead of the publication of an independent report confirming accusations of ‘institutional racism’ within the sport and its governing body in the country. The outgoing directors issued an apology: “We are all truly sorry and have publicly apologized to anyone who has experienced racism or any other form of discrimination in cricket in Scotland.” The survey, conducted by Plan4Sport, a company that works on equality and inclusion, collected testimony from more than 200 people and was prompted in part by Rafiq’s revelations; Scotland’s main wicket-taker Majid Haq and Qasim Sheikh had raised similar allegations of racism and discrimination.

Rafiq, 31, a former England youth captain, spoke to the new statesman for an article to be published in this week’s edition of the magazine on the wider impact of his testimony on the game. Immediately after his appearance before the MPs of the Select Committee for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport on 16 November 2021, 16 members of Yorkshire County Cricket Club’s coaching staff were dismissed or resigned, and its chairman, Roger Hutton, resigned. Rafiq said racist taunts were “constantly used” at the club and alleged a “toxic” atmosphere tolerated and encouraged by its leaders.

ECB chief executive Tom Harrison resigned in May and former England women’s captain Clare Connor was appointed as her interim replacement.

The ECB has promised that the game is about to change significantly and has issued regular updates on its most recent action plan, which covers everything from whistleblower procedures to board diversification. . Later this year, the ECB’s independent equities committee will deliver its findings. In May, Essex County Cricket Club were fined £50,000 for racist language used by their then-chairman at a meeting in 2017. A man was arrested after Indian fans reported racist abuse at Edgbaston during an England-India T20 game in July.


Rafiq said, however, that on a structural level there has not been enough change since he raised his complaints against Yorkshire in 2020. “We are coming to two years since I spoke, and where we find the game I think is embarrassing.. The system is always looking for excuses not to act. fundamental issues. It’s about understanding where the game went wrong. I used to think people just didn’t understand, but I’ve come to a different conclusion now. I think the leaders don’t want to get it.

[See also: The long shadows over English cricket]

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A teacher’s lesson from children: Good news in Midland https://abcingles.net/2022/07/23/a-teachers-lesson-from-children-good-news-in-midland/ Sat, 23 Jul 2022 09:08:18 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/07/23/a-teachers-lesson-from-children-good-news-in-midland/ Each school year, when preparing the classroom for the arrival of the children, I would decorate a small bulletin board with the heading “Super Star”. It was the space reserved for children, during the draw of their name. They could bring special items from home for the painting that awaited them. They brought photos, certificates, […]]]>

Each school year, when preparing the classroom for the arrival of the children, I would decorate a small bulletin board with the heading “Super Star”. It was the space reserved for children, during the draw of their name. They could bring special items from home for the painting that awaited them. They brought photos, certificates, ribbons, etc. The items were left for about three or four days and then another name was drawn. It was their time to talk about themselves and answer questions.

I felt then, and still feel, that it was important for every child to take advantage of this opportunity and feel very special. Even shy children have come forward and grown through this activity. Some children wanted me to sit next to them, others were happy on their own while they shared.

One year, when I was in third grade, I had an idea that I hoped would help them look at our community and, rather than focusing on themselves, become aware of the accomplishments and the lives of others. In January, after the Christmas holidays, they entered the room with a new title on a larger bulletin board. It said, “Good news in Midland.” This caught their attention and they gathered around, whispering and wondering what it was all about.

Here is the letter I sent home to the parents, explaining the new activity.


“Dear Parents,

Sharing is always an important part of our day. Many teaching skills take place at this time. Plus, I’m a strong believer in unity, setting the tone, and caring about each other. The children did well in this activity. Thank you for your home help. As we enter the second half of the school year, I feel a great responsibility towards the children and I believe that the sharing time must take a new direction. We have, for the most part, focused on ourselves. While this “me” will always have a place and a value in our class, the “sharing board” can become a competitive and materialistic activity, if it is prolonged. Therefore, we discussed a positive change. The children are delighted and can’t wait to get started! Each child will have an assigned sharing day once a week. The child will read the Midland Daily News at home. We will bring to school that day, “good news” from the town of Midland. It is truly an opportunity for sharing but rather than focusing on ourselves, we will be applauding another for a job well done. It will help if it is someone whose address I am able to locate.

We will take this activity a little further. The “Good News” article will be pinned to our bulletin board, along with others, for our enjoyment. At the end of the week, each of us will write a letter to “Our Midland Star”. I will then send all of our letters (including mine) to our person or place of business which we have recognized among the third graders of Blessed Sacrament School. I designed special stationery just for their letters and the kids drew themselves on the stationery. Their precious faces are along the border of the fixed. It’s above and beyond any stationery you’ll find in a store. Imagine receiving an envelope with 30 letters written in the hands and hearts of children!

This activity combines reading, writing, religion, social studies, spelling, speaking, English and much more. I hope it expands our world as we appreciate the accomplishments of others and see the good all around us. This may encourage us to set our own goals.

Parents, I know we will have your interest and support as we have for all our activities in the past. We cannot do this alone. Your encouragement in everything we do is the reason we enjoy happy and successful days. Please come in and see our bulletin board anytime! It belongs to you too!

Examples of good news include: a local student receiving an award or special achievement, a business that has been recognized, local student art or literature, a photo of a citizen at work or on the train to play, a birthday or anniversary, or any other success story of interest to the child.

What a lesson for me! Of course, children enjoy sharing their own interests and accomplishments with their class family. I have learned, however, that they have a desire to reach out to others in their own community. They deserved this opportunity. I didn’t keep any of the letters, although I would have liked to have them.

Try to imagine for a minute, what they had to say when someone was celebrating a 100e birthday! I smile thinking about it. The letters were written on the stationery without any changes on my part. Knowing that their letters would not be turned over for editing gave them the freedom to express their thoughts. I’m sure somewhere in our little town someone’s day brightened up when their mail arrived. Very often a note or even a small gift was delivered to the office for the third grade class by the lucky recipient of their letters. I can still see the children gathered around the bulletin board discussing the articles and the people involved.

Although they are only 8 and 9 years old, they have become aware of the positive life of the citizens of their own community. I was very proud of them and they were aware of it, but the important thing was that they were proud of them! Nice job kids! Thank you for teaching me well!

Perhaps a teacher reading my column will decide to incorporate this into their own curriculum. What a blessing that would be!

Sharon Capriccioso taught at Blessed Sacrament School for over 20 years. Here she writes about the lessons learned from her students. His lessons will appear the fourth weekend of each month in the Opinion section.

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Merck Drug sees failures in head and neck cancer treatment https://abcingles.net/2022/07/21/merck-drug-sees-failures-in-head-and-neck-cancer-treatment/ Thu, 21 Jul 2022 13:00:20 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/07/21/merck-drug-sees-failures-in-head-and-neck-cancer-treatment/ Keytruda, a cancer drug from Merck, failed to improve the duration of event-free survival in patients with head and neck cancer. Doctors joining unions, nurse burnout, nurses working remotely, rising healthcare industry profit projections, and more are also making industry news. Reuters: Merck’s Keytruda fails head and neck cancer trial Merck & Co Inc said […]]]>

Keytruda, a cancer drug from Merck, failed to improve the duration of event-free survival in patients with head and neck cancer. Doctors joining unions, nurse burnout, nurses working remotely, rising healthcare industry profit projections, and more are also making industry news.

Reuters: Merck’s Keytruda fails head and neck cancer trial

Merck & Co Inc said Wednesday that its cancer treatment Keytruda failed to meet the primary endpoint of a late-stage trial testing it in patients with head and neck cancer. The company said Keytruda, its blockbuster cancer drug, in combination with chemoradiation therapy showed improved event-free survival, or the length of time a patient remains complication-free compared to a placebo. (7/20)

In news on health worker issues —

Bloomberg: Nurse burnout hits new high with latest Omicron variant surges

Lots of people may be leaving Covid, but nurses certainly aren’t – and as the latest variant sweeps across the US, mental strains on the profession have reached new heights. A survey of 2,500 nurses released on Wednesday found that 64% are considering leaving the healthcare profession, an increase of nearly 40% from a similar survey a year ago. Three-quarters of those surveyed said they had suffered from burnout since the start of the pandemic and half said they had experienced feelings of trauma, extreme stress or PTSD. (Johnson, 7/20)

On other industry developments –

Bloomberg: Apple says it’s now a major force in healthcare

Apple Inc. on Wednesday released a nearly 60-page report outlining all of its health features and partnerships with medical institutions, saying such offerings are key to the tech giant’s future. The company highlighted the breadth of its existing services – from sleep monitoring and fitness classes to atrial fibrillation detection and cycle tracking – and promised to build on this foundation. Chief Operating Officer Jeff Williams, who oversees Apple’s health efforts, said in a statement attached to the report that the company will continue to innovate in “science-based technologies.” (Gourman, 07/20)

Bloomberg: Spotify’s top backer invests $101 million in mental health company

A Swedish nonprofit focused on improving the mental wellbeing of young adults has attracted 100 million euros ($101 million) in funding from its founders, Annika Sten Parson and Par-Jorgen Parson. The Inner Foundation was created by the husband and wife duo this year and has already made several investments, including Meela, a platform offering personalized therapy for women, and StrongMinds, a nonprofit for the treatment of depression in Sub-Saharan Africa. . (Liman, 07/21)

Reuters: Biogen relies on new Alzheimer’s drug to ease investor concerns

Biogen Inc (BIIB.O) tried to assuage investor concerns on Wednesday by laying out a plan for its Alzheimer’s disease drug being developed with Eisai Co Ltd (4523.T) and promising to learn lessons of the setbacks of his Aduhelm treatment. Biogen also revealed that it agreed to pay $900 million to resolve a whistleblower lawsuit accusing it of paying bribes to doctors to prescribe multiple sclerosis drugs. The case was due to go to trial next week in Boston. He did not admit any wrongdoing. (Misha, 07/20)

Also: How the healthcare system got in the way of a couple’s quest for autism care –

KHN: ‘So Rudderless’: Couple’s quest for autism treatment for their son faces repeated hurdles

When Sebastian Rios was very young, he barely spoke. “Don’t worry,” his pediatrician told Amparo and Victor Rios, Sebastian’s parents. Children who grow up in homes where both Spanish and English are spoken are sometimes slower to develop their language skills, she said. In addition, Sebastian was developing well in other ways: when he was just 18 months old, for example, he could identify the magnetized letters of the alphabet on the refrigerator of their home in Bronxville, a few minutes in train north of New York. (Andrews, 7/21)

This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news outlets. Sign up for an email subscription.

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MSU Announces Fulbright Student Awards for 2022-23 | MSUToday https://abcingles.net/2022/07/19/msu-announces-fulbright-student-awards-for-2022-23-msutoday/ Tue, 19 Jul 2022 19:29:36 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/07/19/msu-announces-fulbright-student-awards-for-2022-23-msutoday/ After a difficult few years for international engagement, nine Michigan State University students and alumni have been awarded Fulbright US Student Program scholarships for the 2022-2023 academic year and four additional applicants have been named alternates. More than 9,300 applications were submitted this cycle, according to the Institute of International Education. As Fulbright participants, scholars […]]]>

After a difficult few years for international engagement, nine Michigan State University students and alumni have been awarded Fulbright US Student Program scholarships for the 2022-2023 academic year and four additional applicants have been named alternates. More than 9,300 applications were submitted this cycle, according to the Institute of International Education.

As Fulbright participants, scholars will study, conduct research, and teach abroad for the 2022-2023 academic year under the Fulbright US Student Program. Fulbright award recipients are selected through an open, merit-based competition that considers leadership potential, academic and/or professional achievement, and service record.

The 2022-2023 Fulbright MSU American Student Program Scholars are:

Grants for research or study projects

  • Marlo Buser, Serbia – Ph.D., History, Faculty of Social Sciences
  • Amelia Cole, Indonesia – BS, Fisheries and Wildlife, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources
  • Nicolei Gupit, Philippines – MFA, Art, Art History and Design, College of Arts & Letters
  • Zachary Sneed, Israel – BA, Linguistics, College of Arts and Letters
  • Mayson Whipple, Portugal – Ph.D., Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering

English Teaching Assistantship Award

  • Kaylah Jetton, Laos – BA, Global Studies in Arts and Humanities, College of Arts and Letters
  • Emily Keller, Spain – BA, Spanish and Secondary Education, College of Arts and Letters
  • Emily McHarg, Germany – BA, International Relations, James Madison College
  • Mariam Sayed, Morocco – BS, Physiology, College of Natural Sciences, BA, French, College of Arts & Letters

The following students have been designated as substitutes and have the option of receiving a scholarship if funding becomes available:

  • Solomon Kronberg, Thailand – BA, Comparative Cultures and Politics, James Madison College
  • Maxine Osorio, Spain – BA, Special Education, College of Education
  • Kelsey Wagner, Thailand – Ph.D., Cultural Anthropology, Faculty of Social Sciences
  • Bridget Walker, Malawi – BS, Clinical Laboratory Science, College of Natural Sciences

“The range of interests represented by this year’s finalists and alternates proves that no matter your home college, academic discipline or level of study, every Spartan can be a Global Spartan,” said Joy. Campbell, Fulbright Program Advisor at MSU. “MSU offers students the opportunity to view their studies through a global filter – we are so proud of these students who have taken this opportunity as they set out to begin amazing work in every corner of the world.”

Fulbright alumni continue to have enriched careers by joining a network of thousands of esteemed alumni, many of whom are leaders in their fields. Fulbright alumni include 61 Nobel Prize winners, 89 Pulitzer Prize winners, and 40 who have served as heads of state or government.

The Fulbright Program is the U.S. government’s flagship international educational exchange program and is supported by the people of the United States and partner countries around the world. The Fulbright Program is funded by an annual appropriation from the United States Congress to the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the United States Department of State. Participating governments and host institutions, corporations and foundations around the world also provide direct and indirect support to the program.

Since 1946, the Fulbright Program has provided more than 400,000 participants from more than 160 countries with the opportunity to study, teach and conduct research, exchange ideas and help find solutions to international problems. common. The main source of funding for the Fulbright program is an annual appropriation from the United States Congress to the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the United States Department of State. Participating governments and host institutions, corporations, and foundations in foreign countries and the United States also provide direct and indirect support.

The American Fulbright Student Program at MSU is administered through international studies and programs. For more information about the program, visit isp.msu.edu/fulbright. For more information on the Fulbright program or the United States Department of State, please visit eca.state.gov/fulbright.

This story originally appeared on the International Studies and Programs Website.

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