English Alphabet – ABC Ingles http://abcingles.net/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 19:14:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://abcingles.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-4-150x150.png English Alphabet – ABC Ingles http://abcingles.net/ 32 32 English criticism: Hugo Blick’s masterful drama left me speechless https://abcingles.net/2022/11/23/english-criticism-hugo-blicks-masterful-drama-left-me-speechless/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 16:53:21 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/11/23/english-criticism-hugo-blicks-masterful-drama-left-me-speechless/ Photo by Drama Republic/BBC/Amazon Studios It’s hard to know what to say about Hugo Blick’s new drama English. Three episodes and I’m still in awe. My God. What Is it looks like? Nothing I saw at the National Gallery’s Winslow Homer exhibition even came close to those meadows and skies, vast bands of yellow and […]]]>

It’s hard to know what to say about Hugo Blick’s new drama English. Three episodes and I’m still in awe. My God. What Is it looks like? Nothing I saw at the National Gallery’s Winslow Homer exhibition even came close to those meadows and skies, vast bands of yellow and navy blue that stretch as far as the eye can see. As soft as the grass whispers, there’s no lullaby in it – unless you’re talking about the longest sleep of all.

In Blick’s hands, the American West is a graveyard without limits, literally and metaphorically. Wooden crosses mark where someone is below, people go out here as fast as candles. But they also point to the future, to a place where adequate reparation for crimes against people and land will be far beyond the realm of possibility. If Blick (The honorable woman, Rising black earth) wants to give us an exciting adventure, he also wrote a kind of origin story.

East English a masterpiece? I am not sure. But it’s certainly unlike anything I’ve ever seen, its script perfectly exemplifying the maxim that an artist doesn’t need to be believable if they’re convincing (we’re far too involved to care implausibilities).

[See also: Emily Ratajkowski’s new podcast is a painful listen]

The action begins in 1890, when an Englishwoman, Lady Cornelia Locke (Emily Blunt), arrives in Oklahoma in search of the man who murdered her son. Possessing large sums of hard cash, she is understandably soon surrounded by bandits and assassins, bullies provoked not only by her appearance and her independence, but also by her sudden and unwarranted kindness to a man named Eli Whipp. (Chaske Spencer), a former U.S. Army cavalry scout and member of the Pawnee nation, who is on his way to claim a few acres in Nebraska. Somehow, however, Whipp saves her and together they begin the journey north: a double act 100 times more unlikely than the Lone Ranger and Tonto.

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What happens next? All! Blick’s plot is complex, his sense of suspense extreme. The series comes with stylized violence that I find both compelling and difficult to watch. Danger lurks everywhere, and comes in all possible human forms: in the West, everyone manages. Here is a Welsh woman with an eyelidless potty, and here is an English aristocrat carrying a grossly aborted calf. Here are guns, blowguns and bows and arrows, and here are scalpings, lynchings and drownings.

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I think I should warn latecomers of an early scene in which a con man named Richard Watts (Ciarán Hinds) eats prairie oysters (aka oxen testicles), his jaw gnashing suggestively at their horrid sweetness. But even that wasn’t half as surprising as the scene in which a group of English men were playing cricket in their white and blue caps on a plain somewhere in Kansas. One never thinks of what the settlers, whether German, Swedish or English, might have brought with them to the United States, except (perhaps) their Bibles. Will Eli get the land he is owed for his military service? Will Cornelia find her child’s killer? And what could become of their strange partnership? I desperately want to know the answers to these and other questions.

Blick, who also directs, gives us so much to admire. It’s wonderful, the way he riffs backwards on the movies some of us grew up watching – I sometimes thought of Shane, the 1953 classic starring Alan Ladd that was a favorite of my dad – and it pulled such great performances from its cast. I’ll admit I’m unsure of Blunt’s voice, which sounds strange and anachronistic to me, but I like her way with a gun, which she fires fiercely, only for tears to come when she hits her target. Even Stephen Rea, an actor I usually can’t stand, does a decent trick as the sheriff of a town so fledgling it looks like apartment sets on a studio lot.

[See also: She Said is a myopic, timid and trivial attempt at a #MeToo movie]

But it is Spencer who is the real star of the play. He’s amazing: so calm and quiet and controlled. What charisma. Impossible to take your eyes off him. There is poetry in each of his monosyllables. “Huh,” he’ll say, and it might as well be Shakespeare.

English
BBC two,
December 1, 9 p.m.; now in catch-up

This article originally appeared in the November 23, 2022 issue of The New Statesman, Russian roulette

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National care service plans threaten standards https://abcingles.net/2022/11/21/national-care-service-plans-threaten-standards/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 06:18:28 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/11/21/national-care-service-plans-threaten-standards/ WHAT is needed for good quality adult social care is adequate resources and a work culture that provides adequate support to informal carers and strengthens the client’s social networks (“Cosla claims that PHCs are deceived by Minister on Cost of NCS”, The Herald, November 19). This requires the timely contribution of specialists (GPs with significant […]]]>

WHAT is needed for good quality adult social care is adequate resources and a work culture that provides adequate support to informal carers and strengthens the client’s social networks (“Cosla claims that PHCs are deceived by Minister on Cost of NCS”, The Herald, November 19).

This requires the timely contribution of specialists (GPs with significant responsibility) and paid staff who have the time and training to share relevant knowledge with other professionals and share care skills with family and friends . Organizational change will not lead to culture change.

Such a change will require adequate resources. This is not covered by the legislation, which envisages a commission model for the provision of services rather than direct provision. Commissioning will not ensure (in the absence of a Wage Board) adequate training, compensation and conditions for staff. It is likely that good employers, including many local authorities and non-profit organisations, will be unable to compete financially. The result, as in the case of residential care, will be extensive privatization of services as well as the loss of democratic accountability of local authorities.

There is also a problem with the Scottish Government’s management capacity to manage major organizational changes. It has so far spent more than half a million pounds commissioning private external consultants to develop a “business case and operating models” for a national care service. This could well pave the way for multi-million pound contracts for IT and data services. The costs of establishing a new governance structure continue to escalate.

It is to be hoped that at the very least the bill is limited to adult social care and that Holyrood considers alternatives to further privatization and centralization. The current proposals are at best a diversion and at worst will lead to a significant deterioration of services.
David Mumford, dunbar

• ANDY Maciver’s article (“The way to save the NHS is to allow it to be changed”, The Herald, 18 November), was well argued and informative. He challenged the political consensus that the vast bureaucratic organization that is the NHS represents the best healthcare system in the world.

Mr Maciver pointed out that the UK spends just over 10% of its GDP on healthcare, compared to less than 9% for the average OECD country, but the number of hospital beds per capita is significantly lower than in comparable countries and often the results are also worse. The challenge he sets himself is how best to provide an improved service that continues to be taxpayer-funded at no cost to users. This is a debate that is long overdue and vital.

Mary Thomas, in her response (Letters, The Herald, November 19), does not respond to the argument presented. She assumes that any reform requires increased funding and concludes that this can only be prioritized if Scotland is independent. For many supporters of Scotland’s secession from the United Kingdom, whatever the problem, independence is the solution.

As Abraham Maslow said, “I suppose it’s tempting, if the only tool you have is a hammer, to treat everything as if it were a nail.”
George Rennie, Inverness

Banks are the big winners

JEREMY Hunt’s fall statement shows the Tories are determined to punish everyone who is not in the top 10% while crushing the majority of people – the poorest will take a 20% drop in their income.

But let’s shine a light on the biggest winners in this grotesque transfer of wealth from the poorest to the richest: Britain’s commercial banks. Not only has the Conservative government lifted the cap on bank bonuses and cut taxes paid by banks, it will also pay £136billion in interest over the next five years to banks. It’s money the government gave to the banks using quantitative easing (QE), which creates money without incurring debt. That’s £27billion a year that could be used to fund the NHS and education and matches the spending cuts and tax hike Mr Hunt imposed on Thursday.

How did it happen? The government has created almost £900bn of new money through QE, which has been spent in the economy via commercial banks. Banks place this money in a deposit account with the Bank of England, where they earn interest on the money given to them. Interest rates are rising and are expected to hit 5%, meaning banks will rake in another £155billion over the next five years that they have done absolutely nothing for.

Austerity is unnecessary and will cause horrific long-term damage to the country. Labor seems willing to follow this conservative madness. This Union does nothing for Scotland. We have to end it.
Lea Gunn Barrett, Edinburgh

• THE national debt has risen without comment or concern, from around £300 billion in 1997 to around £2.7 trillion today. This staggering sum is just the total of all annual deficits in this period, and is largely money created out of thin air by the banking system, at the behest of the government.

So why are we now being asked to pay £55billion in cuts and taxes? Surely that too can be financed in the same way, and as long as we can pay the interest due to the banks, everything will be normal, and the national debt will increase to £2.755 billion.
Malcolm Parkin, Kinross

In pursuit of the right to choose

RUTH Marr (Letters, November 19) was almost right in his assertion that English voters are forced to choose between the two acts of tribute to Ukip represented by the Labor and Conservative parties. She forgot – understandably – to mention that many will not want to put their crosses against either of these last two and will effectively abstain in voting for, and in many cases electing, a tribute candidate. to Groucho Marx proposed by the LibDems (“these are my principles – but if you don’t like them I have others”).

She was right to point out that Scottish voters, regardless of their ethnicity, country of birth or political affiliation, have the opportunity to unite their voices in demanding the democratic right to elect the government of their choice in a independent, welcoming and open environment. in search of a European nation.
Willie Maclean, Milngavie

Croatia could be our model

A country the size of Scotland rarely mentioned by nationalists in their “if they can do it, why not Scotland?” the list is Croatia.

Could it be because their route to the EU and the euro doesn’t fit the narrative?

They became an independent state in 1991, used the former Yugoslav dinar until the creation of the Kuna in 1994, applied to join the EU in 2003, became a candidate state in 2004, joined in 2013 (after a 66% “yes” vote in 2012), and will abandon the Kuna and join the euro on January 1, 2023.

I’m sure this 31 year journey can be shortened for Scotland but otherwise assuming there is a ‘leave’ vote in an independence referendum in October 2023 we won’t be joining not to the euro before 2054.

And that’s if we meet the conditions as well as Croatia. They have pledged to join the euro as a condition of EU membership. They have had their own currency for 29 years, 10 of them as EU members and between 2013 and 2021 their deficit has averaged just below the EU limit of 3% of GDP.

It was actually 1% or less in three of the past five years. Scotland’s average over the same period is 10.7% including a Covid 23.45% in 2021, or 9.15% less that year.

Compared to Croatia’s experience and the considerable efforts made to respect the budgetary rules, the SNP and the Greens have an arduous task, not only to agree on a monetary strategy, but also to explain to the voters and the EU the measures they will take to reach a deficit level of 3%. .
Allan Sutherland, stone haven

Burned fingers once before

YOUR correspondent Alan Carmichael (Letters, November 18) suggests that when faced with two evils, we should choose independence – one we have not tried before.

Are the memories so short that he forgot that this course of action was the one recently pursued by Liz Truss and Kwasi Kwarteng?

How’s it going?
Peter A Russel, Glasgow

mature judgments

ASH Regan and other SNP MSPs who have expressed reservations about 16-17 year olds seeking legal sex reassignment, but not biological sex, despite being too immature to make such an important decision, need to consider whether yes or no 16-17-year-olds are too immature to vote in a referendum on independence.

The Prime Minister is expected to champion the franchise issue, seeing Scottish independence as a more important issue than the welfare of our children; indeed “the most important question”; eclipsing global warming and gender issues, among others.
William Duward, Bearsden


HeraldScotland:

Letters should not exceed 500 words. We reserve the right to modify submissions.


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Thumbnails of the Hindi media revolution by one of its most experienced insiders https://abcingles.net/2022/11/18/thumbnails-of-the-hindi-media-revolution-by-one-of-its-most-experienced-insiders/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 09:45:26 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/11/18/thumbnails-of-the-hindi-media-revolution-by-one-of-its-most-experienced-insiders/ Mrinal Pande is one of India’s most versatile writers and editors, working with equal ease in Hindi and English. She was a public intellectual and media leader for 40 years. In his latest book, The journey of Hindi-language journalism in India. From Raj to Swaraj and beyond, she celebrates and criticizes the rise of the […]]]>

Mrinal Pande is one of India’s most versatile writers and editors, working with equal ease in Hindi and English. She was a public intellectual and media leader for 40 years.

In his latest book, The journey of Hindi-language journalism in India. From Raj to Swaraj and beyond, she celebrates and criticizes the rise of the Hindi language in the mass media.

Her thoughts draw on a knowledge of Indian media affairs acquired in newspapers, news agencies, television and government over a long career as an author, journalist, editor and administrator. The changes have been vast and she has been at the center of many of them.

The journey of Hindi-language journalism in India. From Raj to Swaraj and beyond, Mrinal Pande, Orient Blackswan, 2022.

Hindi is India’s largest language, spoken mostly in the north by around 600 million people, or about 43% of the population of 1.4 billion.

Pande’s mother was a distinguished author of Hindi fiction, and although Pande had an impeccable education in English, she is a fierce champion of Hindi.

Indeed, you can almost hear her stammer as she recounts how, ” I managed [as an editor] various Hindi monthly and weekly magazines and the daily in several Hindi editions, Hindustan, for two of India’s largest media outlets. Along the way, I’ve heard various marketing heads tell me that I should excuse them for not reading the “product” themselves, because they don’t read Hindi.

Another marketing manager who was aiming for the rise “didn’t want to be photographed with the junior marketing staff of the Hindi newspaper” (66-67).

The focus on “marketing” highlights one of Hindi’s long-standing handicaps. Its elegant Devanagari script ran into trouble with Gutenberg technology when printing came to India 350 years ago.

Printing costs money. The type must be made and maintained, ink and paper purchased, and a printing press found and operated. Skilled workers must be paid. It is no coincidence that the first newspapers appeared in the 1600s as European traders set out across the world.

Commerce needed information, and the people delivering that information could charge for it – and for delivering other people’s messages.

Advertising was born.

Pande sketches the problems encountered by the Devanagari script of Hindi in adapting to metal movable type. Devanagari uses conjoined characters (joined combinations) and to print attractively in Devanagari required up to 900 characters of different shapes (about nine times as many small metal shapes as needed for the Roman alphabet). This problem was not effectively solved until the 1980s with the advent of computerized typesetting and inexpensive offset presses.

Readership was another issue for Hindi. When India became independent in 1947, less than one in five people was literate, and in the Hindi regions of northern India it was closer to one in six or seven people. If people read a newspaper, they were likely to read an English-language newspaper. Circulation of Hindi dailies did not exceed English circulation until 1977.

Pande has been at the heart of rapid transformation since the 1980s. Literacy increased and attractive newspapers could be produced quickly, even in rural towns. More importantly, advertisers have woken up to the vast and growing markets of rural India. Hindustan in hindi, once the poor son-in-law of the influential english Hindustan timehas grown from 50,000 thin copies a day in the 1950s to 2.2 million a day, released simultaneously in 20 cities by 2022. Hindustan was not alone; major rivals expanded at the same time.

As small-scale newspapers grew into large media companies, owners entered the television market in the 1990s. Referring to the four major Hindi media companies, Pande writes: to date, acquired an impressive range of other media platforms in the digital world” (85).

The larger operators have developed a warm relationship with the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) government which “is fully aware of the importance of Hindi in conveying its message to the last village”. There have been “rich dividends for both the government and the media” (131).

She sees that the vigor of Hindi media can be too easily squeezed into the Hindu-supremacist vision of what India should be – a country where Hindi is not just the most widely spoken language, but the dominant language. Such a line engenders “the fears and concerns of non-Hindi states” (138) where 55% of the population live.

Pande details gaps and worrying trends. One is “paid news”, in which advertisers or politicians pay for celebratory stories positioned as “news”. Another is the ruthless cutting of costs to the point where newsgathering is left to poorly paid freelancers with little training and few employment rights. A third is the nature of the web which “sends content…polluted by aggregators and algorithms spreading… [an] incendiary mixture as news” (146).

There remains the age-old problem: how to pay the bills? In recent years, Facebook and WhatsApp have sucked up “70-80% of digital advertising in India” (152). Government advertising becomes even more important for print publications.

The book is at its best when Pande writes about the changes she sees or has been a part of. The eight chapters are peppered with subtitles introducing mini-essays on topics Pande has things to say about. This gives the book a fragmentary feel, more of a mosaic than a portrait; but it has the advantage of allowing browsers to find topics specific to their interests.

For readers outside India, the book highlights the growing importance of India’s largest language and the immense transformation of India’s capacity to produce and consume information. For Indian readers, the book represents the thoughts of one of the country’s most experienced insiders on the Hindi media revolution.

Robin Jeffrey is Visiting Research Professor at the Institute of South Asian Studies, National University of Singapore.

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Hospital patients pay the price for the social care crisis | Letters https://abcingles.net/2022/11/15/hospital-patients-pay-the-price-for-the-social-care-crisis-letters/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 19:04:00 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/11/15/hospital-patients-pay-the-price-for-the-social-care-crisis-letters/ Regarding your article about patients stuck in the hospital, I was cured in three weeks, but not released until 16 (Up to one in three English hospital beds occupied by dischargeable patients, 13 November). After three weeks, the nurses who looked after me when I needed treatment had to spend 10 minutes every day chatting […]]]>

Regarding your article about patients stuck in the hospital, I was cured in three weeks, but not released until 16 (Up to one in three English hospital beds occupied by dischargeable patients, 13 November). After three weeks, the nurses who looked after me when I needed treatment had to spend 10 minutes every day chatting and watching me to make sure I wasn’t depressed. Add other patients in the same position and it takes a significant chunk out of the grueling 12 hour shifts that most of these overworked, underpaid and dedicated people have to work.

Feeding myself and changing my bedding when I could have done that at home was another unnecessary cost to the NHS. I could not be released because there were no carers available for weeks to check that I was doing independently. I was. Also, the caregivers were paid so poorly that most of those I saw had to take other jobs to make ends meet. I wonder how many members of this Conservative Cabinet (if any) rely solely on the NHS for their medical care.
John Griffiths
monmouth

Our family benefited from the services of caregivers for our handicapped and wheelchair-bound adult son. They help us get him up every morning and get ready for bed every night. We see their work up close and consider them to be very hardworking, professional and always cheerful. They have also become members of our family and good friends to our son. They deserve better rewards.

The agencies that employ them will only get contracts by keeping costs to a minimum, a large part of which is salaries. It seems so obvious that if they were paid more, more staff could be hired and hospital beds could be freed up. I realize that extra places in care homes would be needed, but what happened to all the local authority homes that disappeared because the ‘private sector’ would provide them?
Name and address provided

It was standard for local community hospitals to provide an acute care hospital “shrink” feature – a place where recovering patients could move to immediately after treatment while preparing to return to normal life. But official guidelines no longer highlight this as a route for discharged patients.

Additionally, in recent years, NHS England and its cohorts at local level have closed beds in community hospitals, despite local resistance in places like here in Far West Cornwall; we used to have two community hospitals and now we have lost both. Certainly, local social services are under enormous pressure. But the real scandal is the lack of common thinking within the NHS.
Doctor Pierre Levin
West Cornwall Health Watch

For too long, the social protection solution that has garnered the most attention has been protecting older people’s assets – primarily the value of a home they will no longer live in, so that inheritances can continue to grow. based on distortions in the housing market. Meanwhile, the social care sector is on its knees, with local authorities unable to pay fees, care providers unable to recruit and retain enough staff, and hospitals providing room and board rather than medical care. medical care.

The case for the creation of a national care service has never been stronger, and while there is no clear commitment to make it a top priority, the impact on health services will be even more important.
The Brights
Exeter, Devon

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Your community: Books to Go kits https://abcingles.net/2022/11/12/your-community-books-to-go-kits/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 16:11:54 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/11/12/your-community-books-to-go-kits/ Each themed kit contains a curated selection of books, audio, DVD and activity sheet to help foster a love of reading and early development of literacy skills. Johnson County Library’s Books to Go kits support the 6 by 6, Ready to Read early literacy initiative by making it easy and convenient to bring the library […]]]>


Each themed kit contains a curated selection of books, audio, DVD and activity sheet to help foster a love of reading and early development of literacy skills.

Johnson County Library’s Books to Go kits support the 6 by 6, Ready to Read early literacy initiative by making it easy and convenient to bring the library into your home or early education center. Books to Go kits give you and your child a variety of ways to enjoy and explore ABCs, Bugs, Colors, and more.

The Library’s 6 by 6, Ready to Read skills are skills that children learn before they learn to read. Reading, singing, speaking, rhyming, playing with shapes and enjoying playing with books are essential skills for children long before they even start learning their letters. Reading, singing and rhyming give a child invaluable experience listening to the music and rhythms of the English language. Talking improves a child’s future vocabulary – long before they are able to imitate the words they hear, the amount of words they are exposed to has a huge positive effect on future reading enjoyment, grades and test success. Naming and manipulating shapes helps children identify letters in the future. And play with books; imitating adults turning pages, opening and closing books, and moving pages from side to side stimulates motor skill development and teaches children that books are fun. Books to Go kits encourage all of these skills, in an easy-to-grasp package ready for your family to enjoy.

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The tragedy of English football https://abcingles.net/2022/11/09/the-tragedy-of-english-football/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 14:39:21 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/11/09/the-tragedy-of-english-football/ A fan mourns England’s 4-1 loss to Germany in the 2010 World Cup. Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images When Thomas Müller scored Germany’s last goal in a 4-1 loss to England in the 2010 World Cup, the BBC commentator was a broken man. How many German players, Guy Mowbray asked sadly, would make the England […]]]>

When Thomas Müller scored Germany’s last goal in a 4-1 loss to England in the 2010 World Cup, the BBC commentator was a broken man. How many German players, Guy Mowbray asked sadly, would make the England squad? A compelling response quickly followed from thousands of viewers. At least ten, and it could be a full house if captain and right-back Philipp Lahm imagines a shot down the left.

The regular beatings suffered by the men’s national team clearly counted for nothing in the fantasy world inhabited by England supporters. Scotland’s ‘Wembley Wizards’ taught the first lesson in 1928, winning 5-1. The debacle of the United States (1-0) in the 1950 World Cup followed. Three years later, the Magnificent Magyars, led by Ferenc Puskás, would score six goals in London, and seven more a year later in Budapest . The Germans in 1972 and the Dutch in 1988 revealed the chasm of skill and tactical sophistication.

Then, six years ago, came that 2-1 defeat to Iceland, the most brutal humiliation of all. What a dismal record it is, and England still expect it. No, requirements. In the mythical kingdom of “Ing-er-land”, English exceptionalism remains commonplace. We gave the game to the world. They owe us.

[See also: Football’s data delusion]

Is English football not even ‘English’ anymore? The Premier League, created 30 years ago for commercial reasons, is an international television entertainment that takes place (for now) in this country.

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Ian Chappell, Australia’s great cricket captain, said that having given cricket to the world, the English had done nothing to develop the game. It’s a levy that could be more usefully applied to winter sports . The English have codified the laws of football but the national team has little to show for a century of hiccups, except a midsummer success of Swinging London.

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At the heart of England’s failure is a hint of unusual talent. Peter Osgood, a center forward with rare gifts, received four selections. Alan Hudson, a fine passer of the ball, won two, one more than Charlie George. It was the dark days of the 70s, when England failed to qualify for two World Cups, and wondered why. The English, said Miljan Miljanić, the widely traveled Serbian coach, made the “best middle footballers” in the world, admired for their spirit. England has never produced a Pelé, a Di Stéfano, a Cruyff or a Zidane.

“Glen [Hoddle] must learn that disappointment is part of football,” said Ron Greenwood, a particularly weak England manager, when he let go of the Tottenham midfielder after a superb start in 1979. Ah, wrote Brian Glanville, the king of football writers, but what a disappointment? This question gets to the heart of the matter, because the answer is clear: England, every time.

“We are absolutely overwhelmed when it comes to our training ideas,” coach Jimmy Hogan wrote in 1931, “and the sooner we realize this, the better.” Three decades later, in soccer man, Arthur Hopcraft castigated a British arrogance “reflected vividly and calamitously in football”. Witnesses are not lacking in Paul Hayward for his history of the national team.

Fortunately, there are other tales, which the author unfolds with clarity and impartiality. Hayward, who is no parochial tub beater, finds much to admire in top players, from Nat Lofthouse to Harry Kane, while keeping an eye on the evidence of history. He knows we love football in this country, in an increasingly superficial and tribal way. He also knows that we have never been as good as we imagine.

Apart from Wembley in 1966, was there a golden day? There was. On June 7, 1970, England lost by one goal to Brazil. Two weeks later, Brazil were crowned world champions, a team without parallel, but that day in Leon, England were tied. They were a manly side – possibly England’s best XI ever to field.

Another World Cup is just around the corner and the TV studio cheerleaders (“We’re going to beat them!”) have started repeating their platitudes in fractured English. Feathers in our brains, lead in our boots and millionaires occupying every village in Cheshire. Will we ever learn?

English football: the biography 1872-2022
By Paul Hayward
Simon & Schuster, 613 pages, £25

Buying a book can earn NS a commission from Bookshop.org, which supports independent bookstores

[See also: Does the FA Cup need saving?]

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Colors of Change: my very large painting https://abcingles.net/2022/11/07/colors-of-change-my-very-large-painting/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 00:11:52 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/11/07/colors-of-change-my-very-large-painting/ A note from Yasamin Safarzadeh, Program Director at Kimball Jenkins: I want to take a moment to share my continued support and enthusiasm for this youth writing inkubator facilitated by the efforts of Manchester InkLink. This partnership elevates the voices of youth and young adults in our community, regardless of background. These educational opportunities are […]]]>

A note from Yasamin Safarzadeh, Program Director at Kimball Jenkins:

I want to take a moment to share my continued support and enthusiasm for this youth writing inkubator facilitated by the efforts of Manchester InkLink. This partnership elevates the voices of youth and young adults in our community, regardless of background. These educational opportunities are integral to listening to the voices that are so important and so often overlooked in the state. Please continue to log in and search for us on social for more items! LinkedIn here. Instagram here.

Yasmin Safarzadeh

CONCORD, NH – We began to Kimball Jenkins‘s painting about diversity and equality of people. Our unveiling reception was held on August 18 from 6-7:30 p.m. Everyone came! We had dancing, music and food.

More than two of the students below, in their own words.



How did I get to Kimball Jenkins? – by Clemence Masambeta

My cousin and I met Yasamin Safaradeh at the YWCA in Manchester. First we thought she was pretty weird. The more we came to events with Yaz, the nicer I thought she was and that we could spend time together. I looked at her on Instagram and saw she was making art and I love art. I started practicing and practicing until she said one day I met her at Pulaski Park with my siblings and cousins ​​where we got to paint and she introduced us to the Juneteenth show at HopKnot for the month of June.

My painting was an eye, but my painting was not selling. My brother’s painting sold because it was messy. I never painted messy, but I started to think it was smart to be more free in my drawings. One day I got a DM from Yaz who told me she was impressed with my painting skills and there was a job at Kimball Jenkins that was paying. She said the work was about diversity and equality. I was interested in my cousin Judith and so we filled in the file and I met some new friends and we worked together and we finally finished the painting! Yaz is great. She’s the reason I got the job and the reason I started painting.


Judith Nsimire goes to Central High School and is in 9th grade. She loves to cook, do art and fashion. She’s a new American from Congo to Burundi. Her mother tongue is Swahili, she grew up speaking a little French, but she practices her English every day.

What do we think of the program and why do we care? –Judith Nsimire

As a band, we really care where people are from or who they are. Everything from your past is important to who you are right now. We care about art. That’s why we painted a mural about diversity, cultures, accents and tribes.

I’m here because I love translating people’s different languages ​​and I’m good with social media and the Google suite. I like to communicate with people and I am very charismatic. It is a great joy for me to use all my skills in this program which my cousin and I are attending.

English is not my first language, that’s why I’m a calm person. When someone asks me a question I get nervous and scared because I know the answer but I can’t say it because I think people will laugh at my broken African English. These fears prevent me from making new friends. I work with My turn now at my school in Central and they help me improve my English. I like the app they have for their phone. That’s very cool.

Because of these fears, I love being with my people because I know I’m safe. I enjoy spending time with my family and friends once I enter Kimball Jenkins. I was nervous and when they asked me questions I couldn’t answer because I was shy and I know people laugh at me because of my English, but I tried my best and I learned the whole alphabet. I am also taking summer courses and my English was starting to improve more and more. I started reading more books and learning science and when I got to sixth grade I was getting all Aces in science and math but social studies and language are hard for me so I got D’s and F’s, but I kept doing my best until I went to seventh grade. I believe in myself. I’m just nervous.

I kept persevering and doing my best and slowly my grades improved. But many obstacles continue to hinder my education. There is only one teacher who speaks Swahili in my school, it is very difficult for us. Even though I’m nervous, because of this internship with KJ (Kimball Jenkins) and Unchartered Art with Amber Nicole Cannan who helped with the internship, I feel ready and excited to make new friends. I know that in the future I will be like them.

I am very happy these days. When my father arrived in this country, he spoke little English. In the Congo there was a war when I was 5 and my little brother was 2. My mother put him on his back and tied a blanket very tightly around him. I sat inside a big yellow bucket. My mother crossed a river – she knew how because my aunt had done it before. The water carried us to my aunt’s house. My father was still in Congo to work. He remained there until the end of the war. We waited four years, until 2017 when there was less war to show our papers to arrive in America.

We were happy when they told us we were going to be in a safe state. When we arrived in America, people picked us up from the airport and took us to the market to bring us food. They cooked for us and slowly we started to heal. We get a lot of food from Amber Nicole and her friends because we had to leave our asbestos apartment and go to a hotel. Now we are back. I hope to work and my cousin too, so that we can earn money to have our own food.


Below: Photo gallery of the Kimball Jenkins team seeing the sites and finding inspiration through art.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


Editor’s Note: This is part of a series of stories who amplify the voices of young artists through a program at Kimball Jenkins in Concord. Student-artists are mentored by program director and Manchester artist, Yazamin Safarzadeh.


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Group offering Red Bank Apartment Complex for Autistic Adults https://abcingles.net/2022/11/03/group-offering-red-bank-apartment-complex-for-autistic-adults/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 23:00:53 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/11/03/group-offering-red-bank-apartment-complex-for-autistic-adults/ A New Jersey-based nonprofit aims to create an apartment complex in Monmouth County specifically for people with autism spectrum disorders. An unprecedented study by Parents with a plan, based in Morris County, found that 73% of “neuro-diverse” adults in New Jersey currently live with an aging family. Tens of thousands of people have carers over […]]]>

A New Jersey-based nonprofit aims to create an apartment complex in Monmouth County specifically for people with autism spectrum disorders.

An unprecedented study by Parents with a plan, based in Morris County, found that 73% of “neuro-diverse” adults in New Jersey currently live with an aging family. Tens of thousands of people have carers over the age of 60, according to their survey conducted between March and August this year.

“It’s amazing when you think about it, what happens after that?” said Karen Fluharty, founder of Parents With A Plan.

Fluharty’s 20-year-old son, Ryan, has autism and is currently enrolled in a transition program in Arizona that teaches life skills and promotes independent living.

“I quickly realized that the offerings for our neuro-diverse population are really slim,” Fluharty said. “How do we keep them from going to the couch at 21?”

According to the group, more than 200,000 people in New Jersey have intellectual/developmental disabilities. In the non-profit organisation’s survey, around 75% of respondents said they fear loneliness and isolation in the future. The main concern of people seeking an independent living situation was to find help in connecting with people and places.

“If we don’t develop the skills for independent living now, these people are at risk of becoming homeless and simply having an inability to connect with existing services that can help them,” Fluharty said.

Parents With A Plan owns land in Red Bank that it hopes to develop into a 32-unit supportive apartment building. The next step in the process is to present the plan to borough officials for any potential zoning ordinance.

Apartment Complex Project at Red Bank (Parents With A Plan)

Apartment Complex Project at Red Bank (Parents With A Plan)

The proposed building’s “hardware and software” would cater to the neuro-diverse population, Fluharty said. The complex would serve as a springboard to independent living.

Apartments would be hardwired with low-voltage lighting, bathrooms would have floor drains to prevent flooding, and stoves would have an automatic shut-off feature, Fluharty said.

The entire first floor of the building would be dedicated to facilities such as an educational kitchen, a health and wellness area and a 24-hour reception.

Fluharty said his organization is working with the Rutgers Center for Adult Autism Services on the proposed project. Among its many roles, the center would monitor the progress of residents.

“Our goal is to create a scalable model,” Fluharty said.

Dino Flamma is a reporter for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at dino.flammia@townsquaremedia.com

Click here to contact an editor about a comment or correction for this story.

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USask bestows highest honor on famous writer – News https://abcingles.net/2022/11/01/usask-bestows-highest-honor-on-famous-writer-news/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 15:39:11 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/11/01/usask-bestows-highest-honor-on-famous-writer-news/ Mark Abley with his parents upon graduation from the University of Saskatchewan in 1975. (Photo: Submitted) Abley, a USask graduate who earned a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in English and a Rhodes Scholarship in 1975, will receive an honorary degree at the afternoon graduation ceremony at the Merlis campus. Belsher Place on Wednesday, November 9. […]]]>
Mark Abley with his parents upon graduation from the University of Saskatchewan in 1975. (Photo: Submitted)

Abley, a USask graduate who earned a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in English and a Rhodes Scholarship in 1975, will receive an honorary degree at the afternoon graduation ceremony at the Merlis campus. Belsher Place on Wednesday, November 9.

After studying at USask and St. John’s College, Oxford University in England, Abley returned to Canada in 1978 to embark on a celebrated career as a successful writer and publisher in Toronto and Montreal.

“We are pleased to recognize Mr. Abley for his outstanding work, passion and commitment to inspiring future generations of writers,” said USask President Peter Stoicheff. “We are proud to call him one of our own and grateful that he never forgot his Saskatchewan roots which have remained a source of inspiration and affection for him throughout his distinguished career.

Abley has worked in Toronto as a writer and contributing editor to both Maclean’s and Saturday night magazines and has contributed frequently to Times Literary Supplementbefore moving to Montreal with his wife Ann in 1983. He then worked as a writer, editor and columnist for the Montreal Gazette, and won the National Newspaper of Canada Award for Critical Writing in 1996.

A self-described “journalist in recovery”, Abley was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2005 and was the first Canadian recipient of Spain’s LiberPress Award for International Authors in 2009. Abley has written eight non-fiction books, two children’s books and four books of poetry, delivered a number of memorable readings and keynote addresses in Saskatchewan, and spoke at the 2019 Word on the Street Festival in Saskatoon and the Festival of Words in Moose Jaw. His latest book, A strange disconcerting time: from Istanbul to Kathmandu in the last year of the Hippie Trail, will be released in 2023.

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Senator to Murphy on COVID vaccine rule for schools: Don’t do it https://abcingles.net/2022/10/28/senator-to-murphy-on-covid-vaccine-rule-for-schools-dont-do-it/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 20:00:31 +0000 https://abcingles.net/2022/10/28/senator-to-murphy-on-covid-vaccine-rule-for-schools-dont-do-it/ TRENTON — As the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention prepares to recommend that school children be required to get COVID shots, a state senator wants to stop Gov. Phil Murphy’s administration from enacting the rule in the New Jersey. An advisory committee at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last Thursday advised that […]]]>

TRENTON — As the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention prepares to recommend that school children be required to get COVID shots, a state senator wants to stop Gov. Phil Murphy’s administration from enacting the rule in the New Jersey.

An advisory committee at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last Thursday advised that the COVID vaccine be added to the list of recommended vaccinations for school children starting next year.

The full CDC will make changes to its guidelines in early 2023. But ultimately, states decide what is required for school attendance, not the federal government.

Arihana Macias, 7, receives a compress after reviving the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for children five to 12 years old at a Dallas County Health and Human Vaccination Site in Mesquite, Texas on Thursday, November 4, 2021. ( AP Photo/LM Otero/Seth Wenig, File)

(AP Photo/LM Otero/Seth Wenig, File)

Proposal to ban vaccine mandate

Sen. Kristin Corrado, R-Passaic, on Thursday proposed legislation (S3267) that would ban mandatory COVID-19 vaccination as a condition for attending K-12 public schools.

“Parents across the state share my concerns about the administration’s intentions,” Corrado said. “This bill makes it clear that we don’t want bureaucrats in Trenton intimidating New Jersey families with more medical claims.”

The Murphy administration hasn’t said what it intends to do, if the entire CDC ends up recommending it.

“At this time, vaccination against COVID-19 is not a requirement for school attendance in New Jersey,” said Dalya Ewais, director of communications for the state Department of Health. “However, the New Jersey Department of Health strongly recommends that everyone be up to date with age-appropriate vaccinations, as recommended by the CDC’s Immunization Practices Advisory Committee.”

Virus outbreak Vaccines for children New York

PA

Childhood COVID vaccination rates

According CDC data.

  • Under 2 years old, became eligible in June: 5.4% one dose, 2.7% full dose
  • 2-4 years, eligible since June: 9.2% one shot, 4.8% full dose
  • 5 to 11 years old, eligible since November 2021: 47.2% one shot, 40% full dose, 12.9% one booster
  • 12 to 17 years: 85.5% one dose, 74.3% full dose, 32.5% booster

“Obviously, parents object to the governor or anyone else telling them that they have to vaccinate their children with a vaccine that doesn’t seem particularly effective in preventing the virus,” Corrado said.

According state health department data.

And the college students?

Corrado and three other lawmakers are sponsoring a similar bill that would ban colleges and universities from requiring students to receive a COVID-19 vaccine.

That bill followed one sponsored by four other lawmakers that would mandate COVID-19 vaccines for students, staff and others on college campuses.

Michael Symons is the Statehouse Bureau Chief for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at michael.symons@townsquaremedia.com

Click here to contact an editor about a comment or correction for this story.

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Keep reading to find answers to 25 common questions about the COVID-19 vaccine.

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